Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. I've been doing this for a week now. My stomach is more calm, I have more energy and concentration. I do it in our Vitamix each morning... first thing. I wait for an hour before I consume anything else. I'm 60 and it seems that my skin is smoother. And the arthritis in my wrists and ankles is less! I'm not kidding! NO B.S. You can get this or go on YOUTUBE and find out more. https://www.amazon.com/dp/140195765X/?coliid=I7LHYABD3TS7Z&colid=L5YEUJ15BMF1&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
  3. If you use the forum search function for Permatex you'll get a whole boatload of hits.
  4. Thank you cmiller. I'll have a look. I'll let you know how everything went.
  5. Today
  6. On the facbook page I have seen people using this https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-81878-Maximum-Temperature-Silicone/dp/B0002UEOPA/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1535321456&sr=1-1&refinements=p_72%3A1248921011%2Cp_n_feature_seven_browse-bin%3A5485542011&fbclid=IwAR18Dz1XBnxX807iSHgYpgTDsYN88XxP3GU3AV8KhydZf-sBXRuGrOmCXWk&pldnSite=1
  7. For side dishes, baked beans, roasted corn and fried potatoes are hits at my house. Mac n' cheese goes with about anything as well. Oh yeah, some nice hush puppies will round things out too. https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/brown-sugar-baked-beans-3373383 https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/perfectly-grilled-corn-on-the-cob-recipe-1956289 https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/bacon-fried-potatoes-212473 https://www.thespruceeats.com/deep-fried-southern-hush-puppies-3056900 Of course, good pulled pork works with a lot of things. My brother-in-law serves it with red beans and rice.
  8. Hi all, I am having about 10 people over for dinner on Sunday and I would like to make some pulled pork. As you are aware not a lot of people have heard of it in my neck of the woods and I am not an expert either so here I am, seeking for advice once again . So, a couple of questions: The pork should be ready to be served at 20:00 so I can't cook it at 225F since it takes me about 14-16 hours to cook it at that temp, which means I have to start cooking early in the morning (not going to happen!!). I was thinking perhaps cooking the butt at 275F but I never did it this way and I can't estimate the cooking time nor am I sure whether anything in the method changes. Any help on this would be appreciated. I am thinking on a 10 lbs butt, bone in. What side dishes (if any) do you usually offer with pulled pork? So far I had it on a bun with coleslaw and BBQ sauce but that's it. Never did any side dishes like potatoes or veggies, or anything like that. Any ideas? Thank you all for your replies.
  9. Hi I'm in Bridgend South Wales and here is my BBQ setup I have a Costco Pitt Boss 24 and a small Kamado I made from a Keg P.S Wasn't sure if you meant to comment on the Amazon link
  10. Thanks, I'll have to check those out.
  11. Unless something has changed you’ll get doublesided adhesive tape. Others may chime in regarding a high-heat adhesive you can use instead. Or even to reglue the current gasket. Permatex I think.
  12. Just curious why a riser is needed and can anyone confirm if the SmokeWare “The Raiser” is a good fit for a Big Joe stone? Seems Smokeware doesn’t have the XL model in stock that fits 21” stones and they only list it as compatible with a BGE where as they usually specify for the KJ.
  13. The house was built in 1978. The fridge was on the wall where the brown hutch was acting as extra cabinet space that didn’t exist in the kitchen. It was at a stage when it was falling apart. The old kitchen had to go.
  14. Welcome to the forum!
  15. Just sent of an inquiry to KJ customer service.... Bottom gasket adhesive no longer working. Gasket is sitting on rim and moves when you touch it with grill lid open. Appears to work fine ( no leaks) and be structurally sound. Would you recommend replacing entire gasket or just re applying adhesive and if so what kind? ... before I finished typing this they responded that they are sending me a replacement gasket. Had the grill just over a year BTW. That’s some good customer service there. But question to the board; I assume they will include adhesive but is there a better option?
  16. Welcome, glad to have both you and your new Joe with us.
  17. Recent posts about the best mac & cheese caused me to wonder if any members use melting salts to make their own meltable cheese. Two searches didn’t produce a “hit” so I decided to post an introduction. There’s a huge convenience factor with processed cheese because it melts so nicely, but you’ll get a better flavor from other cheeses. You can easily make perfectly melting cheese and non-separating cheese sauces (for mac & cheese or nachos) by using your favorite cheese, whether it's aged or unaged, and melting salts. For mac & cheese I've been making homemade American Cheese using sharp cheddar (sometimes smoked) and milk. It melts like Velveeta but tastes waaaaaay better. With melting salts, the cheese sauce for mac & cheese is quick and simple and eliminates the need to mess with roux. I measure 1oz dry elbow macaroni per serving and cook it. For the cheese sauce, I double the weight in milk and any favorite gourmet cheese(s). Two oz each per serving adding 4% melting salt to the milk. I add the cooked macaroni to the cheese sauce and put it on my smoke pit ‘till hot and bubbling. This article can start you down the melting salts path: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/melty-cheese-slices. They heat the mixture sous vide but, if you’re careful, you can just use a heavy sauce pan and low heat and it’ll work just as well. You may be inspired to try their nachos: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/nacho-cheese. And here’s their mac & cheese recipe. https://modernistcuisine.com/recipes/silky-smooth-macaroni-and-cheese/. This is the stepping off point. Use it as the foundation for your special version. Then try Alfredo sauce with sous vide shrimp. When making a smooth cheese sauce for Mac & Cheese, consider the weight of the cheese to be 100%, then the weight of the liquid should be 93% of the weight of the cheese, and the weight of the sodium citrate should be 4% of that liquid weight (which is approximately the same as 2% of the sum of the liquid weight plus cheese weight). The formula is very forgiving so there's no need to be extremely precise. This method of making a silky and non-separating cheese sauce is very easy. No need to make a roux or a bechamel sauce which masks the pure flavor of your favorite cheese. Just whisk a teaspoon or two of sodium citrate into your liquid of choice, heat the liquid and blend in your favorite grated cheese with a stick blender, regular blender, or whisk. This results in a smooth, creamy texture that doesn't become grainy, greasy, or separated. You can also add in any flavors you enjoy like Rotel with green chile or Pico de Gallo. You can refrigerate any leftovers and reheat it the next day to enjoy the smoothest cheese sauce ever! For other types of cheese sauces, you can control the final "thickness" of the cheese sauce depending on your ratio of liquid to cheese. If you weigh your cheese and then measure the liquid (water, milk, beer, wine, stock, etc.) as a percentage of that cheese weight, you will get: Cheese plus 0% to 35% liquid weight = firm, use for making "American" cheese slices for burgers, etc. Cheese plus 35% to 85% liquid weight = thick and flowing cheese sauce, good for dips and queso. Cheese plus 85% to 120% liquid weight = thin cheese sauce, good for fondues, mac & cheese, etc. Cheese plus 120% liquid weight or more = continues to become a thinner and thinner sauce. 100% weight of cheese 16 oz. 93% wipping cream 14.88 oz. 4% liquid weight = 0.60 oz. Sodium Citrate I can measure that small amount of Sodium Citrate with a quality scale. I use a handloading scale and convert to gram weight. I think this scale will work: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01HCKQG7G/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1. If you don't have a scale, here's an easy hack to use: granulated sodium citrate weighs about 4.25 grams per teaspoon (which is equivalent to about 0.15 ounces per teaspoon). So in the example above, you could use 4 level teaspoons of sodium citrate (= .6 ounces). Caution: Sodium Citrate is NOT the same as Citric Acid. Use Sodium Citrate for the results above. You can buy it on Amazon.
  18. Tip Top Temp (mechanical vent controller)
  19. I don't know that looks just like their kitchen except the fidge would be were that cabinet near the microwave is-LOL Scott
  20. RichM

    Left Over Part

    Thank you Burger Meister. With your help I was able to find a video showing it's use. It would be nice if the part was labeled or mentioned in the manual. I put off building my first fire yesterday because I thought I might have not installed an important part.
  21. Hello All! I've made the plunge into the world of Kamado cooking. After going through a Traeger and a Green Mountain pellet burner, a Weber Smoky Joe and a loaded 6 burner gas BBQ - I just order a Kamado Joe Classic III and can't wait to start cooking! I picked up the Joetisserie as well as the DoJoe and have definitely been reading everyone's tips and tricks. Will post pics and cooks as they come!
  22. Good info thank you. PS what is a TTT?
  23. @Golf Griller, I cooked on my cracked firebox for months without any issue. And finally when it started looking like yours, I put in a warranty claim. After the replacement came, I cooked for several more months before I installed the replacement- still without any issue. The good news is, if you consider it so, you’ll be receiving one of the newer segmented fireboxes.
  24. I tried it but much prefer chewing on a few stalks than juicing them. I do know some people who swear by the stuff at a glass of day, on an empty stomach, every morning.
  25. Great meal. My first thought for this challenge was stuffed pork chops. I had already changed my plans to something different.
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...