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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/05/2021 in all areas

  1. You can’t tell by these photos but this is one of the most beautiful briskets I have ever seen, absolutely beautiful red color. Trimmed all the junk off, rubbed some avocado oil with love and attention and hit it with some rub. Will reside it the fridge for about 10 hours, letting it sit out for an hour or so and in the Joe it goes tonight. I had brisket dreams last night, yeah, I’m that weird.
    2 points
  2. Was on Facebook market place and found this PK 360 for 100.00 and brand new in box grill grates just for this grill! All this for a Benjamin and some elbow grease!! Scott
    2 points
  3. I guess I don't understand these..once I'm dialed in on my temp its stable as all heck. What am I missing?
    2 points
  4. I decided I would drive back when the house sold and pack it up with me then and take it. Ended up fitting in the CR-V without having to take the dome off. Happy to say the move was a success and the KJ is setup in its new home.
    2 points
  5. I’ve been in the restaurant business for 38 years and I just received a KJ I. So far so good. The learning curve doesn’t seem to be too steep. I’ve heard about kamado’s for years but I just figured it was another trendy trinket. After burning thought several grills and smokers there past 10 years, I did some research into a grill that would do it all and be more durable. Lo and behold, these things seem to fit the bill. Here’s to a long lasting and fruitful relationship.
    1 point
  6. I certainly agree with John's comment. My nieces husband is fanatical about this. One touch of red, or even reddish meat juice on his plate and he won't come near it. I always try to buy the best meat I can find, and felt I was simply ruining a good steak. I tried and tried to please him taking his steaks to 160, and having him tell me it was still disgusting and not edible. I took to having him stand by the grill, pulling the steak off when I though it was medium well and cutting a slice and then putting it back on and repeating the process until he would eat it. I would cook a perfect medium rare Prime Rib for the families Christmas dinner and then throw a thick piece in a cast iron pan and try to take it to brown without having it dry out. I usually cook Rib Eyes, but he also had trouble with fat and thought a Rib Eye was a poor quality steak. Try as I might, I just quit cooking steak and any meat other than brisket or ribs for him.
    1 point
  7. My 17 year old daughter has been giving me grief for leaving a “carbon footprint” and my brother has been married to a vegetarian for 30 years and pretty much does the same. Let me tell ya, when the food is pulled, it’s amusing to me how they both forget their overly explained and detailed comments. With their forks and knives scrapping the plates I frequently ask “How many porta potties and restrooms do you see in the fields?” They both know it’s coming. To each there own I guess. I’m happy and content.
    1 point
  8. DerHusker

    Tacos al pastor

    I love Tacos al pastor but have never made them myself. They are a popular street food here in SoCal and Mexico and I finally decided to try my hand at making some. Forgive me as this is a long one. I started out by thawing a Pork Butt I had in the freezer that I had purchased on sale for $.99 a lb. (7.93 lbs.) I unwrapped it and found there was still some ice crystals on it. (which is what I was hoping for to make cutting it easier) I cut it in half and deboned the other half. I proceeded to cut it all up into approximately 3/8” slices. I placed this into a large container, covered it and placed it into the fridge. I now gathered up the ingredients for the al pastor marinade. Here’s the recipe I used. (It’s a combination of several recipes I watched on YouTube) Not shown in the picture are the pineapple juice and the vinegar. 8 lb bone-in pork shoulder (deboned) 4 tablespoons achiote paste (I used 1 – 3.5 oz. brick) 2 guajillo peppers (seeded and re-hydrated) 2 ancho peppers (seeded and re-hydrated) 3 Chipotle peppers + all the adobo sauce from 1 - 7 oz. can 5 garlic cloves ¼ small white or yellow onion 1 oz. Piloncillo (substitute brown sugar if you can find it) 1 tbsp. dried oregano (preferably Mexican) 1 tbsp. cumin 1 tbsp. salt 1 tbsp. pepper 1 tsp. cinnamon (preferably Mexican) 1 tsp, cloves ½ cup pineapple juice ½ cup white vinegar ¼ cup OO ¼ cup of the water from re-hydrating the peppers ¼ cup orange juice ¼ cup lime juice 1 pineapple, skinned and sliced into 1-inch (2 cm) rounds (for the spit/trompo) (Note: I only had some small guajillo chiles so I used 6 of them) Everybody went into the pool for a spin. I poured some marinade into the bottom of a very large bowl and then some pork slices. I repeated this process until all the pork was in the bowl and pour the rest of the marinade over the top. I then stirred it until everything had a nice coating. Now how will I cook this? Tacos al pastor is a dish developed in central Mexico that is based on shawarma spit grilled meat brought by Lebanese immigrants. It is traditionally cooked on a vertical spit known as a trompo. I don’t have such an exotic grill, so I had to improvise. I had found this indoor grill plate at a local thrift store for $2.17 and used it to create a vertical spit. I now peeled and sliced up the pineapple And started my vertical trompo stack adding a slice of pineapple and red onion after every 6 or 7 layers of meat. I place the stack in the center of my weber redhead with coals all around it. I then setup my craving station. Here it is after approximately 30 minutes. After approximately 75 minutes I removed the trompo and craved off the outer charred layer. (The char is an important part of the taste profile) I then placed the trompo back in the redhead to char the outside again. So pretty! I then repeated the process another 3 times. After I had trimmed off the outside 3 times I set up my taco cart errrr bar and started to assemble my street taco plate. Oh Yum! Here it is served up with a Modelo Especial. This was a little on the spicy side but oh so delicious! Thanks for looking.
    1 point
  9. len440

    Be honest y’all.

    I think i was fortunate that my mom and dad liked med rare steaks. I still remember when my Dad apologized for giving me an undercooked steak (Rare). It was love at first bite.
    1 point
  10. Combustication

    The search is on!!

    I just moved from Ohio to Texas and bought a bag of B&B and the pieces were massive. I'm wondering if its produced closer to where I am now so the chunks don't break during shipping or if I just got lucky. I had bought some when I lived in Ohio as well but those bags were nothing like the jackpot I hit with this one.
    1 point
  11. Well it took a while but I finally got my money recovered from my bank debit card. I was sure I would never see the cash. Woo Hoo!
    1 point
  12. daninpd

    Be honest y’all.

    My wife was a vegetarian when I met her and when she moved in with me she would make herself a salad for dinner and eat it without me. When I got home I would cook as usual. Over about 6 months she got to where she would wait for me to get home and cook and eat what I cooked. Obviously the vegetarian thing went away if she was eating what I cooked. She was raised by a Mom (like mine) that cooked everything to death and thought well done was the only way for any meat. I wouldn't cook anything past medium (pink and warm in the middle) and she went through the whole process of discovery that @CentralTexBBQ described that more cooked=more tough when it comes to steaks; she has been converted. She also learned from some dishes cooked by world class chefs at some food and wine events that some cuts of meat are meant to be served barely cooked or raw or air dried. I never said anything, but I considered those salads she ate before I got home from work to be rude.
    1 point
  13. I just got a Goldens also. I bought the grill without cart and built my own. Have only done a first burn and a couple seasoning burns and 1 steak cook. I am going to really enjoy this cooker.
    1 point
  14. Polar Bear

    Posters

    The Weber wasnt popular on release due to its high price point and most people who were interested moved on as soon as the RRP was revealed It kind of missed its window to wow existing Kamado owners looking to upgrade I'm sure Weber wouldnt have dropped the price if it was selling well You're also fighting the issue that people either A- think a kamado at that price point should be ceramic, because... reasons? B- say "thats a lot of money for a big kettle" Weber really missed the mark when the Summit launched in terms of marketing and any momentum they may have had with the product evaporated long ago That having been said, between the recent price drop of the Weber and the price rise of the Series 3 KJ, the Weber is looking like a no brainer (at least in Australia, where I'm based) I'll likely ditch my BJ2 in the next 2 or 3 years and when I go shopping for a new grill, the Weber will be top of my list
    1 point
  15. ckreef

    Konro Addi(c)tion

    Been really busy so I haven't been around much lately and even less time to grill out. Both the Konro and PKGO can cook identical skewers. There are a few things that I think make the Konro more suitable. On my Konro I don't use the wire screens so my skewers are suspended in the air. I prefer it this way. I suppose one could setup something similar in the PKGO but most people probably just put their skewers on the Grates. The long thin design also makes it easier for 4-6 people to sit around the grill and cook their own skewers. My current home and work life has changed significantly. Because of that my Konro has been packed back into it's original box and stored in a closet so nothing happens to it until a future time. Meanwhile my PKGO is stored in the 5th wheel and gets used a few times per month when we go camping. Two completely different grills that can cook the same thing but really have different uses (if that made any sense). Besides one more grill never hurt anybody unless of course your wife hurt you for buying yet another grill (a distinct possibility at my house - LOL) @gotzero congratulations on the new Konro. A great looking grill.
    1 point
  16. @baileybbq i love corn on the kamado. My mouth is watering looking at your photos… Here in Ontario fresh(ish) corn (from Florida IIRC) is currently going for a dollar a cob or more right now in packs of 5 cobs. I think I am going to have to soften my stance one of these days.
    1 point
  17. My wife is not a steak eater so, she has had it maybe once or twice in 35 years of marriage. Around our 25th, I took her to the best steak place in town and she had a well done boneless ribeye to my medium bone in. A qulity ribeye "can" still be fairly tender at well done- I found. Anyway, she must have been counting her 15+ chews per bite versus my 5. So, halfway through the meal, she huffed, threw her fork and knife down in disgust and asked for a bite of mine. Next came "why is my steak so tough and yours so tender?" After a little explanation, she asked for another piece of mine after which I had to steer her back to her steak. A man's steak is not for sharing.
    1 point
  18. Unfortunately, I'm in the same boat as Henry and John. Just makes it difficult to coordinate so they both come off the grill close to the same time. But I persevere because I've had her for closing in on 50 years and probably will continue because nobody In their right mind would want me now.
    1 point
  19. I used to have that problem and told her learn to like rare steak or hit the bricks. I still have the dog who is completely happy eating rare steak. I think I came out on top here.
    1 point
  20. philpom

    Be honest y’all.

    I'm glad Mrs philpom and the philpom kids all like it rare. In my opinion you don't know what steak tastes like if you don't enjoy it rare. Nothing like that juicy tender flavor. That said, if I know I'm going to be cooking for someone that likes it well done I'll grab some cheap steaks for them. I'm not going to ruin a fine steak and they won't likely know the difference.
    1 point
  21. K_sqrd

    Be honest y’all.

    Fortunately, my wife and I as well as our family, enjoy rare to medium rare steaks and chops. If it's not moving or mooing, it's fair game. LOL! We had some family visit recently and I offered to cook steaks. One guest asked for "well done". My wife opined that she didn't think I know how to do "well done". I did my best and the guest was happy with the result. Guess I lucked out.
    1 point
  22. My wife requires her steaks to be well done also. It has made me a better cook learning how to do it properly. A good medium rare steak is easy. A good well done steak is hard.
    1 point
  23. For years I lit my Weber kettles with my propane torch like that. Then my last Weber kettle that burnt out on me had a propane igniter built in, so I removed it and made a bracket that would slide into the bottom vent and sit right under the charcoal basket of both Joe's. 60 seconds, remove and set the vents and wait for the desired temp. I like to repurpose things if possible.
    1 point
  24. gotzero

    Konro Addi(c)tion

    @ckreef was the one responsible for my initial purchase. I think of it like a kamado vs a Weber kettle. The bricks get hot over time and radiate a lot of heat. When we are done I usually put the charcoal in a closed kamado and the konro can remain hot for hours. I have a PKGO, I suppose it would be easy enough to do a side by side cook on each and watch temp and time. These days I am looking for any excuse to cook outside.
    1 point
  25. @lotosmoke You have hit upon a 'problem' that I have been working on recently. It's not easy to get good crispy wings on a kamado. However, I have done my best wings to date recently and they are excellent. Step 1: Dry the chicken wings thoroughly. I do this with clean dry paper towels. Step 2: Give them a VERY THIN glaze of oil. Step 3: Toss them in a seasoned flour. You can use your old bay to season the flour if you wish. Step 4: Put the wings on a kamado that is preheated to 425-450°F. This takes 30-ish minutes to cook these. The difference is mostly in the airflow. The kamado isn't moving as much air as the kettle. If you have a pellet grill option, that will work even better. Here's a photo of the most recent batch I did on the Pellet Joe by the same method I described here: That is as crispy as it gets. You can create a higher airflow situation in your kamado by a few methods that just take a little practice. Use a LOT LESS charcoal and keep your top and bottom vents fully open. The actual temperature for this cook is not as critical as having MORE AIRFLOW. People who have air fryers are doing wings that look like this at 375°F. That lower temperature works because there is a TON more air movement in an air fryer. I am gonna pin this post to the top of the forum... thanks for asking!
    1 point
  26. Just did my initial seasoning today. Will have my first cook tomorrow. Standby.
    1 point
  27. Regardless of who moves it, I recommend it be taken down to as many pieces as possible and securely wrap them individually. I had to move a Junior, a Classic and a Big Joe about 45 miles when we moved a couple years ago. Myself and my wife took all the guts out of all the grills and wrapped them. We took the grills out of the stands and put good, thick cardboard between the lid and the base. Then we placed the grills on foam insulation and used additional foam insulation to pad the sides. It was really scary just the two of us trying to lift the grills out of and then back into the bases.
    1 point
  28. psych

    Tacos al pastor

    I'm a little over a year and a half late to this post, but I found it a few days ago after deciding to try some different things on the Joe besides my typical fare. We were missing this meal after a local place we used to eat at closed down (presumably due to COVID) and I hadn't realized it was something I could do at home. We followed the instructions pretty much to the letter aside from doing it on the Joetisserie. All in all it was phenomenal and well worth the effort. I would definitely try to find a boneless pork shoulder since my butchering skills leave something to be desired. I also need to work on getting more char. After I trimmed off the first layer I never seemed to get more and as it was mostly already cooked I was afraid of leaving it on for too much longer in case it dried out. I could probably toss it in a pan afterwards and do a quick fry for a few minutes? Either way, excellent meal that certainly impressed my wife and our guest with not nearly as much work as expected. Half the time was just spent trying to butcher that damn shoulder. I just found a Gyro recipe here also, so moving onto that this weekend! Thanks to all those that continue to share their recipes.
    1 point
  29. It’s that time of year when the questions start flowing asking for advice on making that perfect prime rib for a Christmas feast. I would like to take a few minutes to share my ideas and experiences with you on this amazing hunk of beef and how to cook it. My FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT piece of advice on a cook like this is to AVOID doing experimental or first-time modifications to your process if you are cooking for an important meal. My second piece of advice is that the prime rib cook is an EASY one, so do not sweat it! Buying your Prime Rib Roast: Buy your prime rib roast at least a week before you are planning to cook it. You are going to want to start prepping the meat one to two days before the cook. How much do I need? I would suggest budgeting for a bare minimum of ½ pound per person. I always like to go with ¾ pound per person. If I have 1 pound per person, I’m not upset in any way either. There is nothing wrong with having leftover prime rib, especially if you have a vacuum sealer. Prime, Choice, or Select? If prime is not a financial burden, then do it. You cannot go wrong there. I will also say that I have never bought a choice grade prime rib roast that I was dissatisfied with in any way. Angus beef usually falls into the choice category, but I have had some that looks as good as any prime roast I have purchased. I would avoid select grade. Grass fed vs Grain fed? This one is a personal preference. I am not a fan of grass-fed beef for many reasons that mostly concern the flavor of the beef. Some of the best beef I have ever had has been grass fed and grain finished. The grain in the diet is a major contributor to the intramuscular fat marbling that most of us want in a great cut of beef. Most of the grass-fed beef I have bought in the past is mostly devoid of that marbling. Bone in or boneless? Most of us are fans of the bone-in concept with it comes to big fat ribeye steaks and prime rib roasts. I am not going to recommend one or the other but I am going to tell you that I prefer boneless when it comes to prime rib. The only value I see in the bone is for presentation purposes. If you need or want an interesting presentation, then go with the bone. The reason I prefer boneless is because I find that the meat cooks more evenly. The bone is shielding the meat from the heat. It extends the overall cooking time by some small amount. I would also rather have a more even browning on the outside of my roast. Prepping your Prime Rib Roast: The most important prep procedure on any prime rib roast is salting. This is a big cut of meat and it can handle plenty of salt. I like to salt mine 24 to 48 hours prior to cooking time. This gives the salt a lot of time to work its way into the heart of the roast. Most of us will be using a rub or seasoning blend on our prime rib roasts, which is fine. I just recommend putting it on early. Season the meat adequately and then wrap it up tightly in plastic wrap and toss it back in the fridge until you are ready to cook. As a rule of thumb, a roast like this can easily handle 1 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat. Cut that in half if you are using regular table salt. Be aware that most seasoning blends are less than 50% salt. Since salt is an important flavor enhancer in this cook, we do not want to come up short when adding it. My preference for seasoning a prime rib roast is keeping it simple and flavorful. I would recommend using one of your favorite salt/pepper/garlic based seasoning blends. I suggest avoiding seasonings that include herbs if your cooking technique is going to involve any searing. More on that later. I also like to truss my roast tightly with butcher’s twine to help it hold a nice round shape as much as possible. This is optional but it’s my preference. Cooking Techniques: There are a lot of ways to cook a prime rib and we all have our favorites. Choose whichever method you prefer but keep two goals in mind. First, we do not want to overcook the meat. Secondly, we do not want to scorch the outside of it either. Yes. It is true. Scorching is not the same as caramelizing. Target Temperatures: 125°F - Rare 135°F - Medium Rare 145°F - Medium 155°F - Medium Well 165°F - Well Done Low and Slow: This is my preferred method. I like to set my grill up for indirect heat at 250°F with a light smoke. I will typically use a single chunk of cherry. I set the meat in the center of the grill, insert a temperature probe into the center from one end of the roast, and I will let it cook slowly until my internal temperature reaches 125°F. When it hits this mark, I take it off, wrap it in foil, and let it rest for 20-30 minutes before slicing it. I will get anywhere from 7 to 10 degrees of carryover cooking on a typical roast cooked this way. It lands perfectly in my medium rare range close to 135°F. When I slice into this roast, I have a perfectly even pinkness from edge to edge. It is a perfect cook. This method takes 2.5 hours, give or take 20 minutes on average. This is also independent of the size of the roast. These roasts all take about the same amount of time to cook because of their shape. The only thing that makes one roast bigger than another is the length. Sear, then Low and Slow: This is another method that I like, but I just do not do it very often. IF you prefer a more seared exterior on your roast, take it out of the fridge when you are ready to cook and toss it in the freezer for about 30 minutes with the plastic wrap still on the meat. Preheat your oven (or another grill) to 500°F while this roast is in the freezer. After the oven has had 30 minutes to preheat, place your roast on a rack in a pan and set it in the hot oven for about 15 minutes to lightly brown the outside of the meat. When you are happy with the browning, take it out and transfer it to your grill and follow the low and slow instructions above to finish the cook. This method produces a great result. Reverse Sear: The reverse sear technique involves following the Low and Slow instructions posted above and then searing the outside of the meat after the initial cook. This is challenging to do properly and to do well on a roast like this. Once the roast has been cooked via the low and slow method and has had a chance to rest, you can sear the outside of it by a couple different techniques. You can sear over direct flames on your grill, you can sear it on preheated cast iron such as a griddle, pan, or Dutch oven, or you can use a flame device such as a torch to put a final sear on the meat. Whichever method you choose here, be CAREFUL not to scorch the meat. The meat is already cooked, and it does not take much to take it too far at this stage. Rotisserie: The rotisserie is another method preferred by many to cook a prime rib roast. With a rotisserie I still try to keep my ambient grill temperature between 250-300°F. The rotisserie method cooks the outside of the meat a little more, so you get that caramelization during the cook rather than adding it before or after the cook. The rotisserie also provides a few extra challenges during the cook. You must be careful about grease dripping onto your fire. It can cause flare ups that can scorch the outside of your meat if you are not careful. I recommend working through a few prime rib roast cooks and some other rotisserie cooks before you do your first prime rib roast on the rotisserie. If you want to make an amazing horseradish dipping sauce for your prime rib, please feel free to try my recipe: 1 cup prepared horseradish (or freshly minced with micro plane grater) 1 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tsp kosher salt ¼ tsp black pepper 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce Dash of hot sauce (optional) Combine these ingredients well and refrigerate until ready to use. Make a day in advance if possible. So now you are armed with everything you need for a successful prime rib feast! John Setzler #AtlantaGrillBlog #PrimeRib101 Here's the video from my December 2020 Prime Rib Cook:
    1 point
  30. This is mostly my personal opinion however some of it is based in science. Top vent controls volume out <----- Bottom vent controls volume in <--- this is the science part. ^^^^^together they control the air velocity through the cooker and over the fire. Top vent open a bunch and bottom vent open a little creates a cleaner fire Bottom vent open a bunch and top vent open a little creates a more smoky fire I personally work them together, I have a setting on top for each setting on the bottom. That is just what works for me. There are obviously many different ways to look at it and apparently folks are having success using different methods.
    1 point
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