Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/31/2020 in all areas

  1. I didn't intend on this being part of the March challenge as I haven't yet participated, but here it goes. I have had the Joetisserie for a few months now and am always looking for a reason to use it. Since it's the time of year lamb is grilled, braised, smoked, etc. I've seen several post and decided to give it a try on the spit. Picked up a 4 lb leg of lamb as Costco and followed a marinade recipe online: https://www.food.com/recipe/greek-lamb-rotisserie-grill-methods-229788 Ingredients for the marinade are: 3 to 4 tablespoon lemons, juice and zest of 1⁄4 cup olive oil 6 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon thyme 1 teaspoon oregano 1 teaspoon rosemary 1 bay leaf salt and pepper I marinaded overnight and then set it up on the Joe for around 2 hours until the internal temp was 135. Since it was thicker in the middle the internal temps weren't consistent but it worked well because I like mine more on the rare side and the wife likes hers a little more done. All in all I was very happy with the experience and will be adding lamb to my rotation.
    4 points
  2. prowe

    KK had a little lamb...

    when I first met my mother in law we were talking about food, and I mentioned I hate lamb. she replied that she would make sure she was serving lamb the next time I came to visit. she was not kidding.
    3 points
  3. Had what I thought was a single lamb rack in the fridge all week. Decided I better go ahead and get the dreaded lamb cook over with, so pulled it out of the fridge today. Ends up there are 2 per package.... ugh. At least that solved the problem of deciding whether to cook it as a rack or as lollipops. Decided to go with a simple garlic herb marinade. One rack whole and one cut into lollipops. Let them marinate for several hours with the garlic and herbs. Worked on a bread project in the meantime. I’m definitely not a baker and this wasn’t super successful, but was edible. No commercial yeast at all - just my sourdough starter. Onto the grill on an upper rack at about 450. Then once I pulled that, out the lollipops on down on the lower rack. Grilled some asparagus for a side. And plated. So now I can say I’ve been there and done that... and don’t need to do it again. Think I’m happy to stick with moo, cluck and oink from here on out.
    2 points
  4. ckreef

    KK had a little lamb...

    @prowe no worries you're not the only one who forgets. I don't have to worry - last year Mrs skreef admitted she forgot before I remembered
    2 points
  5. Her name is Barbara. I met her on Tinder. Before that, it was Jennifer. I met her on Ashley Madison before they went bust. Not sure why you’re asking such personal questions about side girls in this sub-forum. Seems like it should go in The Cooler or Do-It-Yourself sub-forum. Edit: ignore my post. I misread the title.
    2 points
  6. I did my first rib cook yesterday. Though next time I will change a few recipe items, the ribs came out cooked and smoked really nicely. I started by reading several threads on these forums, and watching John Seltzer's rib cooking videos first, plus a few others. Great info that was quite helpful. The meat and seasonings for this cook came from Costco. I used the "Butt Rub" Costco sells. Then glazed with a sweet BBQ sauce they sell (here in SoCal), for the 5.5 hr cook. I used midwest hardwood lump charcoal, and maybe went through 25% - 33% of one basket, and added 4 decent chunks of applewood for smoking. I rubbed both sides of the pork and then let it sit for an hour while I prepped, lit and heated up the Kamado. In the Kamado I used the on-board temperature gauge, the Slo-Roller, the regular grill on the middle level, and a rib rack to hold the meat. As for cooking temps and vent settings, for at least the last 10 - 15 years I've used a vertical gas smoker as a grill, so I'm used to fiddling with the heat source and top / bottom venting. I filled the lump basket (KJ Classic III) and Looftlighter lit the middle of the charcoal basket. Brought the temp up to 175 degrees and then worked the vents to slow the rise, and stop at 250 degrees. The temp dropped after opening the Kamado and adding the meat. On closing the cover, the temp came back to about 215 degrees, where it stalled, and stuck there while it's liquid steamed off. Once the stall took effect, the vent settings didn't seem to matter too much (too much moisture in the air?). So I worked to adjust the top and bottom vents, one at a time, to bring the airflow through the Kamado to a minimum, during the stall. For this setting, I configured the vent constriction level when the temperature in the Kamado would start to drop lower than 215 degrees. Then I further adjusted (constricted) the bottom vent right to the point where no visible smoke was coming out of that lower vent. This should mean that oxygen was being drawn in and up through the Kamado, making charcoal combustion possible, and smoking the meat. Note that the primary reason I minimized the airflow through the kamado, was to make sure that after the moisture boiled off (the stall was over) that the temperature inside the kamado wouldn't rise too high. John Seltzer had suggested cooking at 250 degrees for low and slow, and that requires decently small vent openings. So after making all the adjustments, I watched for about 2 hours until all the easy to see applewood smoke had disappeared. With the grill continuing to run at 215 degrees, it was time to relax and let it happen. I looked at the temp gauge periodically, but didn't make any more adjustments. After 4.75 hrs, the stall was over and the temp in the Kamado was at 250 degrees. I opened the lid and did a "toothpick" test in several spots. The feel was oh so slightly above easy glide. I pulled off one of the half racks ("for testing purposes only" - as this was my first rib cook), and my wife and I tested each individual rib, just to be sure. Meanwhile, I glazed both sides of the remaining 2.5 racks with the sweet BBQ sauce from Costco. After another 45 minutes on the grill, before we took them off. Awesome. That's the photo you see here. For me, I'm not only into spicy salt. So I'll probably look to mod the Costco Butt Rub a bit. The sweet sauce was fine. Next time I might change the timing a bit. Other than that, I think it went pretty well.
    2 points
  7. Shortyque

    Pork loin

    First, a brief confession. I have had a joetisserie for about a year, and only used it maybe 3 times. Did a chicken, a turkey, for some reason just a little underwhelmed with the whole process, and then all the extra cleaning up. Until today... Had a small pork loin in the freezer from my BIL's pig. Watching John Setzlers video on spinning a pork loin, plus a recent post on the Facebook group made me decide to dig the Joetisserie out again. Injected it with applesauce/apple juice mixture, slathered in mustard and coated with my wife's cajun spice rub. After about an hour and 15 minutes of spinning at 325 degrees, we pulled it off and left rest for 10 minutes. My wife thought I was going to break into tears with my first bite. Words fail me to describe it. The subtle flame kissed outside, the juicy inside, so soft you could cut it with a fork! You can't buy food this good at a restaurant (at least not a restaurant I can afford). Thanks again John for your excellent video.
    1 point
  8. JohnnyAppetizer

    Turkey

    Shelter in place turkey
    1 point
  9. ButchW

    Ol' Timer

    I just recently found this site (Or maybe re-found it) and joined up... I have been using kamados since 1971 (An old Imperial, that I still have).... I bought 2- RJ Kamados (The names I see that you use here) way back when he was in Sacramento... I have a K-9 and a K-3 (Bought for camping)... I later got a "Big Steel Keg to replace the K-3 for camping (The k-3 was to heavy and fragile for travel)... I have a 5th wheel trailer and haul the BSK in the back of the pick-up... I'm getting kinda old to be dragging it along though, So it gets less use... I do a big cook for the 4th Of July, with 35+#s of pork butts cooked over 25+ #s of brisket... The K-9 holds it all just fine... Since retirement my wife enjoys going out to dinner, so we eat out most every night... But with the dreadful Coronavirus running rampant, we are staying home and cooking... Thus something good is coming out of something dreadful... I'm using the Kamado more, and loving it... The k-3 has a stuck spyder, that needs fixing, but the K-9 and BSK are just fine... The Imperial has a cracked lid, but I just can't find it in me to toss it... I'm so familiar with the K-9's cooking habits, that I use it almost exclusively... Sorry for the long-winded introduction..... Oh, I'm in So. CA.... Butch
    1 point
  10. Grill_Boy

    Custom table hole size

    I dumped some stock holdings prior to this recent crash, and along with my Stimulus check I'm going to build out a grill area... pavers, wood beams, slant tin-roof, etc and I want to build out a table to hold (insert into) my Kamado and the Junior... I want spaces to hold my coal and cooking accessories and hooks to hold flippers and tongs... may even go fancy and by some nice tile for the top. The space is going to be 8 foot wide by 7 feet deep. What is the hole size for each that I should shoot for. How much 'back-clearance' should I allow for opening the hood. Full disclosure: I won't be building jack, I'll be holding pieces of wood and hauling stuff while my wife does all the real work, she can design, build, etc better than most and better than I can dream of for sure.
    1 point
  11. Problem - what problem - I don't have a problem. Admitting a problem is the first step to recovery - I have a long ways to go to recovery LOL
    1 point
  12. Somehow that doesn’t surprise me.... Coming from the guy who doesn’t even know when his anniversary is.... (You should have never mentioned that - I am going to remember it and bring it up every chance I get for forever...lol)
    1 point
  13. Those look fantastic! I will be super excited if I can get results more like that.
    1 point
  14. Rec Tec 340 on the side. It is the microwave of grills. My 2017 KJ II prevails. M.
    1 point
  15. I'm a huge fan of my PK Grill.
    1 point
  16. Lamb looked very good. You will get there with the baking of sourdough bread. Here is pictures of my test run this past weekend. These loafs had 15% fresh Ground rye flour, base of other flour was hard white wheat ARW untreated flour.
    1 point
  17. Very nice cook, and I like your marinade and rub. Lemon or orange zest really helps to make roast lamb pop with bright flavor. Rosemary, thyme, and Oregano, are Med staples, and in my humble opinion it is an absolute impossibility to add too much garlic to lamb. When I do shanks I add 18 to 20 cloves to my bean mixture. Garlic and lamb are like PBJ, made to be together. Wonderful cook. A little Spanish smoked paprika is very nice addition to your mix as well. Fine Job, Sir.
    1 point
  18. I have done this cook for years and posted it more than once, so I will skip the detailed description. Basically, fry bacon, pull it, and then sear the flour dredged lamb shanks in the bacon grease. Add 1/2 cup of chicken broth, white beans, carrots, celery, onions, 2 bay leaf, 6 all spice berries studded in the onion, and a tsp of Spanish smoked paprika. Add some dry white wine as necessary during the cook as liquid evaporates. Just putting it on the grill now at 350. Probably goes 2 1/2 hours. Perfect day for it cold and rainy with a prediction of snow tonight. No special occasion, just trying to make the best out of being house bound, as most of the restaurants, pubs, and such we like to go to are closed or take out only. A All prepped and seared just waiting for the grill to hit 350 with clear smoke. Follow along if you're interested. Oh and I forgot to mention also throw in kosher salt, cracked pepper, and about 12 garlic cloves.
    1 point
  19. I know the griddle has been mentioned already a few times, but my blackstone has been a great sidekick to my Big Joe. It's versatile, heats up a bit quicker since it's a gasser and allows for me to prepare my sides outside while the Joe is doing the heavy work.
    1 point
  20. buckleybj

    Lamb on the Joetisserie

    Thank you for the compliments. Haven't had lamb since I was much younger so it was also a chance to see how my palate has matured.
    1 point
  21. My Main grill is my Kamado Joe Classic II with all the fixins except a slo roller, I'm really proud of all my Joe Accessories. But, my side chicks are my Rec Tec Stampede with Competition Cart and Shelf, Weber Performer, and Weber 18.5". My wife says I have a problem, I agree.. I need a Joe Jr. and a big joe
    1 point
  22. ckreef

    Lamb on the Joetisserie

    That is a really tasty looking lamb spin. Glad you put forth the effort to enter it. Great entry.
    1 point
  23. Not real impressed. My husband was already pretty opinionated going into it though. I think it’s just because we are not used to it. It wasn’t that bad - just not our cup of tea I guess. And since it’s so dang expensive, I’m not going to feel too bad about it. I think I would have been better off going with the meatballs or gyro burger type of meals like @ckreef and @JohnnyAppetizer did. Those would have been better “gateway” cooks than my “dive in head first into the deep end” approach with the rack of lamb. Live and learn...
    1 point
  24. I completely agree. I think a lot depends on the TYPE of fire, the temp, etc. etc....though I know not the specifics of what makes it taste good, vs what makes it taste acrid/burnt. There is that "flare up" which seems to spread amazing flavour, and the kind that just tastes bad...
    1 point
  25. Hello, everyone. I am new to the forum and hoped to use this as a resource. Long story, short- I got a great deal on what appears to be an antique Imperial Kamado grill a few months back. Since then, I have put a little money into it with new gasket, thermometer, and a few accessories. The grill was fully in-tact when I purchased with no cracks and it works great. That being said, I've decided to sell for personal reasons. Can someone give me an idea on what something like this is worth? I get the sense that this is a vintage or antique model. I've even seen some similar ones sell on ebay for $1,000. Pictures are below. Thanks so much for your help.
    1 point
  26. Yeah, I always use a drip pan with chicken, turkey, duck, etc. However, your drip pan can easily do double duty and provide you with a flavorful side dish as well. I usually start chicken at 375 and then let the temp climb to 425. Usually takes a little more than an hour depending on the size of the bird. Chicken is pretty much "fool proof" and an easy cook that delivers comfort food flavor. In my book, you haven't really had good chicken until you had it cooked on a Kamado. Hint: if you like crispy skin, let your chicken set uncovered in the fridge for 2 hours or so, after you have spatchcocked it, before your cook.
    1 point
  27. The pictures of the hole were totally unimpressive until the guy stood in it and the walls started going up. It's amazing what is lost in translation from reality to a photo. Nice project!
    1 point
  28. ckreef

    What's your side grill?

    I'm up to 8 or 10 grills depending on how you're counting so I guess that gets me into the collector status ??? Either way with all the choices the Blackstone 3 burner Pro griddle is the most flexible and the best compliment to any other grill. Probably gets used more than any other single grill.
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. dman

    Royal Oak at Wmart

    +1. Hotty Toddy!
    1 point
  31. Shortyque

    Pork loin

    I actually hadn't thought about that. DUH. Will have to try that next time. Hoping to maybe do another spin of something over this coming weekend. I think I may actually start using this more.
    1 point
  32. St1brew

    Pork loin

    Looks awesome, you did an amazing job. Looks like you should take out that Joetisserie more often! I only wish I could've tried it.
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to New York/GMT-05:00
×
×
  • Create New...