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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/16/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi all, I am a wife, mum and an emergency medicine doctor - so life is certainly busy at the moment! I've decided to get a Kamado Joe as a birthday present for my South African husband who loves to braii (BBQ in South African). Like many before me, I am going back and forth between the classic and big Joe (definitely decided on series 3). Reading lots of posts to try and make the decision! Hope everyone is keeping safe and well in these strange times. Best wishes, Zoe
    3 points
  2. OK....If I had known "portable" meant you can use a Ford F-250 to move it around...I may have upped my game from the Weber Q! Well played indeed! I am changing my vote...
    3 points
  3. I kind of love my Akorn Jr. in black. But I’m pretty fond of the new girl in town, PKGO. I’m going to have to go for Akorn Jr because of how tightly and securely she seals up. Because the portability part of a tailgate size grill is pretty important.... If I drop it out on the back deck for a quick winter cook, I have no worries shutting down the vents and bringing it back in. Or throwing it in the back of the suburban and not worrying about it spewing ash everywhere. The PKGO is a little bit of a pig in that it litters ash everywhere - even when the vents are closed a
    3 points
  4. As much as I love charcoal, if I could ONLY have one portable, it would have to be my Weber Q (propane). More often, running into charcoal/fire bans in fire season, and we use it at the lake where charcoal/fires are always prohibited. Also has a nice cast iron insert for smash burgers!! Lastly...I can drunk out and get my wife to cook for me on it...she won't go near the charcoal grill!
    3 points
  5. If you're forcing me to choose it would be the CampChef 2 burner Explorer. 2 burners, griddle, grill box and artisan oven. Basically covers the all bases and the grill box does a decent job even though it's gas.
    2 points
  6. That sounds fab. So important to get them involved in cooking from a young age. My wee one knows his way around our thermomix and helps make batter for waffles every Sunday. We've found the the Opinel petit chef knives great (and in fact I often use choose to use them myself!) along with the Kuhn Rikon kids' knifes for the fun factor. Valuable learning knife skills at a young age and how to properly handle them from a safety perspective.
    1 point
  7. Sounds like a good plan. Kamados really do produce superior results in so many circumstances. A large part of that is the art of cooking in a mostly closed ceramic vessel to get the temperature and humidity and fuel, "the environment" as it were, correct. It's an extremely flexible oven. Once your husband begins to use his Kamado, I know you all will be very pleased with the results.
    1 point
  8. That's useful, thanks. I think perhaps going for the big Joe for increased flexibility, knowing that it will take longer and therefore will be for use at weekends, whilst keeping his current BBQ for quick week night meals (and yes perhaps up adding in a classic or junior in a few years, since our wee boy will obviously need his own to braii with dad )
    1 point
  9. From a Kamado Joe Classic III user, it's been fine size wise. Typically I'm cooking for just the two of us. But I've cooked for 6 with no issues, and could have cooked for 8 simultaneously without any grill space issues. If you get any large Kamado, and by all accounts the Big Joe is a great Kamado, you will always use more charcoal, and it will always take more time to come up to temp (heat soak) than the Classic III. That's just the physics at work. Also, all of the accessories are more expensive. Whatever you decide, you and your husband will be very happy with a quality Kam
    1 point
  10. Welcome @gadgetlover! I tend to lean towards the Big Joe as well. I had both a Big Joe and a Classic sized Vision and found myself always using the Big Joe - for a family of only 4. But I am grilling and not smoking the majority of the time and like the space to do my protein and sides all together. There are lots of people who prefer a classic size though and do way more with it then I seemed to manage when I had one. And then there are the people in the “get two classics” camp - so you can have two very different cooking temps going on at the same time.....
    1 point
  11. That's a dangerous goal - if you include 3rd party stuff, there is a LOT if available kit for KJ. Almost as bad (good?) as Weber for choice
    1 point
  12. Eeek... more choice! Can I ask what the main differences between the Monolith and KJ are? Would the accessories like the Joetisserie and dojoe work on the Monolith (or do they have their own version?). I was planning on buying a bundle with all available accessories as I do love the faff around with gadgetry There will most definitely be vast quantities of steak and boerewors!
    1 point
  13. adm

    Hi, from sunny Scotland!

    Welcome from soft Southern Surrey. I would say get the big one if money is not the issue. You'll never wish for less grilling space, but you may sometimes wish for more. Your husband is South African - so he's probably going to want a LOT of braii space for Boerewors, steaks with Monkey Gland sauce, etc, etc... :-) Also take a look at the Monolith kamados from Germany. They are excellent and have very good local support here in the UK.
    1 point
  14. Keithshoo

    Taking delivery today!

    Thank you, I used your table design as inspiration for mine. I think it came out pretty good
    1 point
  15. Hi everyone. I am taking delivery of a Kamado Joe Classic III today. I am super excited as I have wanted a Kamado style grill for a long time. I was surprised to get a bonus at work this year and took it as a sign to finally buy one. My wife and I started a table build for it last weekend (we enjoy little projects like that together). We just need to fit the shelf for the unit and cut the hole for the top. I wanted the Kamado here, so I can get the measurements right. I previously had a cheap offset smoker that started to rust through in the fire box, so I am not a total strange
    1 point
  16. My second choice is my Jumbo Joe and I also have the SNS for it!
    1 point
  17. I saw one of the larger PK products at a BBQ place locally. The owner was kind of a butt head and hassled me for asking him questions about it. I walked, but not before coming to the conclusion that I liked the quality.
    1 point
  18. I've had numerous Akorn Jr's in the past and a Primo Oval Jr with GO cradle. My latest portable charcoal grill is the PKGO. I also have a 2 burner CampCef with professional griddle. I plan to buy the artisan pizza box for the CampChef in the near future.
    1 point
  19. I am still super pumped with this portable grill. I love it.
    1 point
  20. I second the Akorn Jr. I have made all kinds of great food on this little grill over the few months that I have owned it.
    1 point
  21. Love my Akorn Jr. It goes on fishing trips across Ontario with me regularly.
    1 point
  22. Portable? Only one? Weber Jumbo Joe. Light enough to be easily transported, not going to shatter if (when) I knock it over, tons of accessories for the 18 inch size, and easily modified to suit my needs A portable pellet has a place So does a small Kamado But 18 inches of goodness, with a slow n sear inside.... if I'm stuck with one, that's the one for me
    1 point
  23. BigDBBQ

    Taking delivery today!

    Awesome and congrats! Mine has been a joy learning how to use and expand my cooking horizons/abilities - I hope yours does the same for you! I haven't used a stick burner yet. I have one from the junk that I will use this summer for sure.
    1 point
  24. BigDBBQ

    Meat Probe ...The Meator

    So first con is really just an opinion. Both my Meater+ probes are within a couple degrees of instant read thermo, but your experience may differ. If it's way off just return it. I clean mine with my fingers and a bit of hand soap in my bar sink. If you do it while it's still warm, not hot, it cleans in about 20 seconds. If the black builds up on it, I use my fingernails to clean it. Might take a minute that way. It's no different than cleaning wired probes - except the Meater+ is dishwasher safe! Not sure about the WiFi comment. All meater probes use blueto
    1 point
  25. My personal opinion on this is that it's insignificant difference no matter where you put it. I have tried it a lot of different ways I just can't tell a difference. When it's a low and slow cook at 250-ish degrees, it doesn't matter where the wood is located. It' gonna smolder. The BEST way to produce smoke is to not let it smolder. The BEST result comes form having a wood chunk ignited and burning with a visible flame. That smoke is far cleaner than anything you will ever get from anything that is smoldering, no matter where your smoldering is happening in your firebox. T
    1 point
  26. @taperunner - it actually kind of makes sense now that you mention it to place them inline so once one starts burning, I would think the smoke would just continue on down the line consistently the entire burn, instead of waiting for the coals to catch another one if they are separated. I am going to try that on my brisket run next weekend!
    1 point
  27. I've started doing this on my Kamado Joe. For long cooks I'll try to find 4 or so good sized chunks and place them in a straight line on the bottom basically from the mouth of the bottom vent to the back. Then I put the lump on top. I've been really happy with the results and I'm going to keep doing this. It feels a lot more consistent to me than placing the chunks on top.
    1 point
  28. I do the same as SmallBBQr. I also use a "smoke bomb", placing the smoke wood products into a 8"X2" long stainless steel pipe nipple. Caps on both end, one side has a 1/8" hole drilled thru for the smoke to escape. Makes for a clean smoke aroma & taste on the food (instead of tasting like a forest fire)
    1 point
  29. This is what I have done for many years on my Keg. Produces a cleaner smoke at lower temps on that grill. The fire burns down towards the oxygen source, and then the wood burning at the bottom requires the smoke to go up through the other hot coals and gets "re-burned".... Similar to using a smoke pot with the holes on the bottom. If you go to YouTube and search some of Harry Soo brisket/pork cooks, this is always high on his recommendation list to do.
    1 point
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