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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/14/2018 in all areas

  1. This package would round out anyone's tool chest and at a great price.
    2 points
  2. Alright, I'm back after my first low-and-slow cook today to report on how it went. Firstly, thanks for the advice, guys. It got me through a couple of dark moments on this cook. First, let's introduce the star of this cook, a 3 lb butterball boneless turkey breast. I considered bone-in, but opted for the boneless as every bit of space counts in my little akorn jr... and to be honest, it's all I could find. After thawing the turkey breast out in the fridge, I brined it overnight in a mixture of salt, apple cider, apple cider vinegar, half an apple, half an onion, 5 or so cloves of garlic and a handful of fresh sage. In the morning, I got my akorn jr going by filling the fuel chamber to the tabs with royal oak hardwood lump, then lit a fire starter in the middle, and off we went toward my first dark moment of the cook... I left the lid open and let the starter get burning just a bit (WAY) too hot. Upon closing the lid, I got a LOT of smoke. I became self-conscious. Very self-conscious. I felt like I was smoking my neighbors in condos around me out (because I was). I felt like even though I knew it wasn't dangerous and just annoying, people would think I was being reckless. I didn't know if this amount of smoke was normal since it was my first low-and-slow cook, and I had never been around anyone else doing it. But something about the amount of smoke coming out of the vent and smoke even streaming out from the seal around the lip of the lid didn't seem right. Ha! But I didn't know what to do, so I just shut both vents and paced in my house nervously for a bit. I thought about quitting. Not just this venture, but smoking low-and-slow altogether. I had accepted that this is just how much smoke a low-and-slow smoking venture created, and even though it's been a new-found love that I've spent hours reading about and preparing for with my high-and-fast grilling on the Akorn Jr, adjusting the knobs, practicing with my smoking stone as a heat displacer, it had become clear to me the proximity of my patio to other units around simply meant my smoking days were over. I'd have to go camping to use my smoker I decided. BUT NO!!!! That burning, or should I say, smoking voice inside of me smoldered on. You've got it wrong! There's no way that much smoke is right. So I went back and checked the advice I had received on kamadoguru.com and a couple of things became clear. A) I was letting way too much air in from my bottom intake vent (open a couple of inches), which was sure to be the cause of smoke having nowhere to go but out every possible crack. And b) I was being a chicken. So I took a deep breath, opened my bottom vent just BARELY, then, as I had already been instructed to do by tips in previous posts, I opened my top vent just barely and already the amount of smoke was better. It was enough to see the white, but so little that dissipated almost immediately, and I was able to keep my patio door open. After adding my smoking stone and grill in, I added the turkey on a pan, closed the lid and paced nervously for 30 minutes while the temperature hung around 125, 150... I had stifled it too much! Dark moment number 2... But I decided, give it a tiny bit of air to come up and be patient. After 30 minutes I had it staying comfortably around 250-275, so I set a 2.5 hour timer and took it easy. After an hour and a half I checked the internal temperature of the middle of the breast, and was surprised to find it creeping up to 180. For a minute the smoker temperature had creeped up to the 300 range before I brought it down a tiny bit, so I'm guessing that is the reason it cooked faster than I expected. I took the turkey breast out and left it to rest for 30 minutes wrapped in aluminum, before cutting it. Even with being slightly overcooked and having a *tiny* bit of that stickiness between my teeth when I clenched down on it, it is juicy and divine! Definitely the best thing I've ever cooked. The brine really did its job, as it is definitely flavorful and just the right amount of salty. I'm really excited to do 4 of these guys (2 at a time) for thanksgiving this year, and very glad I did a test run. I'll practice a couple of low-and-slow salmon cooks before then to expedite the temperature lock-in, but will definitely shoot more for the 1.5 - 2 hr time to check for removing them so that I can get them out just before 165. One thing is for certain, I'm never buying turkey sandwich meat again. This is way cheaper and better than even the most expensive stuff I get at the deli. Big fan!
    2 points
  3. Here's the story to my first Kamado Joe Classic II low-n-slow BBQ brisket. So I have smoked a few on my Vision's but got to try out the KJCII this time since it was my brand new toy. It was definitely easier and better than the Vision IMO. Hard to think that there would be much difference, but there honestly is. I loaded the KJ up with coal & 2 mesquite chunks, lit the center and let it heat up to 250. While doing so, I trimmed and then let the brisket come up to room temp all while injecting and coating with the rub (brisket was 13 lbs. untrimmed). The injection: 8 oz coffee, at room temp a few shakes of Texas Pete. a few tablespoons of worcheshire The Rub: (sorry no real measurements) 1/4 C finely ground coffee 1/4 C dark brown sugar few table spoons chili powder some paprika black pepper salt onion powder garlic powder cocoa powder and cayenne to taste Inject every square inch and then let the liquid that has ran across the outside serve as my binder agent and apply rub. Let set about 5 minutes to soak in...flip and repeat on the other side. KJ's at temp, brisket is at room temp by this time. KJ set up with deflectors on the accessory rack in bottom position. Grates at top setting. Thermometer stuck in the meat, placed on the grill Friday at 11:30 p.m. and let cook all night without crutching. Waited until IT was 185 degrees and pulled from the KJ around 10:00 a.m. Saturday. Separated the flat and point, wrapped the flat and point, and poured about 1/4 cup coffee into the foil of both, bumped the grill temp to 300 degrees and placed back on the grill. The point hit 210 first, so I pulled it, cubed it, placed in disposable aluminum tray, slathered it with spicy Stubbs bbq sauce and placed back on the grill. I let that sit about 10 minutes and pulled it off...that was the burnt ends appetizer (sorry no pics for that, it was demolished for NCAA Football game day). Shortly after, the flat reached 210 degrees, pulled from the grill, and let rest about 1 hour. Total cook ended around 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Everything was delicious and tender. BLUF: I will definitely choose to use the KJ over the Vision for long smokes. Vision dies out after about 4 hours and is hard to maintain steady temps, while the KJ lasted 14 hours with no problem and rock steady at the temps chosen. Enjoy pics: (And yes, we are still friends after the DAWGS beat Auburn...Go DAWGS!) The Auburn fan drove from GA to my house in AL for the game...he said the loss was worth the brisket!
    2 points
  4. I decided to do a trial run on a Thanksgiving bird! I have to say, this is easily one of the best few I have ever tasted! As usual, I couldn’t cook without a beer in hand so I cracked one of the new Hop Butcher NIPA's and went to work!:) For this bird, I wanted to attempt a Sous-B-Q Turkey as I have never done one this way! I tried two different rubs on each half of the turkey to see which one I liked better... both were equally as good! Oh yeah, and this is the proper way to carve a bird. If you don’t know how to do this, make sure to check out a YouTube video or something! There is nothing worse than a dried out butchered up bird on Thanksgiving! I started out with deconstructing the bird and then bagging pieces individually. I then put it into the Sous Vide bath at 140 for 5 hours... Anyone cooking SV should def know how to calculate out when food has been fully pasteurized as its the biggest benefit to SV cooking (IMO). Once the bird was cook and safe, I then shocked it over night in an ice batch to get it out of the danger zone and safe as quick as possible... then refrigerated over night. Today, I opened up the packages, dried off the turkey and seasoned it up afternoon! Before doing this I fired up my Kamado for smoke/roasting to 400 and put one chunk of pecan wood. The turkey was put on and I let roast until IT of the bird hit 135 or so. I did use my torch to touch up the bird in a few places and finish it off a bit... Trial 100% successful... Definitely will be doing this again next Thursday! Cheers:) BC
    2 points
  5. I can say with today's breakfast.....it was much better than yesterday's protein shake on the way out the door. Hour-plus round trip to the doctor and 4 hour appointment/testing/consult for my wife & her doctor all went well. Very relieved. Confirmed & ruled out some stuff that had been concerning us. So relieved, in fact.....that we both slept 12+ hours last night....catching up on the missed sleep over the past few days. I can't remember last time I slept so long or so well. Relief and answered prayers evidently added to the comfort that cool weather and a warm blanket provided. Good stuff, folks. I still beat the sunrise on getting out of bed (which tells ya how early I crashed yesterday evening). Started stirring and dogs realized I was about to be oscar mike and went nutz to get downstairs and outside in hopes there would be squirrels to chase into the trees. Still too dark for that action, but coffee was made and by the second cup....I was able to go out and watch 'em get after the limb rats. Our oldest one still shows her puppy tendencies when she's on the chase. Their growling and yipping at the limb rats must have fired up my neighbor's dogs....could hear them waking up in her house. Time came to finish that cup and call in the dogs and get some grub ready. Nothing fancy. Nothing special. Just some buttery cheddar biscuits, Tennessee Pride Hot sausage (which I hit with yellow mustard) and eggs loaded with course pepper & American cheese. Had the biscuits cut and & the pan just in time to her a deep voice from above & behind me......"Good morning.....what's cooking?". Said Darth Vader voice came from our 6'8" son, Teenage T-Rex. Startled the heck outa both me & the dogs. For a kid so tall....he can ninja up on an old dude with great stealth. He went into feeding frenzy like a bull shark and rolled out his schedule for the day and asked about my cooking plans. I'd wanted to do Tex-Mex for dinner and gave him the menu rundown. He stopped me just in time. I was about to put the dry pintos on to soak all day for the frijoles later on. His schedule clashes mightily with said Tex-Mex dinner plans. Looks like there will be some mid-day burgers instead.....wife & I can reheat ours whenever it comes around to our dinnertime. Tex-Mex will be tomorrow night, it seems. Very grateful for such simple things to contemplate. Very grateful.
    2 points
  6. Please contain your mutual admiration; the food in these photos is unappealing, at best... my reaction is queasy. You can't fix poor lighting with a filter. You can make food highly unappetizing with software. It's the old sow's ear thing. Have fun, Frank
    2 points
  7. No sure what I'm looking at. I'll check their website and and get back to you......but, I can most likely say I'll pass. The BigJoe works out well on any pizza that I've cooked....easy to run. I put their elevated rack on top of the high position of the normal grates.....then the stones on top of extended rack. Gets it close enough to the dome to get nice radiant heat on the toppings.
    2 points
  8. Quite a sinking feeling when you are working on music and suddenly the screen goes grey. I guess the call it the 'grey screen of death' for a reason! After rebooting, I noticed the background of the screen was alternating stripes of red and black. A few reboots and attempts at trouble-shooting later, it never reached the recovery screen or would boot to the desktop. Finally, I think I heard it whisper, "it's been a privilege" before it gave up it's ghost. Anyway, it made for an interesting day trying to conduct our church service without a central component. And several hours later, I was able, grudgingly, to find a replacement. Now, I need to learn a new way of working since these hard drives are so ridiculously small without getting into even more ridiculous pricing. This 13" screen is also berry, berry tiny compared to my previous 17". Anyway, new MBP meet the KG forum. KG forum, meet the new MBP. Smiling to keep from crying.
    1 point
  9. Well as some of you seen I finally added a Kamado Joe to my arsenal. With that it made the need for a double cooker table. I began that journey Saturday and now all that’s left is to stain/protect the wood and in-lay the tile piece on the top. It’s made from Pine, most screws were hid in pocket holes and everything is glued. You can see my helper doing some sanding too, she also does oil changes in the dragster lol. Pics to come once I get the cookers in their holes.
    1 point
  10. These look good, thought I would share. Some interesting info in this one.
    1 point
  11. On a trip to La Jolla, California a while back, I had a nice light breakfast of avocado on toast with a couple of runny yolk overeasy eggs. This morning my wife is out for breakfast with her sister and I am left to my own supervision. My wife brought home some Boudin sourdough bread which I find surprisingly good for store bought fare. I also had some nice ripe Hass avocados, which have a very creamy texture and wonderful flavor. Left on my own, I decided to try to recreate the dish I had enjoyed at our vacation hotel. I used Montreal roasted garlic and herb blend and a little dried oregano as seasoning. I like my toast a little on the dark side. My big fat thumb broke one of the eggs so my dish is not exactly what I was going for, but it tasted very close to what I remember. With a nice cup of dark roast this is a wonderful breakfast.
    1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. Living in Wyoming, you must not drive that car very much, or too far outside your neighborhood to only have 61K miles on it.
    1 point
  14. Ditto. I keep a hatchet handy for those annoying big pieces.
    1 point
  15. I agree, I've worked on natural lighting for my hobby pics (antique related, not chow) and those make me queasy.. Best pics are in sunlight, or near a sunlight window.
    1 point
  16. That's the stuff I use(d) for flavor in my stick burner. Only way I use it in a Kamado is to bury it under a full bowl of good lump. Light high in the center (volcano method) and let it burn down to the wood. Burning charcoal above it will temper the smoke flavor, and since the smoking wood burns faster, you get a cavity at the bottom that naturally stirs up the charcoal. That said, I have a confession, I'm a reformed Akorn owner. Your panic time sounds very familiar. I can tell you that a Big Joe will eliminate the panic (as will cooking at 275F), but I have a cheaper thought. Try premium-chunk hardwood charcoal (eg. KJ Big Block) and no smoking wood. Fill the fire bowl loosely with golf ball- to fist-sized pieces, breaking down anything larger, so there's lots of space for air flow. Light top center (volcano). Big pieces should burn completely once they get lit, and burning takes a long time. Just never try to kill the fire, because chunks don't relight easily. I also have an ash basket in the BJ that lifts the fuel away from the walls. Getting that added air flow gives me a lot of latitude in burning-up dust if I want. Just not in the low-n-slow cooks. Don't underestimate the power of air flow. And your brisket looks none the worse for its ordeal; use it as a reference point next time. HAve fun, Frank
    1 point
  17. KismetKamado

    Faux Fajitas

    That sounds like a plan! The soapstone shines at high temps. I’m really kind of missing my Big Joe Soapstone / grate combo setup now that I am cooking on the kk on the deck instead of the Big Joe on my patio for winter. I was finding that really handy with the Big Joe real estate to run half soapstone and half standard grate as my regular everyday setup for grilling (the vast majority of my cooking). And extended vacation in a warmish place during winter doesn’t sound too bad....
    1 point
  18. I have never wrapped my deflectors and have never had an issue. I give them a little scrape when I am done cooking and flip the next cook.
    1 point
  19. Nice looking table, you all did a fine job on it. It's always nice to have helpers.
    1 point
  20. I built this for Left Lane slow pokes in front of me!
    1 point
  21. My kind of breakfasts. Those biscuits look amazing! Mind sharing the recipe?
    1 point
  22. Thanks, man. Favorite meal of the day on those day's off we get. Good strong coffee & chilling with the dogs and then get stuff ready before the house wakes up. Thanks. Let's just say they are mighty fond of when I'm here and firing up a grill or breaking out a skillet. They know they get their pirate's share of the loot. They each had some steak this morning. I held off on letting them have the T-bone bones. So......this morning I wiped out the last of the T-bonz. I used the strip side for an omelet for my wife.......and kept the tenderloin side for myself with some cheesy scrambled eggs. Gotta love a steak that you can slice with your fork. She said the sweet red pepper came through hugely in terms of flavor.
    1 point
  23. Boomer

    Leadership Board

    How do I get... a new car?!
    1 point
  24. I didn't take a lot of pictures during my testing. This device holds heat deflectors below the pizza stone. It works really well when you use it as it is designed to be used. The production model has had a few changes made to it that I have not tested first hand.
    1 point
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