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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/21/2019 in all areas

  1. We decided to make crab cakes and cheddar bay biscuits for dinner tonight and I didn't feel like using the gassers so I tried something I've never done before which is skillet cooking over a charcoal fire. I started by cleaning out the KJ Classic charcoal basket and filling it with the BB already in the egg, then placing the basket in the middle of the grate and lighting in 3 spots. After letting the fire get up and running I preheated the skillet then added some olive oil and the crab cakes a minute later. The cook went well although i did sendup raising the cooking grid as things were getting a little too hot. I served them up with the biscuits that I baked in the KJ.
    3 points
  2. If you want to play: http://mcm2019.football.cbssports.com/e/d397a0863ae8c1ea0617dc4467ea8b500375f81a803adcf7?ttag=FFBC19_cpy_invite_new_mt This year's prize package is awesome.... Kamado Joe Classic 3 Grill from Kamado Joe Classic Joetissery and 12 pack of seasonings from Atlanta Grill Company $100 gift card from Porter Road Butcher
    2 points
  3. It’s Alive Igor, it’s Alive! I breathed life into it. Sarcasm aside, it’s been a long 3 days. My unbleached flour sourdough starter finally started to rise today. It didn’t do much but bubble during the first two days. I’m looking forward to making my first Rustic Sourdough bread. A lot people make bread after 7 days. We’ll have to wait and see if my starter will pass the float test after day 7. Choosing a recipe will be the hardest part. There’s so many sourdough recipes, it’s hard to choose a clear winner.
    2 points
  4. Small pork loin roast marinaded and injected with Wegmans Spiedie marinade that I cooked @250F until IT hit 135F and then reverse seared over a bed of blazing hot KJBB coals. Served up with some red skin potato salad and finished off with a CI skillet brownie I baked on the KJ for dessert, not bad for a Tuesday.
    2 points
  5. Here's another question that I get asked frequently: Hi John I was referred to you by [source deleted]. I’m very new to cooking with a KJ so trying to learn quickly. Most recipes call for cooking at a certain temp, presumably as shown on the KJ thermometer. Recognizing that the temp at the grate level is typically hotter by 20-50 degrees than the dome temp (which is what the thermometer is measuring ). Does the suggested cooking temp take into consideration this variation. I’ve heard that there’s lots of debate on the internet about this subject. Some suggest using a monitor that registers grate level temp. If so, how does one reconcile with the recipes suggested cooking temp. All the best, [Name removed] *********** In all MY cooking and in my recommendations to others, I use the dome temperature. The dome temperature is the most consistent temperature reading inside your kamado grill. On the occasions where I use temperature controllers to operate my grill, I still use the dome temperature as my reference. I normally clip my electronic grill temperature probe directly to the stem of the dome thermometer so it will be as close as possible. If I am unable to do that for some reason, I use the temperature controller to make my DOME thermometer read at or near my desired temperature regardless of what the digital temperature at the grate reads. Electronic probes placed directly at grate level will be inconsistent for many reasons. There are a few specific reasons that these readings are inconsistent. Electronic probes placed close to food on the grill will actually be cooled by their proximity to that food. Electronic probes placed too close to the outer edge of the grill will be heated by the hot air rising from around the heat deflectors. Food dripping grease or condensation on your probes will make their readings inconsistent. Finding the perfect balance of this can be tricky and will always, in my personal experience, be rather inconsistent. For ME, consistency is a higher value target than accuracy. 20 to 50 degrees variation at any given time in the grill is not going to make or break your cook. If it would, a majority of my cooks would be failures since I pay zero attention to any temperature at the grate level. When cooking over heat deflectors, the temperature variations you see between the dome thermometer and the grate temperature will normally stabilize and normalize when the when the lid is left closed. Frequent lid opening will keep these two readings well apart from each other. One part of being a successful grill chef is being able to tell when the food is done. Grills are, by nature, not as consistent as the average indoor oven. But Kamado grills and other computer controlled grills are challenge that idea very nicely most of the time. Your hands, eyes, and taste buds are more important tools for determining a successful cook than your thermometers and timers. Use these tools as reference only to get you CLOSE to the target. Use your human five senses to get you across the finish line Cheers and enjoy cooking on your grill!
    1 point
  6. John Setzler

    Griswold #3

    I got this Griswold #3 on Ebay and it just arrived today. It's really cruddy so it went into the lye bath which should remove all of it. I'll take smoe mpre pictures after get it restored...
    1 point
  7. philpom

    Don't drool, I did

    Love short ribs, a great piece of beef. These cooked at about 250°f for about 2 hours with mesquite wood. Basted with a blend of honey, Bragg's and lemon juice - equal parts. I present beef short ribs Tasty as can be, served with a chopped Asian salad.
    1 point
  8. dh14ster

    OK Boys and girls

    I haven't seen much pizza on here lately, so maybe to tickle the readership I thought I'd post some recent pies. On this journey my craft hasn't taken any real leaps, but I will reiterate that 00 flour, a simple San Marzano tomato sauce, 48 hour proofing in the fridge, a laser thermometer, stacked pizza stones (with 1.5" between), and imported fresh meats and cheeses from the Italian grocery have really helped me up my game to the point where my wife, who generally does not like pizza, will brag to friends and family that mine are very good. After all, that's what it's all about. I see a lot of discussion about parchment paper, corn meal, etc. as a lubricant, and I have tried them all. I have come to realize that if you build the pie on the peel, give it a good shake at each stage of construction, and assertively launch it onto the stone, you will be fine with just a moderate dusting of AP flour. I keep my temps around 550-660*F, and I'm cooking these on my Akorn. First I do a Pizza Margherita to pay homage to the "original" pizza. Then I make one of my favorites, a pepper and fennel sausage pie (Anthony Tassinello tries to evoke the eponymous sausage and peppers with this one and it is surprisingly good!), and finish up with a pepperoni, sausage, and onion, extra cheese special. I am using a mix of buffalo mozzarella and low-moisture mozz, plus lots of fresh basil and garlic. Anyway, have a great summer, enjoy the warm weather, and I hope to see some pictures of your passion!
    1 point
  9. Red River Smoke

    Low country boil

    We had a fun night of doing a low country/seafood boil last night, hadn't done one of these in a long time! Used the Louisiana Crawfish Boil seasoning and it was really good, quite a bit spicier than I remember Zatarain's being, but that was just fine with me. Got some really nice big shrimp from Costco, decent little lobster tails from local grocery a couple types of sausage and new local potatoes and sweet corn. It got really quiet on the deck when I dumped that basket of food out! Cooked it with my 30 quart turkey fryer, sorry, no action shots, but I'm sure that we've all seen a pot of water boiling before.
    1 point
  10. ckreef

    Reef's Lump Comparison

    Jealous Devil hasn't been tested yet. I have a bag on the way to the house. Will get it tested over the next few weeks.
    1 point
  11. Jack.

    Reef's Lump Comparison

    Welcome SSgt93.
    1 point
  12. SSgt93

    Reef's Lump Comparison

    Great info in here @ckreef. I appreciate your efforts in this.
    1 point
  13. I do, and they have a forum here for souse vide + kamado. The souse vide is an amazing tool.
    1 point
  14. buckleybj

    Hamburger Quesadilla

    Decided to grill some burgers for lunch today, but realized I didn't have buns. I did however have some tortillas Deliciousness ensued.
    1 point
  15. As you feed the starter, you discard a portion. Take that portion and spread it pretty thin on foil or parchment paper. Let that sit out over night and the next day you will have dry flakes. They store indefinitely in the freezer.
    1 point
  16. Yeah, I used a true Nepolitan dough with '5 Stagioni' 00 flour, 59% hydration, some sea salt, and a bit of yeast. No oil. No sugar. So I don't think the dough is the problem. At 900F it just cooks too fast. Literally turns black upon contact and by 15 seconds, it's already getting too charred. At 700F, the cook takes ~4 minutes, you can 'watch' for doneness of the toppings through the vent, and everything is great except there is no Neopolitan-style char on the bottom of the crust: That crust is not bad, but it lacks the flavor component contributed by more charring. I'm going try 800F before giving up, but I've concluded that 900F on a Kamado is unfortunately out of reach (makes little sense, as several have warned me).
    1 point
  17. philpom

    New Akorn Jr Damage

    Welcome to Kamado Guru @Zelphy If the deal was so good that you don't want to return it then you are obligated to deal with the small spots of missing porcelain. If it was me I would make sure there is no loose pieces around the damage or if there was I would clean it up and rub some veggie oil on it occasionally as I cooked on it until it was cured over. Any kind of paint you put in there will likely just burn off. I would guess it would be fine in the long run. Good luck!
    1 point
  18. Thanks Chris that helps. I think I'm 1) Lighting to much charcoal for the low and slow 2) Not being patient enough for the higher temp (300 - 400F) for the higher temp stuff. Thanks again. Walt
    1 point
  19. I hope you mean Auburn, GA or else there is a town in GA this old retired revenue agent never heard of.
    1 point
  20. Alphonse

    Grill Dome shell repair?

    Coming back to this in case it is valuable for others later. I ultimately repaired the grill per Grill Dome's recommendation using JB Weld after looking at other alternatives. I used some painter's tape and cardboard to build a ledge and cast the repair. I let it cure a couple of days, re-gasketed top and bottom with Rutland gaskets, and eventually brought it up low and slow to cure both the repair and the new gaskets. This particular grill is at our camp so it doesn't see a lot of duty but it has been used a dozen times since the repair and seems to be holding its own.
    1 point
  21. Yup, Figs and Goat Cheese are the best. Try this, basically the same thing but melted. I use a tiny lodge cast iron skillet, mix the goat cheese with a little Mozzarella so it melts smooth. Chopped herbs, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, garlic, and chopped figs. You can also sprinkle a bit of arugula on top. In this particular variation, I put a spoon full of fig preserves in the center. Start by spreading a bit of olive oil over the pan surface so the cheese won't stick. Another variation is to use whole black grapes, just plop them in the middle of the cheese. The grapes bake and turn soft and spreadable. Wonderful natural flavors.
    1 point
  22. Sorry its been a while since I was over here... The reason that the meat goes in with no seasoning is fairly simple... The first is that based on studies the only thing that can penetrate meat protein is smoke and salt. Knowing that, when you season before cooking sous vide, most of that seasoning is washed off by the juices that come out of the meat (and mostly dumped out/down the drain). If you season after, those seasonings get "chared" into the meat/a "crust" is formed, giving it flavor! If you want to try an experiment, cook a pierce of meat... season it up... cut all the ends off/crust off and see what you actually taste. If you are cooking on a Kamado, you will get the smoke and salt if it was there. You will not get any other seasoning that were on the meat... esp if you ensure that the meat does not touch anything other than a clean fork and knife. Many people will not and do not buy it, and in all honesty its not anything I care to debate. IMO spices are pricey... I choose to use them after and get the benefits I believe it gives. If you think that the spices and seasonings give the meat flavor, then go nuts!!
    1 point
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