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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/11/2021 in all areas

  1. len440

    Kudos to Kamado Joe!

    The larger dial may be for us senior citizens. Glad KJ took care of you
    3 points
  2. That cap you made is actually pretty darn creative, it will probably work quite well if you don't get too much wind along with the rain. To answer your question, I have cooked in light to medium rain without a cap with out much problem. Heavy persistent rains, like we get here during monsoon season, are a different story. Since I have a couple of rain caps. If I think there is a chance of rain, I use one. I have both a Smokeware and the BGE Regulator with the rain attachment, along with my original Daisy wheel. My favorite of the three is the Regulator. I love that cap and use it exclusively as my go to cap rain, snow, or shine. I can really dial in temps well and the cap is easy to clean. Another plus for the regulator is that with the rain attachment, it can be used to keep your coffee warm on an early morning cook (see pic). I keep thinking I should toss the other two, because, now days, they just take up space in my grill drawer.
    2 points
  3. I did a preliminary test run on making small scale batch for recipe I designed for sourdough baguette with 10% whole rye flour for only 2 baguettes. I will be doing larger batch for 4 baguettes to be ready for my official taste tasters to be ready for Saturday morning. I weigh out 320g per baguette before shaping etc, My shaping has improved significantly from last year, but I still see room for improvement in regards to shaping and scoring. The crust was nice and crisp, crumb very good, this baguette recipe tastes very good.
    1 point
  4. I built two rain caps for my Akorn before I got my Joe. The first one was a tomato can with the bowl from a chicken stand on top (below bottom), then I took a piece of leftover wire fencing and rigged it to provide cover (below top). The latter option worked much better because it provided better circulation.
    1 point
  5. I have never had any issues with rain when I'm grilling. I haven't done a pork shoulder, but I've done some cooks where I've been cooking for 3 or 4 hours. I just set my grill where I can stay dry without the grill being under my awning. Here are a couple of pictures of my grill being used in the rain. This is when I was bringing the grill up to temperature.
    1 point
  6. This is very crude but should do the job.
    1 point
  7. A.O.

    Kudos to Kamado Joe!

    So I bought a Kamado Joe Classic I a few weeks ago and turns out the thermometer was reading WAY low, about 130-140 ish degrees at a full boil, I did my best to adjust it but could get no closer than about 190 degrees. Sent an email to Kamado Joe and they sent me a new thermometer without a hassle. Just got it yesterday, did the boil test with it today and it was spot on so I now have a good accurate thermometer on my new toy! AND the one they sent me was a new bigger deluxe one (new one on left in pic) thanks Kamado Joe!
    1 point
  8. A.O.

    Kudos to Kamado Joe!

    Well I do fit into that crowd, thanks for reminding me!! Now I'm going to go jump on the Harley and feel younger.... maybe!
    1 point
  9. I too started with the 18" KJ classic, it was a good size for most cooks, but get a large group together and and you realize the limitations. I also have an Akorn Jr. which I bought on clearance for $50 at Wal-Mart, great for tailgating and has become my hot dog and brat grill. In the last couple of years I have had family move close by, so I decided it was time to upgrade to something bigger, and after researching for almost a year, I decided on a 32" Komodo Kamado. So the answer for me is it's not a one size fits all scenario, like Mike said, it all depends on your situation.
    1 point
  10. Join in on tonight's livestream if you are bored and have nothing else to do... 730pm ET!
    1 point
  11. I wish I could remember what grade it was. I will mention that I probed the meat with my instant-read thermometer in different areas and it slipped in and out easily. The first slice passed the "floppy" test and did pull apart easily. Lack of inter-muscular fat was probably the culprit. I appreciate everyone's responses. Thank you.
    1 point
  12. It sounds like a bad/unlucky cut. You want to use USDA or Canada prime whenever you can. Choice (US) AAA in Canada can be hit or miss on some cuts. Applying a 50/50 mix of salt & pepper 24 hours before the cook can help the cut retain more moisture. Adding an injection on AAA/choice cuts 24 hours before the cook can help with moisture.
    1 point
  13. What grade of brisket was it...scanned the thread but did not see if you mentioned prime, choice etc? If it was a low grade brisket with no intermuscular fat, it could easily explain it as well. Surface fat on a brisket mostly runs off and does not saturate the meat to a great extent.
    1 point
  14. no one ever convinces me to remove the fat!!! My Memorial Day brisket was a 50% offer, though still a certified angus. It was perfect. I’ve never cooked anything below that quality. And take this with a grain of salt but, add a probe test to your arsenal before pulling. I’ve probed tender on a brisket as low as 192°; others at 207°. I pull them then (if I am going to hold them over an extended period, I pull them a little early as they continue to “cook” when holding).
    1 point
  15. You could have just got unlucky with the piece of meat!
    1 point
  16. My first trip to NC was an eye opener. Everywhere we went for beakfast the bacon was- well, rare to say the least. My bacon doesn't have to be extra crispy but it does have to be cooked.
    1 point
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