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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/06/2017 in all areas

  1. just4fn

    Steak on the Barbee

    Here's the money shot. Cooked 5 minutes each side at about 500 degrees. Pulled meat over the the indirect side and baked at 525 for about 20 minutes. Pulled it at 128 degreess. Perfect to our liking! I used mesquite charcoal and it tasted fantastic!
    3 points
  2. Update... The new charcoal grate and gasket were delivered today. I also decided to splurge for a new top vent with the daisy wheel as I am just more comfortable with them. After getting it ready, I did a couple bone-in NY Strips and roasted potatoes. Turned out great. I still have to look at the hinge as it seems to be binding about a half inch from closed. I am pretty happy with the new grill.
    2 points
  3. I have the Classic and Junior. With these combined I have no need for the Big Joe. I can fire both up at the same time and cook extra when needed but most often find myself firing the Junior. The good thing about 2 grills is that you can cook at 2 different temps at the same time and have the whole meal ready at the same time.
    2 points
  4. Most failed pizza cooks are for the same reason when it comes to kamados and blackstone ovens. There is a relationship between cooking temperatures and your dough recipes that must be understood. Rule #1 - stay away from store-bought pizza dough. Those doughs are designed for cooking in your kitchen oven at lower temperatures. They have sugars and oils that will scorch easily at the temperatures you are going to see on your Kamado and the Blackstone oven. Rule #2 - Great pizza takes some patience to make. Make your dough from scratch and the only ingredients that should go in it until you have your process down pat are flour, water, salt, and yeast. Rule #3 - Higher cooking temperature (700+) = lower hydration dough - Lower cooking temperatures (500-600) = higher hydration doughs (see recipes below) You need to understand baker's percentages for this process. Most pizza doughs are between 60 and 70 percent hydration. This means that for every kilogram of flour in the recipe, there will be 600 to 700 grams of water, depending on your recipe. If you are cooking on a blackstone oven at 800 degrees or higher, you should have a dough that is about 60% hydration. These pizzas are going to cook very quickly. They should not have an overabundance of toppings in order to have the toppings AND the crust properly cooked. If you are cooking on a Kamado at 500-600 degrees, you should have a dough that is about 70% hydration. The higher hydration allows you to cook longer without scorching the crust. You can also cook on the Blackstone at these temperatures using 70% hydration doughs as well. Now I will probably get chastised for saying this but it needs to be said.... The Kamado ain't the greatest tool in the shed for baking pizzas. The kamado can work very well for pizza, but there are some issues that make it difficult to tame sometimes. The problem in the kamado environment is that the pizza stone can get too hot for the temperature in the dome. If stone is 700+ degrees and the temp in the dome is 500 or less, it can create some issues with burning crusts before the toppings are done. The kamado loses a LOT of dome heat when you open the lid to put the pizza on. By nature, the ceramic kamado grills recover that lost heat quickly but in the case of a super hot pizza cook they may not recover it quickly enough. We are looking at pizza cook times here that are just a few minutes long. Third party products like the Pizza Porta can help with this. There are other add-ons that allow you to have a pizza stone under and over the pizza that help as well. At any rate, if you plan to master pizza on the kamado, my recommendation is to do it at lower temps where the stone and the dome temps are in the 550 degree range and use 70% hydration ( or possibly higher in some cases) dough recipes. Setting up the kamado for proper pizza cooking is important also. You need your heat deflector at the top level... it can be sitting on your cooking grate. The pizza stone should be on top of the heat deflector with a gap between them that can be created with anything fire proof that will give you at least a half inch gap between the heat deflector and the pizza stone. This process will help you keep the pizza stone from overheating. The fire in your firebox is raging hot if your dome temperature is 500+ degrees. This gap helps keep the temp of the pizza stone under control. Learning to get the pizza on the stone quickly and without fully opening the dome lid is also a beneficial trick to learn. SUPER TIP: When learning to make great pizza at home, start out cooking them in your home oven rather than a kamado or other pizza oven. This will give you the opportunity to learn the pizza making process with one less variable in the loop. Your home oven may not be your favorite choice of tools for cooking a pizza, but I can tell you that it will cook at a consistent and easily reproduced temperature setting. When you master a particular pizza recipe in your home oven give it a try in the kamado! As I have recommended to many before... go buy this book: The Elements of Pizza This book teaches you a LOT about the art of making great pizza. I also recently picked up this book: The Pizza Bible The philosophies in these two books are a little different but the are both beneficial books if you wanna make great pizza at home. Some dough recipes to get you started: 60% and 70% Hydration Simple Pizza Dough (with multiple techniques for flavor enhancement) : This is enough dough for three 11-12" pizzas... 500 grams Flour (all purpose flour or 00 italian style flour) = 100% 350 grams water @ 90-95 degrees = 70% (300 grams if making 60% dough) 13 grams fine sea salt = 2.6% Instant dried yeast (see below for quantities based on your technique) QUICK DOUGH: In a large mixing bowl, dissolve 2 teaspoons of yeast in the warm water. Add the flour and salt and mix by hand until the flour is completely incorporated and no dry flour remains. Cover the bowl and let rest for 20 minutes. Remove the dough to a floured surface and divide into three equal parts. Shape each part into a dough ball with a tight skin across the top. Place the dough balls on plates and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours or until at least doubled in size. After the dough has risen, shape the dough balls into a pizza crust and top with whatever you like, remembering that less is more on a pizza like this Cook this on a preheated pizza stone in your grill or oven at 500-550 degrees until done. ONE TO TWO DAY DOUGH: Change the yeast quantity to 1.5 grams (3/4 of 1/2 teaspoon) This process works the EXACT same was as above with a minor change. When you form your dough balls and put them on plates with plastic wrap covering them, place them in the refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours. After you remove them from the fridge, let them sit out at room temperature for four hours before shaping into pizza crusts. This slower cold ferment process will improve the flavor of your pizza crust. If you don't use all of your dough balls, you can vacuum seal them and put them in the freezer after the ferment process. When you are ready to use them remove from the freezer and let them come to room temperature on the counter for 5-6 hours before forming your pizza crust.
    1 point
  5. Kamado Guru Frequently Asked Questions Greetings Gurus... I’d like to start this document to answer some of the most frequently asked questions that appear on this group... with my own bias of course! These questions, when posted to a group like this, do NOT come with a single and agreed-upon answer. Most of the questions that appear here have answers that are based on the opinions and demographics of whoever is providing the answer, so here are mine: Question: Which size kamado grill should I buy as my first grill? Answer: You should buy the mid-size or the 18” diameter grill model as your first grill. Why? Because you can do about everything you would ever want to do on this size. Sure... there are some instances where a bigger grill is better but there is also a work around for about any situation you might come across. People are going to tell you to that it’s better to have too much space than not enough. If you believe that then go ahead and buy the larger grill. I cook a LOT of food on the grill. I cook on my grills frequently. I cook on my grills a lot more than the average person does. I cook a much wider variety of food on my grills than most people do. My 18” Kamado Joe Classic is my go-to grill. If I could only have ONE grill, THAT is the one I would want. For most of my cooks, the bigger grill takes longer to stabilize and is just an overkill for the task. Question: I am going to buy a kamado grill. Which brand should I buy? Answer: If you ask this question in a forum like this, what you will get is an answer from everyone who says to buy whatever brand it is that they own. The first question you need to ask is the one above. Decide which grill size you want to buy and then buy the most expensive one your budget will allow. Typically, you get what you pay for. If it comes down to $100-$150 variation in price between two competitors, look at the features that are included with the grill and see which one suits your needs the best. Once you have an idea of what you have to choose from, go to the company website and use their dealer locators to find a place close to you where you can go physically see the grill. You want to be able to put your hands on it and see the build quality and see the differences between one grill and the next. You may have to go to more than one location to see the various brands you have to chose from. If your dealer carries more than one brand that you are considering, don’t hesitate to ask them for their advice so you can compare it with any advice you have already received. Support your local dealer! Question: What are the ‘must-have’ accessories for kamado grilling? Answer: 1. You need the ability to cook over direct AND indirect heat. If your kamado grill does not include a heat deflector kit for indirect cooking, that is a must-have item. 2. You need a decent quality instant-read digital thermometer. Meat is cooked to specific internal temperatures. It is NOT properly cooked for a specific time at a specific temperature. There are a LOT of other wonderful accessories for kamado grilling, but these two are the only must-have items. Let your cooking experinece determine what accessories you want. Don’t buy anything before you realize if or why you need it. Question: What’s the best charcoal for kamado grilling? Answer: Hardwood lump charcoal. There are a lot of brands to choose from. I have personally used about 10 different brands and cooked successfully on all of it. I think some brands are better than others and I have my own favorite brand. My suggestion to YOU is to buy what is convenient for you to start with and learn how to use it and control your grill with it. Once you have mastered the operation of the grill, experiment with different charcoal brands. In order to really evaluate a brand of charcoal effectively, you will need to cook with 3 to 5 consecutive bags of it to get a good feel for how it behaves in your grill environment. You can’t get a ‘feel’ for how good or bad a charcoal brand is by using a single or even a partial bag of it. There are always consistency variations from one bag to the next, even within the same brand. A good cook has his/her preferences in charcoal but a good cook will produce good food on any charcoal. Question: I have my new kamado grill! What’s the first thing I should cook on it? Answer: Nothing! If you are new to kamado grilling, there are a couple steps you should take BEFORE putting any food on your grill. There is a small learning curve associated with controlling the temperatures inside a kamado grill. And controlling the temperature inside the grill is a fundamental learning procedure you need to MASTER as quickly as possible. Once this process is mastered, you can cook anything you like at any time. Your first task as a kamado owner should be to fill the firebox with charcoal, light that charcoal, insert the heat deflector and grill grates and stabilize your grill at 250°F without the help of any electronic gadgetry. In order to do this you should use one or two fire starters and bury them in the charcoal bed as deep as possible. Light them and let them burn with the lid fully open on the kamado grill for 10 minutes. Once that 10 minutes has passed, install the heat deflectors and grill grates and close the dome lid. Open your bottom vent to about 25% and open the top vent about 50%. DO NOT open the dome lid during this process. When your dome temperature reaches about 175°F, close the top vent to about 25% and let the temperature continue to rise. When it reaches 200°F, close the top vent a little more. Do this again at 225°F. If the temperature STOPS climbing before you hit 250°F, open the top vent back up a little more. Once your grill gets stable at 250°F, let it sit untouched and see if the temperature changes. If it goes for 20-30 minutes without going up or down, you have been successful. It’s not uncommon for the temperature to swing a little at this stage. Your ceramics are still absorbing heat. If you need to increase the heat inside your grill you will open the vents a little more to increase the airflow through the grill. If you need to cool things down, you will close the vents to decrease the airflow through the grill. Once the grill has gotten to temperature, it takes a while for vent changes to be noticed on the thermometer. It can take 20-30 minutes to see a temperature change sometimes. It’s more important to NOT overshoot your target temperature. If you do, don’t fret. If you catch it quickly it’s easy to bring the temp back down. If you do not catch it quickly it can take quite a while to cool the ceramics back down to your target temp. This process takes practice and you should practice it a few times to master the technique. Ceramic kamado grill stabilize and hold their temperature VERY WELL without any help in optimal conditions. The one condition that creates problems with stabilizing the temperature is wind. If you have windy conditions, you need to try to block wind from entering the lower vent of your kamado as much as possible. Question: Now that I know how important it is to understand how to control the temperature on my grill, what should I cook first? Answer: A Boston Butt I always recommend a boston butt as a first cook for a lot of reasons. This process teaches you several other important aspects of kamado cooking. A boston butt is a very forgiving piece of meat and it’s really hard to mess it up if you pay attention to a few simple things. Patience is one of those things. The meat will be ready when it’s ready and not before. This process also teaches you good lessons in how to control the temperature and stabilize your grill. You will quickly see exactly how stable a ceramic kamado can be. Question: Where should I measure the temperature inside my grill? Answer: It doesn’t really matter on a kamado grill. Your kamado grill comes with a dome thermometer. It’s perfectly capable of providing you with temperature readings that will get you through any cook you wish to do. Question: I didn’t believe the previous question and answer so I bought a digital thermometer system. When I put the pit probe inside my grill, it does not read the same as my dome thermometer. What is wrong? Answer: Two thermometers inside a kamado grill will never or very rarely read the same temperature. Which one is right? Chances are both of them are right. Since you have made the decision to try to chase precision and perfection in your temperature readings, you will be constantly perplexed by this question. A temperature probe that is too close to the meat on the grill will not read an accurate pit temperature. A temperature probe that is placed too close to the outer edge of a grill when the heat deflectors are in use will not read an accurate temperature. A temperature probe that is placed too close to the heat deflector will not read an accurate pit temperature. A temperature probe that is placed in a grill where a heat deflector is not in use will will not read an accurate temperature. If you can’t get an accurate pit temperature with a digital pit probe unless a bunch of these conditions are met, why own one? See the previous question and answer. The best results I have gotten with digital pit probes is to place them about 2 to 2.5 inches above the meat right in the center of the grill space. This usually requires clipping the probe onto a skewer or some other object that is stuck into the meat. The question always comes up about grate temp vs dome temp. There is a variation in some cases but it’s insignificant. When cooking with a heat deflector the grate vs dome temperature variation is not enough to worry about. It will not change the dynamics of your cook. More to come...
    1 point
  6. Aussie Joe

    Road kill

    Done a spatcy last night mixed up some butter with old bay placed it under the skin and gave it my favorite south African chicken rub cooked it on top of a bed of spuds carrots and red onion that I sprinkled with some evvo qunami and raging river
    1 point
  7. MAK Grills sent me one of their really nice pellet grills. I didn't know what to expect. In fact, I sort of expected a Stainless steel lil tex and typical pellet grill food (always good but nothing mind-blowing). My expectations were definitely exceeded. Now I'm really excited about this thing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6JZwO0HKhk
    1 point
  8. Just a quick little cook tonight. Perfect snack/dinner for the footy
    1 point
  9. I bet you gonna be pretty happy with those chunks of dead cow and taters too. They look delish. Enjoy both the the grill and those awesome looking steaks my friend.
    1 point
  10. It looks like the running goal isn't going to happen this year. My doc suggested that I drop some weight before I run as I was getting some foot pain. I enjoy cycling and today I did my 200th ride (39 mi.) since getting back on the bike. I have since pedaled 2523 miles (4036 km) in 221 hours. Feeling pretty good considering I thought my chest was going to explode in under 2 miles on my first ride.
    1 point
  11. Slowdown

    Cast iron half moon

    I'm a bit torn on getting the CI or using my CI pans. They have worked well so far so I think I will wait until I run into a situation that the CI pans can't handle. Plus is I can use them in the house too.
    1 point
  12. shuley

    Kamado Konfused

    Since you want to marry a grill I'd look into the Komodo kamado. I loved cooking on my Akorn but when I was ready to marry a grill I got a Komodo kamado. Definitely my most prized possession after my wedding ring.
    1 point
  13. Thanks for referral! Link's here: https://www.youtube.com/c/BEERNBBQBYLARRY https://www.beernbbqbylarry.com
    1 point
  14. Slowdown

    Flames from the Uuni

    Unfortunately, the Akorn was voted off the island. Everyone needs a rocket stove! Their video of the flames on the back of the stove is mesmerizing. I love watching fire. I picked up a chimanea on clearance at home deport for a song late last spring and fired it up for the first time this week. ME LOVE FIRE But if you insist, I will send you a picture of the Uuni in action.
    1 point
  15. Sometimes we get the most creative when we think we have nothing but find out we had it all
    1 point
  16. @KismetKamado It is probably an over simplification but I always thought of the back strap as essentially a deer NY Strp. It is the meat on the outside of the spine. If you look at a porterhouse steak, the tenderloin portion is from inside the spine, while the NY Strip on the other side of the bone is from the outside the spine.
    1 point
  17. just4fn

    Steak on the Barbee

    Getting ready to put the ribeye on in about an hour, around 7:00 pm
    1 point
  18. Ben S

    Chuckie is up to bat......

    Straight up food porn.
    1 point
  19. Coming from Melbourne I am glad the Tigers won the AFL. Really could not care less about the Storm......
    1 point
  20. I roasted the garlic cloves and mashed them into a paste and mixed them with just a bit of olive oil and some kosher salt before i whisked the mixture into some best foods mayo.
    1 point
  21. I went to John's videos for most of my initial "How To's". If I had a question.....John covered it in a video. PLUS Check out the Smash Burger video --- everyone RAVES when i make them! (its a simple beginner recipe). JOHN'S VIDEOS ARE THE GOTO FOR MOST EVERYTHING Check out his Pizza videos......he can make pizza better than most in Italy! Justin (BabyBackManiac), who is a member, has great videos as well....and does an outstanding job showcasing grill differences. Larry Beer n BBQ (also a member) also has some good stuff. I don't think I will ever brew beer (as it looks complicated), but he seems to give a nice explanation of the steps. Also -- HowtoBBQight Malcolm has some real good recipes once you get your feet wet.
    1 point
  22. Tasty looking wings.
    1 point
  23. Have to admit I didn't watch it, but I did hear the score! Ouch!
    1 point
  24. Now that's funny.
    1 point
  25. There's an idea. Biscuits and gravy with a side of patty sausage and over easy eggs with toast and Grilled Peach Reef Jam. Just now updated my breakfast order with Mrs skreef.
    1 point
  26. @Milt2tle not really. As i said in my smoke video, less is more when it comes to smoke. There simply are no cookie cutter solutions of any kind that ever work or produce results that can be duplicated consistently in a charcoal grill/smoker. Different types of wood produce different smoke intensities so the amount you use will vary from type to type. For that reason I still stand by my previous statement about trying things and see what works for you. If you dont do that and just go with what someone else suggests, you may never find your own sweet spot.
    1 point
  27. TKOBBQ

    TKOBBQ presents.......

    So got the handles put on the doors and drawers yesterday.
    1 point
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