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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/07/2022 in all areas

  1. jtemple

    My First Tomahawk

    seasoned with Kinder's "The Blend" (salt, pepper & garlic powder) 250 indirect with bourbon barrel chunks until the steak was about 122 degrees internal seared on soapstone at 600 This was the best steak I have made by a long shot.
    11 points
  2. New Orleans has a dish called barbeque shrimp, that's not done on a barbeque, but in a.sauce pan. Different restaurants have different versions of it, and it can vary widely. Check it out at Deany's in the French Quarter for a really good version. I like it, but it's messy to eat (shrimp are served head-on, shell-on in the best places. And, it's spicier than my family likes. So for Labor Day, I did a grilled shrimp that borrows from the New Orleans recipe, but isn't. And it can be done on a grill (Kamado in this case). I've simplified the list of ingredients and processes from the original concepts (no wine, no reduction, fewer spices), but this is definitely a dish to make your own way. I wanted to be sure that the fresh shrimp flavor came through, which is easy to lose (for me, at least) with too much spice heat. Some spices bring that out, though, so bay leaf and lemon juice are kept here. Fresh shrimp is a huge benefit, if you can get them. Well-taken-care-of frozen shrimp will also work ok, but not all frozen are well-taken-care-of. I wouldn't try this with low quality shrimp, just wouldn't be worth the effort. Ingredients 1 lb whole, fresh shrimp (see below) per person Worcestershire sauce Lemon juice Butter Olive or other mild cooking oil Bay leaf Salt Minced garlic I didn't measure much of anything in this cook, pretty much done by eye and taste. But it's pretty straightforward, and flexible. 1 pound whole shrimp is equivalent to ⅔ pound of peeled. So adjust to the appetites you're feeding. Also consider shrimp salad or a grilled shrimp poboy as leftovers, so a bit extra don't hurt. Head, peel, and de-vein the shrimp; put the heads and peelings in a stock pot with about 1 pint water per pound of whole shrimp. Add salt (other spices you like, Louisiana Shrimp Boil, Tony Cacherie's, Old Bay,etc., or at least a couple bay leaves), and boil about 10 minutes, stirring frequently. If you use one of the premixed spice blends, check to see if they include salt. Don't want to over salt! The water is not enough to submerge all the shrimp peels, stirring helps get it all cooked, and all the goodies extracted from the heads and peels. (You can make a larger quantity of stock, for this I want it pretty dense). Using 2 bowls, add some ice to the larger, pour a small amount of the stock into the smaller bowl (sitting in the larger). Let it chill. You want it cold, not warm, so you're not warming the shrimp. Add enough Worcestershire sauce to make it look like dirty water, medium dark brown. About ¼ to ⅓ of the volume of stock (yes, that's a lot). Add the shrimp to the mixture, let it soak at least 10 minutes, up to half an hour or so. The longer you go, though, the vinegar in the Worcestershire sauce will begin to denature the proteins (think ceviche, but vinegar instead of citrus). You can see some of that going on in the thinnest parts of the shrimp in the second pic. In this photo, I've made up too much marinade, which is a waste of good shrimp stock (liquid gold). Worcestershire sauce is a primary flavor in the classic dish, and the classic style has the shrimp cooked in a reduction of that, wine, and stock in a skillet. In this version, it's being used as a marinade, so not as strong a contributor. But again, trying to let the fresh shrimp shine through. The baste here is a combination of butter, oil, bay leaf and salt, warmed until the.butter sizzles, then add minced garlic and.remove from heat. Add lemon juice. Reserve some for dipping at the table, or pouring over the skewers then. The rest is used as a baste before putting on the grill, and supplementing that initial baste while it cooks. Skewer the shrimp, baste, cook to 130F minimum. Kamado in the 350-375F range, grill in upper position. Once the shrimp go on, it's an open-dome cook, turning the shrimp every couple minutes and moving them around to get an even cook along the skewers and between them. In this example, I ran final temp for the shrimp higher, around 155, as that's the preference of my consumers, but there's a trade-off in texture and flavor. Had a side of an eggplant with this, and some potato salad (not shown). Eggplant was just rubbed with oil, salted, and a little of Simon and Garfunkel rub from Amazing ribs.com. Started the eggplant a bit before the shrimp - they're pretty quick. It's a nice, quick cook with delish leftovers (including the extra shrimp stock - did I say I like that stuff?). Suggestioms for leftovers: grilled shrimp po-boy, shrimp salad....
    8 points
  3. Three large boneless, skinless chicken breasts pounded to about 3/4” uniform thickness. Marinated 4 hours in olive oil, minced garlic, Italian seasoning, red pepper flakes and S&P. First layer is a generous studding of soft goat cheese. Second layer is yellow onion in fine dice and sweet & spicy red cherry peppers in 1/2” dice. Third layer is baby spinach wilted for 2 minutes in the microwave with Tuscan herb-infused EVOO. Fourth layer is shredded mozzarella drizzled with the same infused EVOO. Roasted indirect @400* until juices run clear and the mozzarella is golden brown. Pulled and drizzled with the same infused EVOO and rested for 5 minutes. Simply plated with asparagus in lemon oil. Thanks for Looking and Happy Cooking.
    7 points
  4. JeffieBoy

    Lunch!

    Took my wife to an RMT appointment about 30km from home this morning. When she hobbled out afterwards the first thing she said was that she was starving and ready for early lunch. Directly across the street was a BBQ joint called the Lancaster Smokehouse. I pulled into the parking lot, walked into the restaurant and ordered a brisket sandwich for myself. It was more expensive than a quarter pound cheeseburger combo and didn’t include a drink but I felt it important to bite the bullet for you, loyal Guru viewer! Probably the best brisket sandwich I have had in several years (that I did not make myself). Let’s consider this research for future cooks. Look at those slices!
    6 points
  5. When I build a new house I'm going to find the guy that installed these windows and hire him to install mine.
    6 points
  6. Nice. I still have my Big Joe I that I purchased in 2014. I've replaced the firebox, gasket and the heat deflectors. It was on a stand but it became a stand alone when I made my patio.
    5 points
  7. Saw a couple things done with a Trompo and it's been fun coming up with new ways to use it. I'm looking idea and cooks. Here's last nights dinner. The blue you see is reflecting off a turquoise umbrella. It was pouring rain. Added in this order. Brats Salt Beer Dried Onions and Beans. Add the beans and stir it up with the pan liquor. Anyone else playing with a Trompo?
    5 points
  8. A couple three weeks ago, JackJumper did a cook he called "layered chicken breasts". I took his idea and did a follow up cook using his method but with chicken thighs, for dinner this evening. I used a blend of shiitake and baby bella mushrooms with prosciutto, along with sun dried tomatoes and sautéed mashed garlic and onions. For cheese I used a blend of aged gouda, herbed goat cheese and a little grated parmesan. For seasoning I used a liberal amount of McCormicks roasted garlic and herb blend. For a side I made a tomato salad with chocolate tomatoes and good mozzarella. It came out great, and presented quite well. My wife loved it, and said we needed to add it to the dishes we do for company. Here's some pics.
    4 points
  9. Here is my demo and first look review of the newest product from the ThermoPro line: The ThermoPro TempSpike! I have put this thermometer through it's paces over the last three weeks and I am super impressed with the results. If you have a need for a truly wireless bluetooth thermometer, I would give this one a try! The price is fantastic compared to others like it. Here's a link to this thermometer on Amazon: Here's a 20% off link for this device that is good until October 18, 2022: https://www.amazon.com/gp/mpc/A1LIFZ5JUSX517?maas=maas_adg_94397DBB0A579C9701F0CE2D991A6C81_afap_abs&ref_=aa_maas&tag=maas 20% off coupon code if using a desktop/web browser: 20MJBZGH After that, here is the link: https://amzn.to/3f5fnaP If you buy from the ThermoPro Website: https://buythermopro.com/?rfsn=6767091.d3c553 and use MANCAVEMEALS for an additional discount! This thermometer was provided to me by ThermoPro as part of their brand ambassador program of which I'm a member and participant. The opinions and review in this video are strictly my own personal opinions of this product. My personal philosophy about reviewing products such as this is simple. You will not likely ever see me review a product that I don't think is worth having #ThermoPro #ManCaveMeals
    4 points
  10. "Chef's Table - Pizza: Chris Bianco" is the hour long first episode of a new Netflix streaming series. I had no idea when I clicked on it, what it would be like, and it ended up being probably the very best single thing I have seen about food, cooking, and how it relates to life. I watched it with my wife, and believe it or not, we both had lumps in our throats and tears in our eyes. Truly an amazing widow into a man's art and his life. The big bonus is that I also learned quite a bit about cooking and pizza in general. I would be surprised if anyone who is into cooking would not have the same reaction as my wife and I did. Enjoy, IMO it is well worth the hour you will spend watching. Enjoy
    4 points
  11. 9yrs later the classic is still making yummy food.. So far no issues with this thing. Only thing replaced so far is the gasket this past year. Use the Joe quite a bit too. Firebowl cracked maybe 6yrs back- have the replacement for it but never swapped it out. Broke heat deflector few cooks back using pizza stone as deflector. Didn't realize how expensive things have gotten
    4 points
  12. Continuing my experiments with cooking fish and seafood high in the dome, this time I tried Steelhead filet in a garlic laced thick teriyaki glaze. The dome thermometer read 425* and the fish was cooked indirect to an IT of 115*. Here are some photos: -A thick side of fresh Steelhead from Costco. -A large portion rubbed with lemon-infused EVOO and sprinkled with smoked paprika. -Pulled from the Joe Jr. when the IT hit 115*. -Plated and sauced with a commercially prepared thick teriyaki laced with fresh garlic run through a garlic press. -Garnished with scallion greens, a little cilantro, sesame seeds, cucumber spears marinated in rice vinegar and radish. Thanks for Looking and Happy Cooking.
    4 points
  13. Fish taco Tuesday dinner was whipped up on the fly after a quick run to the grocer to pick up the tilapia. Seasoned the fish with a Zatarain’s Blackened Seasoning and heated some EVOO in the Lodge skillet on the induction cooktop. Pan fried over medium-high heat for about 3-4 minutes per side. Coleslaw was pre-packaged and my wife mixed it with mayo and Chipotle Cholula hot sauce. Gave the corn shells a quick char on the grill and dinner was ready! Delicious! Only took about 15 minutes, not including the run to the store.
    4 points
  14. This smoked cream cheese fad is one that just keeps on rolling. I think I have found the PERFECT sauce to top it with in this homemade pineapple passion fruit preserves with bourbon and habanero peppers. The recipe for that sauce is here: 1 tablespoon of butter 1 finely diced habanero pepper 1 13oz jar of Bonne Maman Pineapple Passion Fruit Preserves 1/4 cup bourbon 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1/4 teaspoon salt. Melt the butter over medium high heat in a saucepan. Add the habaneros and reduce the heat to medium. Stir the habaneros fairly constantly for 5 minutes or so. Add the rest of the ingredients, keep stirring until it's all combined, and let come to a slow simmer. Reduce the heat to low and let it simmer for 10 minutes uncovered. Remove it from the heat, put a lid on it, and just let it sit until you are ready to serve. You can make this in advance, put it back in a jar in the fridge, and just reheat it before you serve. Enjoy! #ManCaveMeals #KamadoJoe #SmokedCreamCheese
    4 points
  15. I went to 4 stores today looking for the decaf diet ginseng green tea Mrs. Boater prefers. Found 1 gallon total. But in compensation, one store had a sign, apologizing that their advertised price for baby back ribs ($2.99/lb.) was wrong. They were $2.49. I told them that I accepted their apology, and grabbed some Made up (in my mind,at least) for the lack of tea. And they had a bunch of other tea jugs. Just not the one I was looking for.
    4 points
  16. When I reverse sear I just do it on an open grill close to the fire.. no flavorings I like my steak ..steak flavored, but thats just me.
    4 points
  17. Keeperoftheflame's recent post about the green egg wireless grill dome thermometer got me back on the hunt for one. I often wished for a wireless dome thermometer that replaced the factory one on my akorn jr so that I could monitor grill temps and know when to go start turning down vents while I was inside prepping food, etc. I had looked for one a couple years ago with no luck whatsoever. Didn't appear anyone made such a contraption although it seems like a fairly simple and useful idea. I love my ink bird 4 probe blue tooth thermometer but don't get it out unless I'm needing to monitor meat temps. Did a quick search after reading about Keeper's and found this: XPX Bluetooth Digital Charcoal Grill Thermometer, Smart Alarm Digital Instant Read Thermometer with 2 Probes | Grill Parts America I actually found it on amazon at a price of $25.99. Never heard of that brand but for the price had to at least try it. Received it a couple days ago and had a chance to use tonight while cooking a leg of lamb. I set up my ink bird probes to check accuracy and the XPX pretty much dead on. In addition to the dome thermometer it has ports for two wired probes which are included. Install is a snap. It comes with aluminum plate heat deflector to go between the unit and your grill which I did not use. Besides being god awful ugly, when in place I barely had any thread engagement for the wingnut inside the dome. Ran the grill up to 550 or so and the back side of the unit was nice and cool even w/o the deflector. Here's a couple pics installed and in use: Worked perfectly. It has a decent app that tracks and graphs temps as well as set limits for alarms, etc. Still playing with it but looks and feels like the ink bird app. Blue tooth works decent but does not have as good of range as the ink bird. My biggest dislike is that it takes AAA batteries and not rechargeable. Overall though I am very satisfied with it. We'll have to see how long it lasts. At 25 bucks I don't have high expectations. BTW, the leg of lamb turned out delicious:
    3 points
  18. Got the new redesigned Kamado Joe basket. This seems to have all of the same good design features of the first one but not painted. Looks like it can hold a lot of wings which is the main reason I purchased it. Also looks easy to clean. Two benefits over the Napoleon basket. I plan on doing wings tomorrow. Hopefully it’s a successful cook.
    3 points
  19. I've done around 20 different cooks in my new Blaze. In comparing it to my old Kamado Joe I have found several differences. The Blaze doesn't get as hot as the KJ. I could get it up to 750 compared to over 900 in the KJ. The Blaze cooks more evenly across the grids. There are no hot or cold areas on the grate If I let it burn out there is nothing but fine white ash remaining. The kJ always leaves some unburnt coals. I think it's because the draw is different. In the KJ air comes from underneath, In the Blaze it comes across the top of the coals. In the KJ I used the double racks and half moons more often. The lower rack in Blaze is more functional. Finally you can burn your hand on the Blaze handle wear a glove it gets hot. Not true on the KJ. Both do a great job
    3 points
  20. Vision Kamado just past the three year anniversary. The hairline crack shown on page two has not progressed. The lava stone(deflector) is still in tact. Today I am using the fogo blaze ball, earned enough fogo points, it was free. Really free, they paid the shipping. There have been some recent posts by people struggling to maintain low temps, like 225. Small fire, people. Close those vents down early. blaze ball, meathead lump, short ribs.
    3 points
  21. Hard to find chicken breasts with rib bones. Used to be buying a larger size or in bulk was cheaper. I have seen that sizing more more expensive many times. Want to eat less processed, no sugar added stuff?. Be prepared to pay way more.
    3 points
  22. Hey Folks, BGE sends me a quarterly email with new innovations, cooking techniques, recipes, and such. One of the items in their recent email was this newly developed blue tooth dome thermometer with an Ap for your phone. Looks pretty cool. BGE wants 99.99 for it. https://biggreenegg.com/product/external-bluetooth-temperature-gauge/?utm_medium=email&_hsmi=226207945&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-97Aui_4IbweWKcGApc0QDw0KWw5HHtTB4IGIKOc36XmSHZA2qu6cW6u-a6gYBjRe_9ZPXKBuGuJcKWG4IxrujHpB8vAw&utm_content=226207945&utm_source=hs_email
    3 points
  23. Marinated cubed pork in soy sauce, Sirachji, Mae Ploy sweet chili and rice vinegar. Took a cast iron wok and put it on the lower shelf with no plates let it heat and stir fried the pork. The aqua hue reflection is from my umbrella. It's raining again. Added butter, stir fried rice and water Let it cook down and in went the veggies Served with cashews halves as a condiment. I'm really liking this Kamado.
    3 points
  24. I prefer to sear using my soapstone, but also have just done direct over the fire on a low grate. On the soapstone, my favorite fat to use for searing is fat from whatever I'm cooking. Say I'm cooking a strip steak or ribeye, there's plenty of fat in the cap that can be trimmed back. Toss a couple pieces on the searing surface when you're ready and you're good to go. I like to do the same thing when I'm using cast iron on the stove top, I'll cook down a couple pieces of fat before adding the meat. I suppose you could save fat/tallow from something like a brisket and freeze it until you need it too, but that just seems likes more work to me.
    3 points
  25. Just heard the Queen of England has passed away. Compared to the clowns we have here in politics and the clowns in the royal family she was the pinnacle of class and dignity she will not be replaced. God bless the queen
    3 points
  26. Interesting. I had heard of "dry brining" beef, but never before onions ,,, Off to the grocery store to try it!!
    3 points
  27. TKOBBQ

    Oklahoma onion burgers

    Oklahoma Onion Burgers You'll need a flat top or flat griddle plus a rigid turner to make these burgers perfectly. Makes five double burgers. INGREDIENTS 2 lb Lone Mountain Wagyu (or similar) ground beef 1 large white onion 10 slices of American cheese 5 Martin's brand (or similar) potato rolls 2 tsp salt plus extra for burger seasoning. Spray oil INSTRUCTIONS 1. At least an hour prior to cooking, start by finely slicing the onion, and placing slices in a bowl. Sprinkle with 2 tsp salt and allow to sit, mixing occasionally for about an hour. This will help draw out excess moisture and help the onions to brown faster. You need to make sure your slices are thin, because the onions are only going to have a few minutes to cook, and if they're too chunky they may remain raw in the middle. 2. Line a tray with greaseproof paper. Divide the meat into 10 portions, loosely forming each portion into a ball, then place onto the lined tray. These can go back into the fridge until about 10-15 minutes before you are ready to use them. 3. Light your grill and place the flat griddle on top, allowing it to heat to a high temperature. 4. Place onions in a dishcloth (paper towel will fall apart too easily) and wring them until you've removed the bulk of the moisture. Now, you're ready! 5. Spray the hot griddle with a little oil, and place smalls handful of onions in little stacks, allowing yourself enough room to flip the burgers. I was able to do 5-6 per batch. 6. After about 3-4 minutes of browning, place a ball of beef on top of each stack and using your turner, slowly but firmly press the ball down onto the onions to form a patty that should be less than 1/2 inch thick. You may need to press them a second time to reach the desired thickness. Repeat until all onion stacks now have a smashed patty on top, and allow to cook a further 2-3 minutes. 7. Using your turner, get a good solid scrape and flip the burgers to cook the other side. The majority of the onions should have adhered to the beef. Allow to cook on the other side 2-3 minutes. If you prefer your cheese to be meltier, layer it on top of each patty as soon as they are flipped. Otherwise, wait until 30 seconds before you take them off the griddle. 8. Halve the buns in preparation for stacking, and have them on a tray nearby. Remove the burgers from the grill and stack onto the waiting bun bases. Put the bun top in place, eat and enjoy!
    3 points
  28. Whoever told you that at Kamado Joe simply doesn't know what they are talking about and I'll stand behind that 100%. I was a part of the Kamado Joe team when this was developed and my instruction here IS EXACTLY HOW the system is designed to work. You can put the heat shields on the x-rack if you like. It's not a huge deal either way I suppose. "Are you not supposed to be able to put the deflectors on the lower lip of the DnC?" No. It was NOT designed to work this way. This is why I made the video I made. People were actually cutting off the hooks on the charcoal basket so they could MAKE it work that way.
    3 points
  29. Dkorm

    New member

    Finally bought my grill I always wanted, just never had the extra money for one. Bought the KAMADO Joe classic 2. Had a Weber, nice grill. Everything comes out better on the Kamado. Thinking the lump has a lot to do with it. Still learning, definitely enjoying it. Picked up the Fireboard controller with it. Appreciate everyone, lot of great stuff going on. Many thanks!
    2 points
  30. I just thought there might be some interest in this if it is not already posted. It is different than anything that I have come across and certainly adaptable to the kamado. Hope you like it.
    2 points
  31. fltsfshr

    Wing Sauce

    Thought I'd share this. This recipe is from the man who started Buffalo Chips. He's no longer with us but his recipe still follows. 1/2 butter & 1/2 Franks hot sauce. All he would vary was the heat from mild to hot to suicide and death. Made them today and they disappeared as fast as I could get them off the Kamado. His place is still in business. Thanks Al.
    2 points
  32. GS1397

    KJ Classic vs XL Oval

    Hey Guys, appreciate all the responses. I ended up going with the KJ Classic 2 mainly b/c of price. My Costco had it for $799 and that included the D&C 2 tier system with the deflector plates, grate tool, ash tool and a cover. I went this past weekend and they had 2 left that were now down to $600. Anyway, very happy with my purchase. Appreciate all the input here.
    2 points
  33. Hello friends, I 'm back. Some burgers with homemade caraway buns and asian variations chicken with hoisin sauce and stirfryed noodles
    2 points
  34. Cooked wings today. The new basket worked great. Fits a lot of wings. Easy to load. Haven’t cleaned it yet. I should have sprayed it with oil first. Probably would make it easier to clean.
    2 points
  35. A.O.

    PORK!!

    So I said I would report back on the loin pulling so here we go The meat in question.. Partially pulled And done And a close up So one observation to make about this whole cook in general, ribs and loin, was that the addition of the water bath seemed to make both pieces of meat drier than normal.. no clue as to why.
    2 points
  36. Meater is fine in a metal smoker. A friend of mine uses his in his stainless gasser and his metal pellet grill. It can be used in ovens and even sous vide.
    2 points
  37. Thanks guys. Also thanks to John for the informative book- lots to learn! I realise my previously posted pics were a bit slapdash- previous post has an 8 hour smoked lamb shoulder. Probably cooked around 250-280 degrees. Wrapped in foil about 5 hours in. Took it off about 197 internal and it pulled very well. Would probably give it a bit longer next time so that it was probing about 200 all over. But it was delicious and made a ragu and a Xinjiang lamb noodle soup with the lamb leftovers in the week after. Other pic is off an attempt at chicken and pork Shwarmas. Stuck the skewers in potatoes so the meat would stand up and cook. Probably cooked for about 15 mins at 500 (roughly!). Finally, attached another pic of pizza cooked last night. Put the diffuser on the grill then placed a pizza steel on firebrick above the diffuser. As mentioned yesterday it was hot- damn hot- 650 f. Cooked in about 8 minutes...doesn't seem to have melted any gaskets so I would do that again and might try some more tandoor type items at that heat.
    2 points
  38. Hello fellow bbq peeps. Bought an akorn about 9 months ago. Dealing with the learning curve for low and slow but loving the process. Have charcoaled grilled plenty of spatchcocked chooks, steaks, prawns etc. Starting to trust the dome thermometer more and that is helping me with longer cooks. Cranked up up to 650farenheit for pizza tonight. Turned out great. Cooked quickly and with great woodfired flavour. Plenty to always think about with improving my next cooks even when it goes well. Looking forward to hearing some great bbq recipes from U dudes
    2 points
  39. @jark87 "To Thine Own Self, and to Thine Own Technology, Be True!" As long as you reliably wind up with "another delicious cook," 150% of the gee-gaws are secondary. Experience is always the best teacher. You very simply need: "A Process." I think that the essential idea is simply: that: "Yes, you do need an external-reading 'lid-closed' thermometer to inform your [grilling] process." Without which you are "flying blind." Only if you know(!) what the Food is right-now doing, can you possibly predict ... nor anticipate ... nor ever hope to control ...the outcome. You need a device that does not require you to open the grill lid, nor the kitchen stove, nor even the stovetop cast-iron skillet, in order to know ... in real time ... what is actually going on in that hot box.
    2 points
  40. As stated by @MikeRobinson above, you can find inexpensive “wireless” thermometers just about anywhere. I have one I bought on Amazon - probably paid about what is indicated above - something less than $50. It seems to do just as good of a job as my Thermoworks Smoke. They both have 2 wired probes, 1 for the grate to measure ambient temp and the other to measure internal temp of the food. Those probes plug into a unit that sits next to the grill and transmits temp to a wireless unit so I can monitor remotely, but I have stay within range of the unit next to the grill - about 150’. There are other, more expensive devices that will connect to an app which can give you access to the temps from anywhere. And then there are true wireless probes, like Meater that have both a meat sensor and ambient sensor all in 1 probe and there are no wires at all. The probe sends a wireless signal to another device which is connected to the internet/app. To me, that’s the best solution, but I still haven’t bought one. I’m less dependent on my probes than I used to be, as I’ve learned what to expect with different cooks and mostly just rely on an instant read thermometer. Yes, I have to raise the lid, but it takes less than 30 seconds to get a reading in multiple spots. My Kamado is so efficient, I don’t lose any cooking temp, at least not the way I would on my offset or Kettle. I’ve just gotten lazy with the wired probes. I find them to be a pain, especially after the cook when I have to clean them and put them back in the case.
    2 points
  41. Thank you @jark87. Yep, me, too; I'm always looking for some way to make chicken breast flavorful. In fact, this is my first chicken cook in months because I'd gotten so bored with my efforts. I adapted this prep from a recipe calling only for cream cheese and unseasoned spinach. Wilting the spinach in a drizzle of infused EVOO adds a layer of flavor. By substituting goat cheese and adding onion and sweet pepper, I changed the flavor profile of the base layer. The creamy goat cheese against the piquant cherry peppers (to which I think I have become addicted) really makes the dish something special. Next time, I think I'll add a little shredded Romano, also a tangy goat cheese, to the mozzarella, just to up the flavor of the topping.
    2 points
  42. One of the interesting things is the vertical rod conducts heat. You will find that anything that gets stuck on it cooks around it on the inside too. If you are using an it probe be sure it's in the middle between the rod and the outside edge of what you are making. Here's a couple other cooks I've tried on it.
    2 points
  43. Our house is approximately 80 years old and last summer I tore off all the eavestroughs, facia and soffit in order to reinstall fresh wood and new aluminum trough etc. In tearing off the wood so that I could check the joists behind them I must’ve removed close to 200 dried out wasp nests that has accumulated over those 80 summers. Every time I pulled off a board I dreaded the fact that I was going to find a fresh yellow jacket nest, but thankfully I found only one or two. This year we had a noticeable reduction in yellow jackets around the house I believe because the house is now sealed up better than it’s been in decades.
    2 points
  44. Excellent cook, and a very informative post. Great post.
    2 points
  45. fltsfshr

    Cast Iron Cubans

    Panini pressed on the Kamado. Tampa version because it has salami in it.
    2 points
  46. Last year was "the year of the hornets." They invaded an out-of-service beehive and the eaves of my house. "Wasps are bad, but hornets are b&stards." They will actually "fly combat air patrols" around their nests and pour out in large numbers to attack you before you get there. I had to put on my bee suit in order to blast them, which of course poisoned the beehive box. (I had to burn it.) I could see them aiming directly for my face, only to be stopped by the hood of the suit. I sprayed the entire contents of a room fogger through a piece of PVC pipe to take out the nest in the eaves. Then I washed the suit three times.
    2 points
  47. If I'm doing nice thick steaks like rib or tomahawks, I have taken to doing sous vide. I get my kamado screaming hot, drop the grate as close to the coal as I can get it and slap it on for a few seconds each side. Beautiful crust and wall to wall pink.
    2 points
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