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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/12/2017 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    I can call it done now that I got the Primo in there. I had to build a bigger shop so I turned this one into an outdoor/indoor kitchen for winter.
  2. 5 points
    Addertooth

    Joe Jr use case

    Why?
  3. 4 points
    TKOBBQ

    Spaghetti and meatballs

    So after working a little on the grilling area most of the day my sous chef helped me whip this up.
  4. 4 points
    BhamBruni

    I tell ya...I get no respect

    After slaving over a hot grill for 100's of fabulous meals you would think my wife would take my request for a Harley a bit more seriously...
  5. 3 points
    Timtogrill

    Can't believe this Primo!

    Coming from an Akorn, I can't believe how easy this XL is to control. It's like getting out of a Pinto (for anyone that remembers those) and climbing in a Rolls-Royce.
  6. 3 points
    Rob_grill_apprentice

    Rotisserie chicken

    Today I brushed some chickens with melted duck fat, the coated places 1 tsp of Joes poultry seasoning and rubbed on breast under skin, then coated skin with mixture of baking power with joe poultry seasoning and then put 1 tsp of poultry seasoning inside the cavity. I used some sugar maple wood for the smoke. Very happy with result. 2nd Last photo was just before removing spit from Joetisserie. Final picture all 3 chickens carved. Now off to my wife's sisters place,
  7. 2 points
    pesto3

    Slow Cooked Lamb Shoulder

    I finally got to do a Lamb Shoulder today and I think this is something I will be doing on a regular basis. it turned out perfect!! I used a basic rub of freshly chopped mint, parsley, salt and pepper and chucked it with garlic and rosemary. after 2 hours I put some warm water in my pan with a heap of fresh herbs and wrapped it in foil and cooked it for another 3.5 hours. Thanks for your input Alimac23!
  8. 2 points
    coldfusion

    New Vision Classic B owner

    My Akron has given me many a good cooks. I started out with it thinking I wanted to re-start a hobby I had years ago. Turns out I really enjoyed it, had many successful cooks and I learned a lot from this forum, thank you all! I really wanted a ceramic grill when I bought the Akron, but just couldn't justify the money starting out. A ceramic was always in my thoughts tho, I just wanted to make sure I was really into this again. I did my homework on what my next grill would be. I thought long and hard about a Joe.....if I were younger yes that would be the one. Craftsmanship, price and warranty can't be beat! It would well outlive me, but I went with the Vision Classic B and not the pro. I would never use the electric start and would have the air leaks that would be needed to be sealed up. I think the ash clean up would be easier, but I'll deal with this one as needed. My sister and strong nephew helped me get this home from wal mart. I got the grill and Vision lava stone for $686 including tax. The grill comes with a cover. My nephew had to leave, so I put the stand together. I had to put a washer on one of the wheel studs to get all 4 wheels to touch ground without rocking. Have a friend coming over tomorrow to help set grill in the stand. Looking forward to many a good cooks to come! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  9. 2 points
    In2Fish

    Overnight Pulled Pork

    I have a bunch of guys coming over tomorrow to check out my fishroom, and I just started 16 pounds of pork shoulder to serve tomorrow. I can't wait.
  10. 2 points
    papachaz

    Surf and turf supper tonight

    we had a surf and turf supper tonight. Ribeyes, Lobster tails and potatoes covered with olive oil and sea salt. All done on the Akorn. First time to ever cook lobster, and it won't be the last!
  11. 2 points
    Garvinque

    Chinese Garlic Chicken

    INGREDIENTS: 1 pound of cubed chicken breast or thighs 1 cup or handful of diced bell peppers 1 cup or handful of mini corns 1 cup or handful of diced onions 3 garden onions - chopped with whites and greens separated 2-3 cloves garlic - sliced or chopped stir fry sauce- I make my own but you can use store brand Tsang stir fry oil - garlic infused- I now use this for just about any recipe that calls for high heat oil Chicken marinade: 1 tbsp. soy sauce 2 tsp. rice vinegar 1 tbsp. corn starch Mix together with chicken and let rest for 20 minutes In a hot wok/skillet add stir fry oil and chicken. Cook and stir until chicken is done and remove. Add Tsang's stir fry oil in a medium high wok/skillet. Add onions. Stir and cook for one minute. Add garlic. Stir and cook for one minute. Add baby corn and bell peppers. Stir and cook for 2 minutes. Add chicken and juices back in wok. Stir and cook for 1 minute. Add some green onions and stir fry sauce. See up top for sauce considerations Stir and cook for 1 minute Enjoy Garvin
  12. 2 points
    Kamado Tas

    Slow Cooked Lamb Shoulder

    Thanks guys for the replies and for the original post. Cooked at around 275 and pulled this out a bit early at 190F. Was still awesome - tasted fantastic but reckon it would be better left on for a bit longer. Kids asked me to cook this again - must be a winner! Cheers
  13. 2 points
    ckreef

    The wife is away

    Looks good but ....... 3/4" thick is only about 3 minutes a side with a hot, fast, direct sear. No point in reverse sear until you are at least 1 1/2" thick.
  14. 1 point
    This topic comes up over and over all over the place. I am thinking it might be good to post a sticky or have a new section that new AKORN users or even new Kamado users in general can be directed for common issues and solution. I will attempt to detail exactly how to start a fire for slow low cooks. 1. Use only 100% lump 2. Pile the lump in the middle of the coal grill to form a "volcano". Your pile should extend from edge to edge and come within a few inches of the bottom of your diffuser. As much as 2 or 3 inches deep around the edge but remember "volcano" You want a little hole about 2.5"X2.5" wide and deep in the center. (as close to the grate as possible since you need this air flow) 3. At this point you can add 1-4 chunks of wood to you pile if desired. Spread them around in different locations and don't cover you hole. 4. Open top and bottom vents all the way. ***NOTE for step 5 - Veggie oil works well but now I use alcohol on the cotton. I cram a plastic jar with cotton balls and dump alcohol in it. Then I always have a stash near the grill and ready to go. The alcohol isn't as finicky as the oil. I also use SUPER JUMBO cotton balls so 1 is enough. - edit 6/23/2012 5. Do not use a chinmey of any sort to light it. Even a Weber light cube it too much. (maybe 1/4 of one would work I have not tried it). I use 2 large coton balls. I stretch it a little and drizzle a little vegetable oild on it (too much and this won't work so this part might take a little practice but cotton balls are cheap). Light it and drop it down in your little hole. Wait a moment to ensure it lights well and then repeat with the next one. When you drop the 2nd one in the hole be careful not to smother the first. 6. Carefully place 1 or 2 pieces of small lump over/in the hole in such a way that it does not starve or smother the cotton but it exposed to the flame. 7. Once you are certain the cotton is going well you may place your diffuser and cooking grate back on the grill. and close the lid. 8. Watch the temp carefully. It may take 5 to 15 minutes or more to see it move up in to the 100+ range. No worries, have a cold one while you wait. 9. Once you hit 160 you want to start closing it down. Start with 2 on top and 2 on the bottom. The idea at this stage is to slowly ease up to around 200. 10. Once you hit 200 cut it back a little further. 1 on top and 1 on the bottom. Watch your temp very careful. 1 of 2 things will happen at this point. It will continue to rise slowly (this is good, cut back to .75 on top and .5 on teh bottom) or it will stall or even drop in temp a litle. (if this happens open it an additional .5 on top and .5 on the bottom) 11. Coming out of step 10 you should be able to get your cook to stabilize at your targer temp near the 2 and some change mark. Once you have eased in to your target put the top at .5 and the bottom at .5. Observe and you should be at a pretty stable point. 10 and 11 take the most practice and I can't stress enough how important it is to work the vents in .25 to .5 point increments, allow at least 10 minutes after an adjustment to observe the difference before making further adjustments. In general terms each set of adjustments represent 1/2 the movement of the previous (roughly) and you will narrow in on your target over time. The more you do this the better you get and the faster it can be done. I have burned for over 20 hours and hardly put a dent in my fuel supply, refilling should not be required. Now - why cotton balls and not a chimney or even weber cubes? The chimney will certainly light too much lump at once and believe it or not so will the weber cube. After using the cotton ball you can observe that the very edge of 3 or 4 pieces of lump are actually lit. This is all that is needed bring the tmep up in a kamado cooker. Other methods like using paper, fluid etc light way too much lump and will cause issue with your burn. Lighting in this fashion I would expect a look of shock on your face when after 8 hours of burn you look to see that there is only a little charing to all the lump you put in the cooker. Give this a try, use plenty of patience the first 3 or 4 times and let me know how it works for you. Works miracles for me and I feel pretty good that it will work for you. I am also interested in any modification to this basic procedure you coem up with that helped you out. No doubt others would also benefit. For example, there are other ways to light insteaf of a cotton ball I'm sure. It just seends to be very small. Good luck and happy grilling!
  15. 1 point
    I wrote up my thoughts and ideas about the Smoker Pot experiments here: http://www.flavoredbyfire.com/2017/02/09/the-smoker-pot/ I want to add some things to that as well. Hole positioning and sealing this smoker pot: Why not just put one or two holes in the top of this pot and place the pot on the bottom of the firebox instead of on top of the charcoal? That will eliminate the need to seal the pot or worry about the location of the small holes. I'm not convinced that the position of the holes on this device makes any difference in the smoke production. There will not be enough pressure built up inside this pot to make the smoke push down more than a couple mm as it exits the bottom of the pot. It's not going to push it down into a fire below the pot with any significance. If most of the fire is above the pot, the smoke will be traveling through that fire and any additional 'combustion' that might possibly take place would happen that way rather than by a questionable force of pressure pushing the smoke down into a fire from above. The only time I might want to put this on top rather than on the bottom would be for a hotter cook... maybe 350° or higher. That way I could just put the smoker pot on the fire right before I was ready to cook since those cooks are not going to go as long as a traditional low-and-slow cook. I did several tests with this device this week and I'm trying to be as objective as possible about it. It does produce clean smoke. There is no doubt about that. I am unable to measure visually, in taste, texture, or any other objective way, a difference in the resulting meat. I have heard the stories from those of you who believe this is the new big thing in smoking meats. I say to you "keep using it!" I intend to keep using it to some extent myself. Success in smoking food is dependent on several things: 1. A clean burning fire. Do not put your meat on the grill until the fire is stable. 2. Do not OVER SMOKE your food. Less is More. I believe that the issues with 'bad smoke' are more of a problem with too much smoke instead of the quality of that smoke.
  16. 1 point
    dfy8811

    Dem Bones!

    First cook in awhile, my Super Bowl cook...cherry and apple wood. Love the color! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  17. 1 point
    Aussie Joe

    Lamb shanks

    Strange weather down here been cold and wet needed some comfort food mixed up some sumac and cumin with flour gave the shanks a light coat of oildusted them in the flour mix and gave them a quick braise in my dutchie added some spring and normal onion gave them a quick stir then added some chicken stock and red wine with some rosemary and thyme did not have any fresh stuff so just used the jarsthen some plum jam mixed it all upand put in the shanksbrang it to the boil and let simmer for 10and on it goes at 315f after an hour I gave them a stir and basteafter two hours they are readyI took the shanks out and mixed up some of the juice with corn flour to thicken it up and put the shanks back inand served with some chick pea and spring onion mashed potato drizzled with the juice this is one of my favorite was of doing shanks because the plum sauce brings out an awesome taste Outback Kamado Bar and Grill
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
    wilpark

    Knife Sharpening.

    How many different stones do you use? Can you just use a single grit or multiple? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  20. 1 point
    True, but like you I would have eaten a slice or two of that myself! Garvin
  21. 1 point
    ckreef

    interesting pizza video - good technique

    Semolina might have made Chuckie Cheese a better pizza. When I was around 16 (back in the stone age) I worked in the kitchen of a Chuckie Cheese. Back then they actually bought fresh vegetables that I spent 2-3 hours every morning chopping up for the lunch pizza rush. They did sprinkle on corn meal but nothing like that amount of semolina in the video. Back in the day Chuckie Cheese sold beer, their game room was video games and they had an adult section where you could smoke. Life has sure gone down the hill since then.
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    That is some good looking PP.
  24. 1 point
    TKOBBQ

    Ground & Formed Bacon - Loaves and Cased

    That looks delicious.
  25. 1 point
    Marbque

    Rocking Santoku plus extras

    very beautiful knife
  26. 1 point
    Stile 88

    Smoker Pot and Good vs Bad Smoke

    but if everyone else advises to put them on bottom but you put them on the side how do you know if it dosent make a difference if you havent tried it each to their own but i wouldn't refute something unless i tried it myself first
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    Likes Big Butts

    Easiest part of my day.

    This is what I'm up to today, totally planned on waking up at like 4 to get it started but then totally didn't. Gonna be a long day.
  29. 1 point
    brichter45

    The wife is away

    Haha yup learned that the hard way [emoji849] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  30. 1 point
    brichter45

    The wife is away

    So, first the bad. I totally overshot my target temp of 120 prior to searing and it ended up around 140 [emoji47]. I was debating about even searing it but decided what the hell. Now the good. Even though it was closer to well done it still came out delicious. Like damn. Next time I will see if they have a thicker cut. This one was more towards 3/4 of an inch. The sear from the grill grate was fantastic! The only downfall is if I wanted to do more than one steak I would have to sear them one at a time. Maybe it's time to get the half moon KJ CI griddle for my classic! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  31. 1 point
    newb24

    Duluth Forge Kamado Grill

    before and after
  32. 1 point
    DerHusker

    The random pictures thread...

    Just got home from a vacation near here.
  33. 1 point
    Ben S

    Rehandleing a kitchen knife.

    Ok. I popped off the rivets and am trying to figure out how much steel to remove. This is new. I will tape the blade to protect me from it and it from me. Then using cheap bits on my drill press I went right through the rivets. Next I am trying to mark up how much of the full tang to cut out and how I will do it. This knife is stainless steel.
  34. 1 point
    rythememan4

    Overnight Pulled Pork

    I don't know I would call that an aquarium room Sent from my SM-G360T1 using Tapatalk
  35. 1 point
    Rob_grill_apprentice

    New Vision Classic B owner

    You will enjoy for Vision Classic B. I have had mine for 5 years now.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    8 hours in. Pit temp is equal to the flame boss 200.
  38. 1 point
    In2Fish

    Overnight Pulled Pork

    Nope, that's a good guess, nothing to do with ice fishing and in DC that's more like hypothermia swimming w/ our temps
  39. 1 point
    In2Fish

    Overnight Pulled Pork

    Here's the 7:30ish am update. The pork is looking nice at 170F. I had not dialed-in the temp as I though, so the temp ran high over night at 300F, and pork is very forgiving so im not worried. both shoulders are wrapped now and cruising nicely.
  40. 1 point
    cschaaf

    Rocking Santoku plus extras

    He's gotta pay for his wall of knives somehow. I'm picturing this:
  41. 1 point
    Have done a couple cooks so far. Did the Spatchcock Chicken. Just did a simple rub, cooked over direct heat and turned out awesome! But the real winner so far has been a Peach Rosemary Pork Tenderloin that I watched a video John Setzler had on the Brine, Rub and Glaze. Holy cow was one of the best things ever! Highly recommend you all trying it. Only thing I would have done different is get a bit more "char" in that phase of the cook. I was afraid of it being burnt or tasting burnt....but it was not at all, the char was delicious!
  42. 1 point
    Aussie Joe

    The random pictures thread...

    Outback Kamado Bar and Grill
  43. 1 point
    John Setzler

    Big Balls

    ...with some smoke....
  44. 1 point
    GLOCKer

    Duluth Forge Kamado Grill

    Can you take some pictures of the inside of your rig there? Both empty and then with the amount of lump you would put in it??? I'm wondering if you're loading up with enough lump. I load my Vision up and on my last smoke, saw around 250 degrees for around 11 1/2 hours in 20 to 25 degree weather. I also barely need my top vent open to maintain those temps over a long period. I'm talking my top vent is only cracked 1/16" to 1/8". When I'm not using my CyberQ, my bottom vent is basically just barely cracked open too. I seem to maintain good airflow (the smoke looks to be coming out of the top vent at a good clip) and I can generally maintain temps very well over time. With the CyberQ, it's ridiculously cool to me how well I can hang around 250 degrees!
  45. 1 point
    Boomer

    The random pictures thread...

    When you are a young kid out of high school and you get to refuel these on a nice summer day! My first time refueling the USAF Thunderbirds. I sure miss doing this!
  46. 1 point
    Boomer

    The random pictures thread...

    "Hey Bob, fire up the after burners and see if she'll launch from here!"
  47. 1 point
    Aussie Joe

    The random pictures thread...

    Outback Kamado Bar and Grill
  48. 1 point
    Aussie Joe

    The random pictures thread...

    Outback Kamado Bar and Grill
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
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