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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 10 points
    ckreef

    Baked Apples a la mode

    Here is my Sweets For Your Sweetie entry. A very simple recipe but tastes fantastic and very sweet. The basic ingredients. Made an apple juice, brown sugar, and cinnamon sauce. Not to thick. Set aside to cool. Next I made a crumble topping. Cut up the apples. Divide the sauce between the bowls. Add the crumble topping. I made three slightly different versions. Bake indirect at 350* until the crumble topping browns up. Served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Very sweet for my sweetie.
  2. 8 points
    MD_Ag

    Cast Iron Tarte Tatin

    I wasn't kidding when I said I was looking forward to a Great British Bake-off / Kamado crossover. I've wanted to do a tarte tatin for a while, but it is an intimidating dish. Turns out I should have done this long ago. The natural sweetness of the apples combines with the buttery pastry and kamado smoke to create an excellent dessert. The Mrs. was very pleased. It all started with a from scratch puff pastry. A real one, not a rough puff. The dough is fairly simple, but the magic comes from the sandwiched layers of butter. I did two regular turns, then a book turn, then a final turn. Each process needed an hour in the fridge to cool. Now for the filling. A simple caramel was made from 235 g of sugar and half a cup of water. You're looking for a lighter brown color. Once done, pour directly into the skillet (pre-greased with 1 tbsp butter). Important note: no matter how good the caramel looks, do not try to get a swipe with your finger. You will get a bad blister immediately. The caramel will, however, taste delicious. The apples were honey crisp. I believe I used five (probably should have used at least one more). Used a quick corer, then cut the wedges in half. Arrange the bottom layer on top of the caramel in a nice pattern, since this is basically an upside down cake. Then pile the rest of the apples in. Roll out the dough to cover the entire skillet. Cut off the excess, but leave enough that you can tuck the edges down between the apples and the side. While the tart was cooking, I used the excess dough to make some quick cinnamon turnovers. Now assembled, put on the grill at 400-425°. Bake for about 40 minutes and check for doneness. I went for 45 overall. Allow the tart to cool, then the moment of truth: turning it out. Any extra juices should be poured back over the apples. While the grill was still hot, I cooked up some bacon wrapped sweet and sour shrimp. A slice of tarte tatin and a glass of port was a great end to this celebratory meal.
  3. 6 points
    Tarheel

    Old Standby Delivers Again!

    Nice warm weather called for my second cook of the week. Decided to do one of my favorite kamado cooks, an old standby that has never let me down: smoked meatloaf. If you're reading this and have never smoked a meatloaf then you need to try it, soon. Without a doubt one of the largest improvements vs. conventional cooking of just about anything I can think of. I pretty much followed John's recipe, except increased the soy sauce and added a TBS Worcestershire sauce.
  4. 4 points
    Quick dinner tonight before the family heads south for a week of vacation. Seasoned two top sirloin steaks with Oakridge BBQ Carne Crusta rub and then grilled them on the Kamado Joe. Once the steaks were seared on one side I added a thyme, garlic, and rosemary compound butter to each steak. Pulled the steaks when they were at 135 degrees internal. As a side I roasted some fingerling potatoes in the cast iron skillet with oil, shallots, and garlic. Everything turned out great! Now it’s time for some rest and relaxation at the beach.
  5. 4 points
    ckreef

    Surf and Turf, Grate and Skewers

    Surf and Turf on the Konro. This is my preferred method for steak kabobs. Start by cooking your steaks low-n-slow until an IT of 110*. Let them cool. Trim the edges, cube them, and marinade them a bit. Steak kabobs and small dwell in the shell lobster Tails ready to go. Meanwhile I had some green beans going on the KK. A few on grill shots. Done this way the steak kabobs end up a nice md rare with just the right amount of char. With Baked Apples a la mode for desert.
  6. 4 points
    Those that know me, know I like the flavors of the Med, so why should my Sweets for my Sweety cook be any different? My wife says she has never met a pizza she did not like, so I decided on a Med flavored sweet pie to put a twinkle in her eye. I used Ken Forkish's 24 -72 hour 70% hydration dough and stretched out a nice 12" pie. I put down a layer of whole milk Moz with some pizza spices, garlic, and a bit of crushed red pepper. On top of that I added some nice plump dried black figs sliced thin, crumbled fresh local goat cheese, shredded prosciutto, and arugula. To top it off, and to make it extra sweet, I added a heavy drizzle of Lemon and Fig Marmalade. Figs are not in season now so I used dried ones. I is important that you find dried figs that still have moisture and softness, if they feel like cardboard they will also taste that way. I found the Whole Lemon Fig Marmalade in a specialty foods shop on Main Street. Just a wonderful tasting pie, plenty sweet, but also quite savory and interesting. My wife said it is definitely a keeper. Here's a pic of the black figs and the Whole Lemon Fig Marmalade The evening was dramatic with nice storm cloud formations This is what the pie looked like on the peal On the Egg at 600 degs Da money shot, sliced and ready to enjoy
  7. 3 points
    I was asking around on another forum about getting a custom grill grate made and was referred to: The Burn Shop http://theburnshopwf.com/ I sent him my design idea.... he promptly sent me this proof: I couldn't shell out the money fast enough.... shortly after that I got an email with this photo: 3/16" carbon steel... This is a 21.5" grate that I'm gonna use in my drum smoker...
  8. 3 points
    landscaper

    Sous Vide vs. reverse sear

    coo coo cach-oo!
  9. 2 points
    pesto3

    Chicken and Chips on the Big Joe

    Chicken thighs semi indirect and thick cut wedges fried on the Big Joe.
  10. 2 points
    KismetKamado

    Dinner

    Not much else to say other than, this was dinner. Cold here. Would have fired up a kamado no problem except for the fact I was tied up with work. Inside was easy and fast. Put together some easy pasta Alfredo. Love my Advantium microwave. Grilled a a flat iron on an indoor grill. Ran it through a jaccard and marinated it for a couple hours before cooking it. Chupacabra marigate is awesome. Sliced up and ready to go.
  11. 2 points
    keeperovdeflame

    Cheap Dough Proof Box

    I am going to make a couple pies tomorrow so I made some dough this afternoon while watching the Pebble Beach Golf Tournament. I made three Ken Forkish dough balls and as I shaped them and put them in the fridge for the 2nd fermentation, I thought it might be helpful to some to share my "ultra high tech custom dough proof box" (NOT). Actually, I use one of those throw away thin Zip Lock food boxes you can find next to the Zip Lock storage bags in the market. I think they came in a package of three for pretty cheap. I use a size large, and put a small squirt of olive oil on the bottom and then rub it over the surface of the bottom and sides. Drop the dough balls in, seal the lid, and pop it in the fridge until I make the pies tomorrow. I find it works extremely well. Ken's book says to use a dinner plate for the three balls and cover the dough with cling wrap, but that always seemed to not seal as tightly or as firmly as I wanted it to.
  12. 2 points
    Tarheel

    Ribeye Cap Steak Cook

    Free time and warm weather finally aligned to allow for a cook! Pulled a prime ribeye cap steak (Costco) out of the freezer and gave it a go. It was tied into a hockey puck shape with butcher's twine. I decided to remove this and cook it like a more conventionally shaped steak, figuring this would create more surface area for my rub and for the maillard reaction. Dry rub was sea salt, black pepper, garlic, onion, parsley and smoked sea salt. Served with mashed yukon gold potatoes and a salad. Tasty!
  13. 2 points
    Gave it a try, I wagged the spices to taste and just two chipotles. I have a similar look, though I have not added any noodles yet. Thanks for the meal plan!
  14. 2 points
    And just like that, it got to room temp and poured overtop some 1.5” thick pork chops. It will brine overnight for a cook tomorrow.
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    Never L8 4 chow

    Granola, Pizza, and a movie

    The rest of the cook. Yep, that's a heat deflector used as a pizza stone Simple pizza and a movie.
  17. 1 point
    freddyjbbq

    Some Jalapeño Poppers

    Hate to admit it, but I followed Diva-q’s recipe once and have developed somewhat of an addiction. never any leftovers
  18. 1 point
    gotzero

    Rotisserie Glazed Pineapple

    I was thrilled that the challenges returned, and then quickly thought to myself, "what in the world am I going to do for dessert?". We are not big dessert makers or eaters here, and our go tos are usually fruit based. I looked around for grilled fruit desserts, and found one (gasp, on a website for a gasser) that involved all of the following wonderful things: pineapple. bourbon, grill, and rotisserie. So, I set out to make bourbon glazed rotisserie pineapple on a kamado. I intended to make the wings on the big joe, and then rotisserie the pineapple on the classic. However, the classic heated up almost instantly, while the big joe took its sweet time, so I switched grills, crammed the wings in the classic, and used an extra large kamado to rotisserie one pineapple. With some welding gloves, I was pleasantly surprised how fast and easy it was to switch the intended cook with both grills. While the wings cooked, I began giving the pineapple coats of the bourbon/brown sugar/butter glaze. The wings came off, and we very much enjoyed them (tequila lime seasoning mixed with baking powder, 20 minutes a side indirect at 350). These end up being crispy just like fried wings with a wonderful moist center. I still cannot believe how easy and tasty this wing cook is, I still get lost in the "magic" of the kamado. Back to the pineapple. All that lid opening leads to a little more fire. The smell coming off the big joe indicates I am going to enjoy this dessert. Done. And served with some ice cream. We all loved this, and joked that the chicken wings were probably healthier than the pineapple. I am absolutely going to make this again. It was so easy, plated really well, and everyone young to old enjoyed it. Thanks again for getting me out of my comfort zone!
  19. 1 point
    CentralTexBBQ

    Restaurant Depot

    I guess I should have added that my RD offers two grades of choice on brisket- a USDA choice as mentioned above and a CAB choice which I have cooked along side the Costco Prime. I could not tell the difference in taste, texture, tenderness, etc. So, I am not totally in on the quality of the meat- at least that I buy there- not being high. Costco, yes, has higher quality pork ribs, steaks, etc. but, at a significantly higher price per pound. I have not purchased butts at Costco because they are not bone in. The beef plate ribs from RD are fantastic...
  20. 1 point
    keeperovdeflame

    Cheap Dough Proof Box

    Gotta step up quick girlfriend, probably cost you about 5 bucks for three of them. However once the craze gets out and catches on, they will put a fancy proof box logo on them and charge four times as much. especially if BGE makes them.
  21. 1 point
    CentralTexBBQ

    Restaurant Depot

    Other than the spices mentioned, I think RD is most useful to those cooking for large groups. I buy perhaps 90% of my briskets from there. I also bet bone in pork butts 2 per pack for the price of buying one in the local grocery. You can get a variety of large cuts at decent pricing. The spare ribs, baby racks also come at a very good price. But, like Costco, you will not walk out with just one slab.
  22. 1 point
    ckreef

    Granola, Pizza, and a movie

    Never thought of homemade granola. It all looks good.
  23. 1 point
    I really need to think of something. I have no clue what to make though.
  24. 1 point
    ckreef

    Surf and Turf, Grate and Skewers

    Thanks Scott. It's been a while since I had some tail (lobster that is ) Dwell in the shell always comes out spot on. Wasn't sure how it would cook on the Konro. Just needed an extra min or so since it's not totally surrounded by heat like in a kamado.
  25. 1 point
    Don't forget your Sweetie needs something sweet
  26. 1 point
    To answer your question, none yet.... Just the Vision pro c that I really like and enjoy. I would like to add a Jr or other smaller sized Kamado in the spring.
  27. 1 point
    St1brew

    Baked Apples a la mode

    Awesome job, looks wonderful! I'm sure you both enjoyed it.
  28. 1 point
    Oh yes, congratulations on the new Joe. Is it the Classic?
  29. 1 point
    philpom

    Sous Vide vs. reverse sear

    Interesting to read your experience, I always sear my sous vide steaks on a piping hot grill but I can see your points about using the cast iron. Thanks for sharing @dirty6
  30. 1 point
    KismetKamado

    Sous Vide vs. reverse sear

    @Walrus Sometimes copy / paste results in a different font / size. No biggie. I enjoyed reading the post. Not sure the comment about font size was necessary or relevant.
  31. 1 point
    freddyjbbq

    Restaurant Depot

    You have a good memory sir! And on a side note I saw 2 bags KJ big block lump at O’Connor hardware this morning (BGE yes, kJ grills, no) anywho, to answer brads question is it RD worth the membership? to be honest, RD is more about quantity than quality & it was the only place that I could find that stocks a full packer brisket (choice grade or the rd grade which may/may not be select) With the exception of the selection of Cambro containers, pizza peels & pans, I much prefer Costco to RD. i think you might be referring to the RD on dascomb road in Andover? I recommend going there and just walking past the card scanner and having a look around before you spend $$ on KCbs
  32. 1 point
    Never L8 4 chow

    Dinner

    And it looks delicious!
  33. 1 point
    Stile 88

    Restaurant Depot

    RD is for the resturants in your your area at wholesale prices so is definitely worth it to get a membership i go at least twice a month for various meats spices ect when i make chicken burgers rd is the place to go to get what you need
  34. 1 point
    Granola looks great! Not sure I’ve seen that done on a Kamado before. Great use of a warm grill and a fun experiment. And of course the pizza looks fantastic, too. That goes without saying.
  35. 1 point
    Tarheel

    Old Standby Delivers Again!

    That's a miniature broiling pan out of an old toaster oven, works really well for meat loaf on the kamado.
  36. 1 point
    Charcoal Addict

    Kontrol Tower Vent Issues

    You have to clean it more often than the older vents. Aluminum is more likely to stick when it gets greased up. You need to degrease it more often than the CI vents. Soaking the Kontrol Tower in a hot tub full of PBW pub wash does the trick. As long as you clean it once a month in a 3- hour PWB hot tub soak you should be fine. The Kontrol is not forgiving if you don’t clean it regularly. It’s far more likely to jam or seize if you don’t clean it regularly.
  37. 1 point
    dirty6

    Sous Vide vs. reverse sear

    I have an obnoxiously long answer to this question based on recent learning. I’ve culled most of this text from a “lessons learned” email I sent to a friend, so apologies if some of the context isn’t quite right/clear. The tl/dr version is that the reverse sear method helped me to see some mistakes I was making when doing sous vide. Read on for the details. I have been cooking sous vide for the better part of 4 years now; we got a kamado grill less than a year ago. We consistently enjoyed sous vide steaks and raved at how well they turned out. Upon trying the reverse sear, I almost immediately was convinced that sous vide was inferior. Over time while cooking with reverse sear, I learned that we were making some sous vide mistakes. In theory, when the reverse sear steaks come off the grill at low temp they have been cooked in a similar manner as a sous vide steak (low and slow, from the inside out, cooked from end to end to the same doneness). But, we noticed right away that the pre-finished reverse sear steaks didn’t look like the pre finished sous vide steaks. The difference was that the reverse sear steaks were *dry* on the exterior. We had always observed that sous vide steaks come out of the bag wet, b/c what little juice they had lost in the cook had gone nowhere. The steak juice had stayed right there in the bag surrounding the steak. So out of the bag, the steaks were wet. I learned/read that a key variable to making a great sear is to ensure you have a dry exterior. The realization was this: when the sous vide steaks came out of the bag wet and we tossed them on the cast iron, the energy of the cast iron was mostly expended by evaporating the extra moisture from the exterior of the steak. Therefore, the steak didn’t crust up like we wanted it to. Less crust=less flavor. The light bulb with the reverse sear method was when i noticed that the steaks came off of the grill pre-sear nice and dry, and then when i seared them they crusted right up. The other lessons were less impactful but still meaningful. I think we were using the cast iron wrong. We have long been inculcated with the 1st cardinal rule of a cast iron*, which is never use the cast iron skillet past medium b/c it will burn the snot out of whatever you’re cooking. *but not always In the past I would sous vide the steak and then heat the cast iron to almost medium. I’d put butter in the skillet as it warmed up so that it melted and was ready for the steak. But, that didn’t let the cast iron get hot enough for a proper sear—and even worse, I was starting the sear before the pan warmed up to medium b/c the butter would start to burn. After observing all that we decided to tweak our sous vide technique a little bit. First, we made sure to dry off the exterior of the steaks thoroughouly with paper towels after pulling them out of the bag. Next, I got the cast iron on the stove and turned that mother up to 11 like I was Michael J Fox at the beginning of the first Back to the Future. AFTER the pan was smoking hot, I put butter in it. And that butter VIOLENTLY sizzled. And then I put a DRY steak in there. And 45 seconds later, I had a buttery delicious crust. To review my prior mistakes: cast iron not hot enough for sear, butter added too soon which forced an even lower cast iron temp, soggy wet steaks...all three mistakes robbed the searing process. Before, I’d have a beautifully cooked steak that had no crust b/c the finishing process wasn’t well executed, which meant the texture of the steak was perfect but it lacked a flavor. This is what initially blew my mind with the kamado reverse sear: still beautifully cooked, plus amazing flavor. I say all that to answer your question: Initially, yes, I tried reverse sear and swore off sous vide forever. However, I’ve been able to use the experience from reverse sear cooking to inform my sous vide cooking, and now I feel like I have got both methods pretty well dialed in. Today, I would say that I’m not “done” with sous vide. Instead, I recognize that both methods bring a different strength in flavor profile. For my taste, reverse sear is better if the dinner menu calls for good smoky, charcoal flavor and I have the time to spend on the grill to achieve that. Sous vide is better if the dinner menu calls for any of the options that sous vide lends itself to: aromatics (rosemary in the sous vide bag? butter? check), a pan sauce (that steak juice in the sous vide bag is money when it comes time to make a quick sauce), or time/ease of cooking.
  38. 1 point
    Ben S

    Dinner

    Pasta huh?
  39. 1 point
    Yup! That's the grate that inspired me to get mine
  40. 1 point
    Tex

    Field cast iron.

    Finally getting a reason to fire up the new Field cast iron. Picked up a couple of 21 day rib eyes and we're gonna do the reverse sear and we'll need some bacon for the baked taters. The Field kicked butt on the bacon!! Absolutely no sticking!!! Pretty impressive for the first thing we put in it.
  41. 1 point
    This is my third build and I am gonna keep this one. Cooking on a homemade smoker is just fun
  42. 1 point
    I totally agree with @keeperovdeflame. 250* is way low for chicken. It'll end up way too Smokey (chicken can take on a lot of smoke) and rubbery skin. I like 400* for about 1 1/2 hours. As @K_sqrd pointed out 2 chickens will basically cook in the same time frame as 1 chicken. The only exception to that is if you had a small kamado and 2 chickens seriously over crowded it. Then it would probably take more time (think 2 chickens crammed into a Jr sized kamado)
  43. 1 point
    No such thing as a dumb question, friend, just a request for needed info. I actually learned to kamado cook on a Vision, so it makes me a bit uncomfortable to question their cooking instructions, but I find that I must. IMO the optimum dome temp for chicken cooked indirect is 375, with a climb up to 400-425 at the end of the cook. I cook chicken by internal temperature and not time. When a probe in the chickens breast reads 165 I pull it, regardless of how long it has been on the grill. That said and to answer your actual question, I think I to 2 hours will cook both birds. My cooking times are pretty close to that but I am at 375 not 250 I would think your cooking time at 250 would actually be significantly longer than vision quotes. I have found through experience that cooking chicken at lower temps for longer times, does not give me crisp skin or super moist juicy meat, and I like the results from higher temp cooks much better. If you go with the 250 temp, I would not rely on time alone and would check the birds with either a wired temp probe or an instant read thermometer looking for 165 to 170 IT in the breast. Happy Cooking.
  44. 1 point
    Edward Cook

    Old Standby Delivers Again!

    Wow .. that looks great ... I've gotta try this!
  45. 1 point
    DerHusker

    Super Bowl Wings & Thangs!

    Spent an uneventful time at home watching it rain outside most of the weekend. The one thing we could do was prepare for the Super Bowl. What goes good while watching a football game? Wings & Thangs of course. I’ve made these Honey Sriracha Chicken Wings and Buffalo Chicken Potato Skins before and they turned out great so I made them again and decided to share the pics. See link for detailed recipe and cooking method: https://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/38718-honey-sriracha-chicken-wings-and-buffalo-chicken-potato-skins/ All I got this time were these plated shots They were extremely delicious just like the last time. Thanks for looking.
  46. 1 point
    My wife is home putting these butts on my Timbetline 850. She put them on & pressed the ignite button & I took over with my smart phone app (30 miles away) send me pics , she’s doing just fine !!
  47. 1 point
    KismetKamado

    Black Akorn Jr not in stock?

    Ordered my Akorn Jr black from Lowe’s. Had to have the black. Even though I already had a red... and a backup red. I sold the backup red to make it seem less crazy.
  48. 1 point
    ckreef

    The Kamado Joe Do-Joe

    Since you have already been thinking about a WFO this is just going to make you long for one even more. WFO's are more than just the temperature possibilities it's really all about the total experience
  49. 1 point
    Scott Roberts

    Kamander first low & slow

    So this is for tomorrow, I have to work so this part is done! Scott
  50. 1 point
    John Setzler

    Man Cave Meatloaf

    It's Tonya's grill
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