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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/26/2021 in all areas

  1. adm

    Roast Beef for Christmas

    Here in the UK, turkey is the traditional Christmas lunch, but I like Roast Beef instead! I got a rather nice 3Kg (6.6lb) rib roast from my butcher. I believe you lot over the pond would call it prime rib. This is expensive here, so it's a bit of a luxury, but then again it is Christmas. I salted it well with sea salt 48 hours before to give the salt time to draw moisture out of the meat and then reabsorb it back in. Then a little more salt and pepper prior to cooking it. It went on the Kamado at 110C (230F) and took about 4 hours to reach 49.5C (121F) at which point I pulled it and left it to rest under some foil for about 90 minutes. Perfect temperature control using the Fireboard 2. Once I pulled it, the internal temperature rose to a maximum of 56.7C (134F) to end up between rare and medium rare. Then I let the Kamado gain temperature until it hit around 425C (800F) and then gave the meat 8 minutes to sear it off. Served of course with the traditional British accompaniment of Yorkshire Puddings, roast potatoes, horseradish and the rest of the trimmings... Damn, it was good! And we still have enough left for roast beef sandwiches later today. Happy belated Christmas everyone!
    13 points
  2. philpom

    Sous vide ribeye roast

    This is probably my favorite way to cook one if these roasts. Did this one for the family Christmas. 126°f in the water bath for about 8 hours. It's already a tender cut so we just need to get it to temp. It was vacuum sealed with a Montreal steak rub. After the bath it was put on a hot fire for 15 minutes to sear. I tossed on some mesquite chips. The grill was set up like this to provide high but indirect heat for the finish. Everyone enjoyed it!
    7 points
  3. Starting off traditionally. A pot of black eyed peas and sausage simmering for three hours while the cabbage is smoking on the grill and the ham is baking. Here’s hoping 2022 is better than the last two years! Now I have to make the hard choice before heading for my recliner and the football games!
    7 points
  4. I had shoulder surgery a couple of weeks ago, so I’ve been on the sidelines for a bit. Figured I’d try some one-armed cooking since I’ll be in a sling for 2 months. This was a take on a Chef Eric Gephard recipe and was pretty easy to cook. (Must have been since I was able to do it with one arm!) Whole Foods had the Chilean sea bass on sale, which is what steered me in this direction. Served 2 for around $25 total with all ingredients and was very good! I’ll skip the buerre blanc next time as it had too much lemon flavor for my taste. I’d either just season with a good rub or add a sweeter glaze - something with maple syrup or honey. The sweet potatoes were made with a bourbon infused maple syrup - absolutely stunning! Apologies for the paper plate presentation. It’s just me and the Mrs. so we’re pretty low-key. :-) Got a pellet tube for Christmas so I’ll be tackling some cold smoked cheese soon.
    7 points
  5. The cool days of winter are perfect for cold smoking cheese. Every year at this time I smoke a big batch of cheddar. It will be well aged by the time I give them as gifts for next Christmas. I start a small pile of lump in a grill that is not used for the cheese. Once it's going well I place about 3 smaller pieces on HD foil and cover with a large handful of chips. Then wrap it up so it resembles a Hershey kiss with a small opening at the top. Lay that in the bottom of the grill for the cheese. Place the rack in, open the vents and place the cheese in. You should have a steady wisp of smoke but not massive billows. I usually leave the cheese in for 10 to 15 minutes. I found hickory to pair very well with sharp cheddar. I like to use herbs and spices on the cheese before I vaccum seal it for aging. This year I did 3 varieties and I can't wait to try them. Black pepper is a regular and this year I tried crushed red pepper and caraway seed as an experiment. This was 5 pounds of tillamook sharp cheddar. Finished caraway seed. Crushed red pepper. Black pepper. Don't miss the chance this winter and try it!
    6 points
  6. Golf Griller

    Costco Ribs

    I had to pick up a couple of things at Costco today. As usual I look at the meats to see what they have. This is what I found today:
    6 points
  7. 6 points
  8. philpom

    Fun with Dutch ovens

    We spent a few weeks in the mountains at our cabin in December last year. One of the funnest parts of going up there is the cooking and the food. For some odd reason after a day of splitting wood and stacking it, dragging railroad ties around for landscaping or taking down a block fire pit to move it and rebuild it.... Every meal is the best you ever had.  everything was cooked like so. It's a fun and relaxing way to do it and offers a great level of control. Breakfast pizza We tossed everything including the kitchen sink in this. Chorizo, bacon, breakfast sausage. Cheese. Olives, eggs etc.. I will admit to using wack o can of dough. Chuck roast It was cold, getting down near single digits and this was perfect for it. Standard stuff, carrots, onion, potatoes, herbs and beef broth. It's also nice cooking this way since we heat with wood the wood stove is a great place to keep food warm or even reheat it.
    5 points
  9. Hey guys....I pulled my prime rib out at 37 days and trimmed it last night. I SPG’d it and wrapped it in plastic wrap. Cooking it for New Year’s Eve tomorrow for friends and family. Only dilemma is whether I’m going to oven roast it or rotisserie on the gas grill with some hickory smoke pouches. It’s going to be minus 18 Celsius here on New Year’s Eve.
    5 points
  10. JeffieBoy

    Prime Rib 101

    Hey John, thanks for the Tutorial. Due to last minute pandemic direction changes here in Ontario we decided to toss a smallish (5.7 lb) Prime Rib in for the smaller group that was expected. A quick review of the tutorial and away I went. Seasoned and wrapped the day before, followed by 500(ish) on the Akorn for 20 minutes and then into a 225 oven until finished. Worked out well even though my plans were changed by the majority of “medium” beef eaters…
    5 points
  11. 5 points
  12. philpom

    Baked cod

    Super easy and fast weekday dinner. Lightly breaded. Good stuff! Olive oil, old bay and plain bread crumbs. 400°f for 14 minutes then under the broiler until crispy.
    4 points
  13. I went to the food kitty to buy a butt. They had these marked down. when I was a kid, we had a series of charcoal grills. Finally got one , a brazier with a motorized spit. That thing did not have a counter weight, so rrrr, sss, rrr, sss. Like a steady snore. Picnic was our go to for bbq. I don’t think rub even existed back then. We usually brushed on bbq sauce. Don’t remember a thermometer either. Old school, you just had to know when it was done. I don’t think we ever cooked one as long as we do today. This one went 13 hours, 45 minutes.
    4 points
  14. BarqPulledPork.mp4 Pulled pork perfection.....
    4 points
  15. I was at the butcher a couple of days ago and they had pork butt on sale. Having been inspired by your perfection, I grabbed a small 5 lb’er. Slathered it in Cholula Sweet Habanero Sauce as a binder and hit with a combo of R Butts R Smokin Cherry Habanero and Lane’s Q-Nami seasonings. Cooking at 250° with a chunk of cherry wood. (Sense a theme?) Been mopping every hour or so with an apple cider vinegar, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper mop sauce. It’s been going for 4 hours and currently sits at 150°. Hoping it will be ready for dinner without wrapping. It’s a glorious 65° day here in DFW and it’s hard to beat enjoying the weather with an easy cook! Thanks again for the inspiration @John Setzler!
    4 points
  16. Yeah, as pretty much always, I agree with Jack. He has been kamado cooking for quite a while. After years and years of cooking on a Weber kettle, I started kamado cooking on a Vision Pro C with more contemporary vents with knobs and dials. It was a wonderful grill, but I got into the kamado zen mystic and wanted a basic or classic basic " back to the roots " kamado with a slide bottom vent. I got a large BGE which is almost the exact size and dome tapper of a Vision Classic. If I had started with the Vision Classic, I would probably still be cooking on it. All my after market gear for the Vision fit perfectly in my new BGE and I still use it. Almost all the time I cook only for my wife and I. On holidays I cook for my extended family of 12, and usually cook a large cut like a PR or 13lb spatchcocked turkey, Occasionally we will invite one or two couples from the neighborhood over for dinner. The 18" grate on my BGE gives me enough room and suites how and who I cook for just fine. An 18" should meet your present family configuration pretty well also. However, if you look down the probable road, your toddler, could be joined by a brother or sister or maybe even both, and eventually they will have birthday parties, and most likely baseball / soccer team BBQ's and so on . I would Think you have two paths; on one, you start out with an 18 and see what your needs are in the future. On the other, you figure you will need a bigger grill in the future and get one now. Neither option is a bad one. On the choice between kamado brands. both the KJ and the Vision and any of the major kamado Mfgs for that matter, are high quality grills and capable of turning out amazing cooks. Get what you like and what you think you can afford.
    4 points
  17. Mari Campbell and Emily Smith perform Auld Lang Syne in the original Scottish/English/Gaelic version as written by 19th century poet Robert Burns. Originally written as a prose poem, it was not set to music until well into the 20th century. Campbell and Smith also preserve the original melody, which is noticeably different from what we have come to know here in the US. I hope you enjoy it. Thanks for your participation in and enthusiasm for Kamado Guru. Happy New Year to all.
    4 points
  18. BartH.

    New KJ classic 1 owner

    Wife bought classic Jo 1 as a birthday gift for me. Cooked steaks last night as first cook and totally amazed at the difference in taste coming from a Weber kettle grill. I’ve got my eye on a charcoal basket and DO Jo.
    4 points
  19. I organized a little bit...
    4 points
  20. Here's my most recent video... This 11.5 pound butt was an extra perfect cook... I cooked it overnight at 220f for about 12 hours, wrapped it, ramped up the temp to 300f to finish it.. rested it for 3 hours and the butt just wanted to fall apart on its own...
    4 points
  21. This little guy showed up on one of my hummer feeders. During summer we go through 3 quarts of sugar water a day (10 lbs of sugar a week), so we have hundreds of hummingbirds a year. I have never seen a white one like this.
    4 points
  22. First off, Drew P. I've been cooking on a Primo Oval XL for about 11 years now. The ceramic plate at the bottom is there only to prevent the bottom of the shell from coming in contact with red hot charcoal that may get through the bottom CI grate. When in place, the plate leaves about 3/4" between it and the firebox and exposes the same amount of the bottom shell. Most particles that fall through the CI grate are small and mostly ash, so they are not as hot as the center of the fire. On at least one occasion, after a shop vac cleaning, I forgot to replace the bottom ceramic plate and did a 250* 5 hour rib cook, after which I let the temp rise to about 550 for 20 minutes to burn the dome and grates clean. There was no cracking or visible damage to the bottom shell. I haven't noticed any latent damage over time. So, I'd say get a KiskAsh (or generic) charcoal basket, keep the CI grate in place, and go ahead and cook. I would go ahead and order a replacement ceramic bottom plate or buy some kiln pieces that you can make fit in the bottom as best as you can, or even put a 1/2" layer of sand in the bottom (that you can vacuum out later) and avoid really high temp cooks until the new ceramic bottom is in place.
    3 points
  23. I snapped this photo in November while on a walk. I figured it would make a great shot.
    3 points
  24. John Setzler

    The Fireboard SPARK

    I bought one of these new instant read thermometers made by Fireboard this week from Atlanta Grill Company. It's called the SPARK. It's $150. I am gonna make a demo/review video of this early next week and get it published as quickly as possible. This thermometer has a lot of cool features. In my initial toying with it, I did, of course, try to compare how fast it works as an instant read thermometer compared to my Thermapen ONE. I set up my unscientific thermometer testing lab with a sous vide bath set at 155°F along with a handheld stop watch. I timed the Thermapen ONE on about 5 different measurements from ambient to target temp. All of those readings were between 1.6 and 1.8 seconds. The same test with the Fireboard SPARK were all between 1.7 and 1.9 seconds. So yea.. it's fast. When I get the demo/review video made I'll come back to this post and add the video here ...
    3 points
  25. And just like that I am proud new owner of a Kamado Joe classic 18"
    3 points
  26. JLP. The amount of charcoal consumed, IMO, should be way down on the list of factors considered when making the choice you described. I usually cook for only 2 and my KJ Jr. gets used way more often than my big Primo XL. On the other hand, when cooking for a group or when cooking ribs, having the real estate to cook in large quantities or to lay several racks of ribs flat is not something I want to give up. There are plenty of differing opinions here on which size to buy. I suggest you make a list of your needs and cooking/food preferences (with charcoal consumption way down at the bottom of the list ) to help you decide. Whichever way you decide, you're going to love cooking on a kamado. Good luck.
    3 points
  27. wannasmoke

    Got a KJ

    After several years owning a Vision I finally got a KJ II. I'm pretty excited. The Vision worked great for me but I'm super pleased with the KJ.
    3 points
  28. This might be the best rack of baby backs I have ever cooked. I get these extra meaty racks at Walmart. You have to look for them but if you dig around you will find some of these 5lb racks that are crazy good....
    3 points
  29. Been eyeballing one of these for quite some time now. Got us some RVing equipment and couldn't fathom lugging the JR around the country knowing how fragile and heavy they are. It's a beast but so far I really like it and just trying to get it settled in. Just ordered a KAB for it because I really like how they work in my Kamado's.
    3 points
  30. lnarngr

    First Tri-tip

    Day-Um! This thang's great! So tender! I watched a video on cutting the tri-tip against the grain. The Warden is happy! Drop the mic! Of course mine did not look exactly like the traditional tri-tip but I figured it out. Willys1, again, major thanks for the inspiration! I might never have tried-tip (sorry) without your thread. Thanks!
    3 points
  31. Happy New Year from the high desert. It snowed here last night, so I took my wife on a little drive out through an area know as Williamson's Valley, early this morning. Got to see a group of probably more than 100 Pronghorn, along with some really beautiful scenery.
    3 points
  32. 5 lb bone-in rib roast. I used Steve Reichlan's BBQ rub from his barbecue sauces rubs and marinades book. But I cut the salt in half cuz I found it was too salty for my taste.Cooking at 275 degrees, approximately. So my Target Temp was 125. And that's the temp I pulled it off on. Loosely tented it with foil for 20 minutes as I prepared the twice cooked baked potatos. Came out real good. Very flavorful. And very tender.
    3 points
  33. I don't think I ever posted this. One of those "Urk" moments.
    3 points
  34. Yeah, been doing that for New Years Eve for probably the last 10 years. I buy a bone-in whole prime rib and cut off a four bone chunk for the whole fam's Christmas dinner and then cut the rest into steaks. Health wise too much meat in a short span, but after all It's Christmas and New Years. I match it with four little tails from one of those Cost Co six packs. No desire to join the madness on New Years any more, just a quiet dinner with my wife, a glass or two of old vine zinfandel, maybe watch a streaming show and off to bed. Happy New Year and may God Bless you and yours.
    3 points
  35. My son in law’s first whisky! I have been chasing him for almost five years for a sneak taste with no luck. This was a 500 bottle release with a 2 bottle limit and it sold out in 20 minutes. An ABV of 59.1%. We got our two bottles and will have to ration until his next release.
    3 points
  36. Thanks again everyone. @Boater, appreciate the pm you sent. I did decide to go with the ham, and though this is a gross exaggeration, I'm going to say that I burned it up. While it was on, we were called to the hospital and donned all of the paraphernalia to enter the room. I'll resist venting about the way things were handled on the hopsital's end throughout this entire ordeal, but we were able to talk to him, sing a few Christmas hymns, express our love for him and pray with him before leaving. He passed about 11pm Christmas evening. I am grateful, first of all, to have been there to spend the day with my mom so she did not have to exeperience any of it alone. Mostly, we are appreciative that 38 years ago to the date, he attended an early morning Christmas service and understood the Gospel for the first time. He trusted Christ as Lord and Savior. He was a changed man from that date and an extremely tense and fractured relationship between he and myself was healed. We find it so appropraite that the Lord would reward him by calling him home on Christmas as well peace...
    3 points
  37. I did one on the Joe- no rotisserie, it took a little under 2 hours at 325. I scored the skin to drain off more fat.
    3 points
  38. My son followed in my shoes and took up the saxophone. My dad is a musician, as was my grandmother (a Holocaust survivor). The crown jewel Christmas gift this year was my grandmother's old wind-up metronome, given to my son by my dad. It still works, but has a bit of a hitch to it, so it's not totally symmetrical with the beat it keeps. I may look into getting it tuned up somewhere, if I can find the right place. Very cool gift.
    3 points
  39. philpom

    Merry Christmas

    Merry Christmas and a blessed new year!
    3 points
  40. Malt vinegar as a post-cook sprinkle on french fries or oven roasted/grilled potatoes is delicious. Just ask anyone from the UK.
    2 points
  41. I remembered about Hatch chili peppers and I looked up this older post. Hatch Chili Co. made some move and their Hatch pepper products are on the shelves here in Nashville area stores. Good stuff. My shipping woes have settled (for now) and I need to order up some Fresh Chili Co. stuff and try it. Thanks for the info @philpom
    2 points
  42. Just want to thank you for this recipe. It was my first long smoke on the Akorn and everyone who got to have some before it was gone have said it came out incredible. My deviations and mis-steps from the original: I used a 2/3 full fire box of Jealous Devil XL Lump lit in three places. My first mistake was just adding fresh lump over the existing pieces, as I think those pieces may have partially blocked my lower vent. In the future I'll start by stacking large chunks over the bottom grate and filling in the rest with smaller pieces for max airflow. My smoking wood was 5 chunks of basic Cherry bought from Publix. I haven't played with different flavors yet, as cherry has been great for everything I've cooked so far. I made a mistake with putting too much smoke in some chicken the first time I did a low-n-slow, so this time I used what ended up being the perfect amount after doing some reading on here. I stabilized my Akorn at ~250 but got greedy and wanted to go lower and slower. I barely touched the vents and ended up almost snuffing the fire. Temp was in free-fall with the fire almost out, so to get it burning again I opened the lid and the bottom vent to re-stoke the charcoal. I didn't notice that my grill grate mounted temp probe fell out and rested against the meat while I was panicking, and for the next 30 minutes or so my temp had flattened at 150. Thinking I needed to bring it back up to temp I opened both vents to "3". Temp wasn't climbing so I decided to open the lid again, and that's when I found my mistake. Corrected the temp probe and my temp was almost 300! I tried to figure out a solution and came to the thought that my drip pan was empty. I filled the drip pan with ice water and was able to drop the temp back down to 240, and then to my surprise the temp walked itself down and stabilized again at ~225. My temp chart is a mess for about an hour in the middle but the rest of the cook it is straight as an arrow. Learned valuable lessons by almost ruining the cook... I wrapped completely in foil at 160 and removed from heat at 195. I would have brought the temp up a bit higher, but my graph completely flattened out by about 193 and my rate of rise ended up only being 1 degree per hour towards the end. For the cooler I was able to use a large styrofoam cooler that I had left over. I made sure to rest the meat with the top open on the counter until it was just barely too hot to hold in my hands so that the styrofoam didn't melt, wrapped tightly in foil, and put a beach towel on top of it. I assume the towel addition is to collect moisture? After unwrapping the pork it started falling apart in my hands as I was transferring it into a bowl for pulling. Perfect texture, very juicy, and a great bark on it. Total cook was 9.5 hours for a 6.5lb butt and it fed the wife and I with plenty for leftovers and a bit to give away. IMG_5048.MOV
    2 points
  43. lnarngr

    Kamado Pro Joe

    Correct, this site is affiliated with Kamado John!
    2 points
  44. I really like short ribs and have found that I like them best when I braze them in an aromatic brazing liquid, rather than cooking them directly on my grill grate. You bring the liquid about 1/2 to 3/4 of the way up the sides of the ribs, and turn them every hour. I use a red wine, beef broth, 10 cloves of garlic, kosher salt, cracked pepper, and a 1/2 cup apple cider, and Simon and Garfunkel herbs mixture. About 6 hours at 300 to 350* is the longest I have gone using this technique I usually go 4 to 5 hours. I don't measure the IT of the ribs, I just use a probe to check tenderness. I pretty much always toss in some thick cut carrots, celery, Spanish onion, and red potatoes during the last 2 hours. Comes out pretty amazing and is a one pot meal fit for a special occasion. I do it over indirect heat in my Egg uncovered.(cooking uncovered the liquid will reduce so you will need to add a little wine/broth mixture during the cook Let the liquid reduce at the end to thicken the braze liquid into a sauce). I often add a chunk of pecan or cherry wrapped tightly in foil with a few tiny holes (one of John's smoking techniques) produces a gentle smoke and lasts a long time. The over all flavor is a blend of rich, savory, and smokey. Pick out a nice bottle of Oaked Pinot or Zinfandel, goes perfect. I use this pan which is perfect for brazing in a kamado, I clean the inside only and let the outside develop a smokey patina. https://www.walmart.com/ip/tramontina-enameled-cast-iron-4-qt-covered-braiser/22848443
    2 points
  45. I let the cheese set on the counter for a bit because I don't want moisture on the surface so it warms a bit. The smoke is cold and the temp inside the smoker is close to ambient so it doesn't really soften. That's what you want and why winter is a great time to do this. The seasoning will adhere very well to the cheese but some will come off when you cut it. I expect that the red pepper flakes where they heavily overlap one another to fall off (no contact with the cheese). I press it on as I apply it. I let it age at least 3 months although I might sample a new variety after 2 months. 6 mounts or more is better in my opinion but some folks will tell you that a few weeks is good enough. It really comes down to personal preference but if you sample it too soon it may resemble an ashtray. This is why I carefully select my wood and smoke it as described above. Heavy smoke for very long will make it extremely strong, the cheese takes up the smoke very well.
    2 points
  46. willys1

    First Tri-tip

    Prolly shouldn't post this here as there was no grill involved and, even worse, no pics taken but just had to share. Anyway, about a week and half ago I was thinking about what to have for Christmas dinner when I got the bright idea to cook this 4.5 lb tri-tip I had picked up from Sam's awhile ago: Unfortunately, I had just finished thawing it out and wasn't sure if it would keep for another 10 days. After a little research and the fact it was cryovac wrapped, I decided to break a couple of my rules: 1. Re-freezing meat after it was thawed. 2. Serving a dish to guests that I had never even tasted before, let alone cooked myself. I knew the meat would be perfectly safe to eat but wasn't sure if it would affect taste or texture. Despite concerns I threw it back in the freezer and pulled it a few days later to thaw back out in fridge. Christmas morning I unpackaged and set out on the counter to dry a little and get up to room temp. My plan was to reverse sear this thing in the oven at 235F and then finish on the grill. Didn't get the grill fired up in time so once meat hit an internal temp of 120F I threw onto a smoking hot CI pan with a couple tablespoons of butter. After a good sear the meat hit 131 and left to rest. 20 minutes later I sliced thick slices against the grain to see it vary from medium on the ends and a deep red medium rare in the middle. And, man, was it awesome - great flavor, juicy, and melt in your mouth tender that my family and guests raved about! And this wasn't even a prime cut, just choice. Why have I never tried this before?! I've certainly read about tri-tip but I just isn't see around these parts much and I really didn't know much about it. But this was easily in my top 5 steak or roast meals ever and was unanimously voted the Christmas meal of choice from here out even with the less than perfect prep and technique. And at less than $8/lb even with today's prices, I'll definitely be on the lookout the next time I go shopping. The rub was a little heavy for our taste so looking forwarded to trying my own rub and actually using the grill next time (and taking some pics). If you've never had before I highly recommend giving it a try.
    2 points
  47. Blue is nice. I gave a friend who always has it at his house and he likes to share. My usual is Glenmorange or Glenlivet. My usual is either Glenlivet or Glenmorange. Good stuff there!
    2 points
  48. I think I have mine nailed down. Here's the abbreviated version: don't trim too much fat use your favorite rub smoke at 225-250 until the meat is 165 internal wrap in parchment paper and return to the grill until the meat is 200-205 internal rest it The spritzing isn't necessary, especially if you're wrapping it. For me, the key to the best brisket was wrapping. It holds in all the fat, keeping things from drying out. 165 is the point where the fat starts to render out. I have never had issues with the bark coming off, so I can't speak to that.
    2 points
  49. I got an email response from the metronome shop. They can't confirm whether or not it's a Seth Thomas from the pictures, only that it is very old. Old enough that they might not have the parts to repair it (Seth Thomas has been out of business for 50 years), and might only be able to replace the guts with new parts, which would mean drilling holes and stuff. I'm not really interested in doing anything invasive to it. It still works and is a great conversation piece, it just doesn't keep time well enough to use as a musician's tool.
    2 points
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