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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/17/2021 in all areas

  1. Saw this new food truck using a XL BGE on my way to the barber yesterday. Pretty cool, I saw it about 9 in the morning, and it smelled like they were cooking pork butts for the lunch rush, smelled amazing. I am going to have to check it out.
    7 points
  2. A beautiful Chilean Sea Bass steak from Costco, rubbed with lemon-infused EVOO, grilled skin-side-down on the Joe Jr. at 450* to an IT of 100*. Brushed halfway with prepared Yuzu Miso sauce (I've made the sauce from scratch several times and still prefer the commercially prepared version). Plated with a base of the warmed sauce seasoned with crushed coriander seed, soft pink peppercorn and Maldon salt flakes. Garnished with cilantro and lemon wedges. Yum!! Thanks for Looking and Happy Cooking.
    6 points
  3. dman

    Football and fish?

    Why not! Fresh halibut, skin on, and fresh crab cakes. On the Classic at 350. Sautéed some garlic in butter and drizzled over the fish. Crab cakes on my half moon griddle with butter infused EVOO then topped with the rest of the garlic butter mixture. Delicious!
    6 points
  4. So for the challenge this month, I figured I should pay homage to my beloved Cowboys. No, not the Dallas ones….the University of Wyoming Cowboys. So Cowboy Beans it is…. Started off cooking some turkey bacon to have for later. Sautéed extra lean ground turkey, hatch chiles, serranos and onions. Added in the turkey bacon. Then the beans and brown sugar, mustard and BBQ sauce. Let it simmer. Added some chile flake to bring it up a bit. And some Meat Church Holy Voodoo. Thickened up nicely. Simply dished up. Not sure the Cowboys would approve of my turkey substitution, but this was quite tasty.
    6 points
  5. philpom

    Top Loin Steak

    A fantastic steak if cooked correctly aka rare. These turned out very tender and juicy. Salt and pepper over a hot fire. Placed on the grate cold. Served on the fine china as always.
    6 points
  6. I trimmed up an 11 lb brisket and it goes into the kamado around midnight and based on the last two sessions I expected it will reach stall/wrapping temp around 8ish. Alarm wake me up about 6:50 to help get my daughter ready for school. Took a look on the Fireboard dashboard and saw the prob temp at 189. Immediately freaked out. Got butcher paper ready, wrapped and put it back into the smoker in 10 minutes. Got my daughter on her way and took a look at the phone again and it says 135F? WTH? I took the Thermapen out and tested a few spots and the temp is indeed at the mid 130s. Unwrapped, put it back to continue cooking. I checked the historical chart and at no point in time after I put the brisket in initially, the probe temp has exceeded the current high. To summarize and lessons learned: - Don't trust your eyes when you are sleepy and not wearing glasses. - Double check temp with thermometer before next step in the process
    5 points
  7. Excellent! Now it’s time for Rebels vs Tide!
    5 points
  8. Roasted a nice little 3lb chicken with potatoes, carrots, onions, and celery last night. Came out great, and my wife and I enjoyed half of it. After dinner I sliced up the remaining breast and pulled the meat off the bone. I set my 8" Global on the bottom edge of the cutting board, and started to put the chicken in a ziplock on it's way to the fridge. The zip lock bag caught the handle of my knife and sent it off the cutting board and sliding off the edge of the granite counter and down to the floor blade first. The tip struck me directly in the top of my foot, cutting right through the top of my shoe and penetrating my foot. Stabbed me pretty good, but missed the veins on the top of my foot, and didn't need stitches. None the less it scared the heck out of me. After the incident and no serious damage to my foot, I laughed at thinking at least the tip didn't hit the ceramic tile and break, I love that knife. Be careful out there
    5 points
  9. We had a family trip down to Dumfries & Galloway earlier this week and took the Joe Junior... but we arrived to find the cottage already had a kettle bbq so probably could have got away with just using that! Nah... I wanted to take the baby kamado on its first road trip There was a lovely butchers in the nearest village who provided some tasty meat - a couple of thick cut ribeye (about 1.5-2") steaks and about 1kg of pork loin. I really wanted pork shoulder but I had to take what he had in stock that day. I had a simple salt, black pepper, thyme, and marjoram rub in mind for the steak and something a bit more considered for the pork. The area is famous (at least here in Scotland) for its beef and the forequarter that greeted me when I walked into the butchers did not disappoint! He was off to cull some deer later that week but sadly we'd be away before he had fresh venison in stock :( First evening's meal was reverse seared steak - with the grill running at about 250 F with a foil pouch filled with oak shavings (from the logs I was burning in the woodburner inside). I took them to 49 C internal and then got inferno mode (thanks Smoking Dad BBQ!) going to sear them on the CI plate. I really could have taken the griddle plate hotter but we were hungry. Served with some fries and broccoli. While doing the low & slow part of the reverse sear, I also threw a peeled head of garlic on to smoke for the following night's meal. I've worked out I can mock up a double diffuser in the Junior to help protect the underside of my cooks from too much direct heat. I use the little baby heat diffuser, directly sitting on the kick ash basket handles and then place my CI griddle on top of the upper part of the firebox. I don't use the Joe Junior rack & diffuser holder thing. I then place the SS cooking grid on top of my CI griddle which raises the meat just enough away from the hotter CI surface. Requires a bit of fiddling but seems to work and definitely protects against the heat that left the underside of my first couple of spatchcock chickens a bit toasty. The second dinner the following night was roast pork loin at the request of my daughter (sausages for my son who wanted his pork in a different format!) stuffing balls, a smoked garlic sweet potato mash and the rest of the broccoli. I also made a quick gravy back inside for the pork as I find loin dries out quite easily, even when treated carefully. I butterflied the loin out, put a herb rub and lay so rashers of Ayrshire middle bacon over it and then rolled back up. I diamonded the good top covering of the fat and got it on the grill at about 250 F with the intention to let it rise to about 300 over the cook. After 20-25 minutes I added the sausages and stuffing balls and took the internal temp to about 165 for the loin. I needed to quickly sear the fat for presentation purposes but otherwise was happy with the cook. So, four cooks in now with the Joe Junior and it feels to be going well - I'm loving the stability of the temperatures so far. We have Korean/Japanese/English friends coming over tomorrow and I'm planning on doing teriyaki pork ribs and beef short ribs. Building up slowly to probably a pork shoulder towards the end of the month!
    4 points
  10. I had a package of ground chicken and decided to do something a little out of the ordinary. Turkish Kofte are usually made with ground beef or lamb, why not chicken? I followed this recipe for the ingredients https://www.giverecipe.com/homemade-turkish-meatballs/, and then cooked the meatballs on the Joe. I did them indirect at 350, 10 minutes a side, then direct 5 minutes a side to a IT of 166. The Tzatziki recipe I like is: 1 Large Cucumber, peeled, seeded and shredded 3 garlic cloves mashed in a mortar and pestle with 1 teaspoon of salt 2 cups whole milk plain Greek yogurt 1 T chopped fresh dill 1 T chopped fresh mint 1 T good olive oil Drain the shredded cucumber, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Mix everything together and refrigerate for 1 hour for the flavors to marry. Serve as a bed for Kofte or as a dip with pita bread triangles. The picture of the salad before mixing is pretty much the recipe: 1 can chickpeas, red bell pepper, celery, red onion and flat leaf parsley with a red wine vinegar vinaigrette. It made a nice light lunch.
    4 points
  11. Yikes, I've been doing this all wrong for the past 30+ years...
    4 points
  12. 4 points
  13. I tried something a little different today...i made some biegnets. These were almos perfect. Imwill try it again and get it absolutely perfect...
    4 points
  14. Saw a post for this from @Jack , we really like our veggies and gave it a whirl. Served with a skillet seared steak, all done on the Primo. We made our own herbs de Provence and included squash, Zucchini, egg plant, tomato and white onion. Very delicious!
    4 points
  15. A.O.

    Ceiling issues?

    Just for fun, or maybe to show off a little is my set up, I built it with outside cooking in mind. Its a cabana for my pool with an extended bit of concrete to put my cooker on out from under the roof with the idea I can pull it under the roof in inclement weather. It does have a ceiling fan to disperse the smoke, cool me down , and blow away the flies. I have also mounted an umbrella that I can swing over the hot tub, or swivel it over the cooker to shield me from rain or the blazing sun in the summer.. here's a couple pics
    4 points
  16. 4 points
  17. Back to the original topic - pictures. Travelling right now and came across an old carding mill in Nova Scotia.
    4 points
  18. Dinner was good.
    4 points
  19. This thread has gone far enough. We have established the fact that ceramic grills can crack. There is no need to continue pointless discussion on it. If the original poster had some intent with this thread other than re-establishing a well known fact, please let me know what it was. This is a Kamado forum and a majority of the people here are using ceramic kamados. If you are going to invent a new product that will win over all the ceramic kamado owners, let us see it when it's ready for testing.
    4 points
  20. No, looks like we just miss them, we are in Zone 8 and the info on line says Fox Tail ferns grow in Zones 9-11. We have a number of interesting plants but all them are plants that grow in arid climates. Here's a few desert willow This tree grow natively and has orchid like blooms in spring and summer. Gopher plant This plant is great, nobody eats it ad it has beautiful yellow flowers in the spring Claret cup cactus This cactus gets beautiful Burgundy colored flowers in the spring Apache Plume starts off with white flowers and then develops pinkish plumes Strawberry cactus
    4 points
  21. I have finalized cheddar cheese Ciabatta recipe. Earlier in week I did pilot test run and for actual batch change I made was also to add some extra shredded cheddar cheese on top. Ciabatta method used was Poolish method, and I used 25 % cheddar cheese half was cubed and half shredded. This recipe is now family favourite.
    4 points
  22. Herman Munster

    My Short Ribs

    My Short Ribs took 4 hours . I buy them as slab. Trim them season them and cook @ 250-275 . I don't turn them . Just like butter . Herman
    4 points
  23. Braai Joe

    Hello from Melbourne!

    Hello from Melbourne, Australia! Being a South African I've grown up grilling (braaing we call it) on open wood and charcoal fires - it's a national past time and something just in our DNA! After much reading I decided to add to the versatility and go for a BIG JOE! Just a note to introduce and also to give a huge shout out to all the members who's contributions have been invaluable in making the decision and ensuring that the bug has bitten! John Setzler, ckreef, Jack., keeperovdeflame, KismetKamado, Ben S etc. you are all an awesome source of knowledge, tips and ideas. And - 1st steaks were great, but the whole chicken next was out of this world. Very excited to get stuck into it and "braai" on my Joe! Cheers, James
    3 points
  24. 3 points
  25. Inspired by @Jack and his grilled sea bass. Recipe is from the Stay at Home Chef, link pasted below. In summary, glazed the halibut with melted butter, honey, minced garlic, lemon juice, soy sauce and ground black pepper. I hit it with a light sprinkle of Lane’s Scorpion seasoning, which was the only deviation from the recipe. My wife isn’t a huge fan of fish, but she really liked this rendition. Grilled at 500° on 2 cedar planks until fish hit 145°. I tried to go direct for the last minute or so to crisp the skin, but the skin stuck to the grate. :-( I used 2 cedar planks because my fire was so hot from the grilled veggie mixture, courtesy of Chef Eric on the KJ YouTube channel (see below). Too bad I couldn’t get a picture of the flambé action on the veggies, powered by Bulleit Rye, but they were absolutely fantastic and I highly recommend the recipe. It’s fun and easy. https://thestayathomechef.com/grilled-halibut/
    3 points
  26. I use a Kick Ash Basket. When I am getting ready to start a new cook, I just shake the basket. Any ashes and small bits of charcoal that fall out are cleaned out of the grill and I just add new charcoal on top. I've never had any problem with the fire being snuffed out.
    3 points
  27. First off just wanted to say thanks for the book John. I have watched a lot of your videos and follow you on FB. I am still very new at this type of grill. I got a Kamado Joe Classic 1 for my birthday present this year. It was a total surprise from my gf. She knew I loved smoking but my smoker was reaching the end of life and it was just an electric smoker. Don't get me wrong it was good but from what I have learned and read thus far about Kamado Joe its a lot better this way. I am hoping to find answers to my questions as well has help for issues I am having or may have and to do the same for others.
    3 points
  28. Well, I need my reading glasses now and I will be sending in my AARP membership fee for the first time.
    3 points
  29. Bailey you have me chuckling all i can say is been there done that. Mine is age related.
    3 points
  30. TarterSauce12

    Overkill?

    First post so I hope this is alright to post some cooking jokes. Overkill to fire up the big joe for 4 hot dogs some would say? Nay say I! Sure love building a fire. Also would like to say I got my Joe in July and this place has been great for information! Best purchase I’ve ever made with a grill. PS. I’m from eastern North Carolina and my fiancé told me that we still had some bright leaf red dogs in the freezer (we didn’t), only reason those dogs are brown!
    3 points
  31. Until the changes in the college football conferences it was always interesting in my house on the day after Thanksgiving when the Big 8 match up would be Colorado vs Nebraska. I grew up in Colorado and spent some time at the University of Colorado. My wife grew up in Nebraska and NU football is king there. Anyway, my sports team theme is a college match up. No, I'm not doing Ralphie on the Joetisserie. I was able to get some bison back ribs from Nebraska Bison. Here is one rack ready for the rub. I was almost out of BGE ancho chile and coffee rub, so I added some more ancho chile powder, some finely ground coffee, and some mustard powder to the BGE rub. The rub was enough to fully cover the ribs. I got the grill up to temp and it held a solid 240* for the 4 hour cook. After about 3 hours the ribs were starting to probe tender, so I wrapped them with some sauce for additional flavor. Mrs. GG went to a farmer's stand and purchased some fresh corn on the cob. With the corn home, she was the person to husk it. After half an hour wrapped, the ribs were unwrapped and put back on the grill to tack up. The ribs were taken off the grill and a heat deflector was removed so the grill's temperature could rise. When it was up to about 350* - 400* the corn was put on to roast. A red wine was chosen to go with the ribs And the plated shot . . . I also took over a rib and an ear of corn to our neighbor who enjoys what I grill. His son only does burgers on the grill. In my mind the star of the show were the ribs, but the corn had a strong back-up role.
    3 points
  32. Golf Griller

    Overkill?

    There is no such thing as overkill when grilling. I've been known to grill two Italian sausages when we are having spaghetti and sausage for dinner.
    3 points
  33. Yikes, push things to the back of the counter!
    3 points
  34. len440

    Overkill?

    No such thing as too small amount of food on the grill. I've fired mine up for marshmallows for the grand daughters, once they say please with the bag in one hand an the forks in the other you can't say no.
    3 points
  35. deity6667

    My Short Ribs

    Mine normally take 8-10 hours - in fact I just took these off the grill - heading for tacos
    3 points
  36. Jack.

    Summer Vegetable Tian

    A French Provencal dish of eggplant, zucchini, squash and tomatoes sliced in 1/4" rounds, seasoned with shaved garlic, shaved shallots, Herbs de Provence and EVOO. Baked covered @ 400* for 1 hour then uncovered for 1/2 hour. Sprinkled with shredded Parmesan when hot out of the oven. This dish is easily adapted to a kamado. I wanted to use a round ceramic dish, so to avoid discoloration, I used the indoor oven. This dish makes a delicious side for chicken, fish, pork, or eggs. Very lo cal, too. Thanks for looking and Happy Cooking.
    3 points
  37. dman

    Foil boat pork loin

    Small loin perfect for two. Seasoned and let come to temp while I fire up the Classic. Half hour to get to 335, small chunk of mesquite and an hour later, ready to eat! Easy Sunday meal, with leftovers for Cubanos.
    3 points
  38. This is an inappropriate response here. It's not helpful in any way. Please be mindful when responding to questions and problems and don't make it personal.
    3 points
  39. Reviving an older thread but I made John’s Atlanta Brisket recipe yesterday. holy $&#% I love brisket but this was some other thing. The meat is so tender and juicy, the sauce is like dessert. My wife and I ate at least twice our normal meal in just brisket. And for the record this was a thin 4 pound cut I pulled from the freezer (had to freeze it because of some confusion a few weeks ago) so it was in no way ideal. I can’t believe it will be better from my normal butcher but it will.
    2 points
  40. I generally find that "things are a good bit more forgiving than you fear." Watch the oven temperature as it rises up ... taking care that it does not rise up too far, too fast. And, throughout it all, watch the meat temperature. "Yes, all of us have horror stories" where the oven temperature suddenly went through the roof – perhaps due to melted fat dumping down onto the charcoal – and thus ruining everything.
    2 points
  41. daninpd

    Cavatini Recipe?

    I had never heard of Cavatini before and it sounds like Pizza Hut originated it combining "Cavatelli" and "Rotini" (or one of the Italian "inis") to make a unique dish. Googling it brings up a ton of recipes including a "Cowboy Cavatini" https://www.crecipe.com/cowboy+cavatini+recipe+for+school+lunch+recipes that @KismetKamadomight want to look at.
    2 points
  42. 5 hours between 260 and 280° No time for proper plating!
    2 points
  43. A big element of the Japanese culture is their skill and love for gardening and creating beautiful, tranquil, and thoughtful outdoor spaces. Only figures then, that they would make some fine gardening blades, as well the many other blades they create. Our property has a lot of wild native high desert mountain growth that we have shaped into a garden. I am constantly lopping this and pruning that. A good clean cutting pruning saw is an essential tool. I also use power driven saws, clippers, and whackers, but continue to use a hand saw for fine work. I have seen these saws hanging on the wall of the Stihl shop where I take my chain saws and such for service. Almost $200 for a fine pruning saw is a bit much for even a blade enthusiast, so I have left them hanging their for quite a while, but today I bit the bullet. The saw's logo is Silky, and now that I have used it, I can attest to that fact.
    2 points
  44. A little while ago, my Dad's "ostentatious gas grill" finally blew a hose, and I seized the opportunity to show him that "something far better now existed." After dutifully taking him to hardware stores where he could consider "The Big Green Egg®," I took him to Lowe's where we bought – an "Akorn Senior." Yes, "this one's bigger," but otherwise it's basically the same: insulated steel body, cast iron grate, "and a few extras." After showing him how to properly season cast iron, which he correctly did, and after acquiring another remote-reading wireless thermometer at Home Depot, we have since enjoyed many "grilling weekends" together. (He's becoming quite good at it ...) "These are the times to remember, for they will not last forever ..."
    2 points
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