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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/10/2021 in all areas

  1. dman

    Football and fish?

    Why not! Fresh halibut, skin on, and fresh crab cakes. On the Classic at 350. Sautéed some garlic in butter and drizzled over the fish. Crab cakes on my half moon griddle with butter infused EVOO then topped with the rest of the garlic butter mixture. Delicious!
    1 point
  2. KCrossland

    Hello from NH

    Hello! Newbie to Kamado cooking and I’m here to learn as much as I can. I just went all in on the KJC3 and it will be here in a few weeks. Accessories such as the Joetisserie have already started arriving. When my husband and I were first married, we were gifted a brand new gas grill and while we have enjoyed using it over the years, the food that comes off it is never “wow”. I purchased an inexpensive electric smoker recently and we tried things like a smoked meatloaf, chicken, ribs, shrimp etc in it and have really enjoyed it all, the flavors are just so much better. My internet searches on smoking meat led me to read about the BGE and then to read about Kamado Joe. After about a week of debating which direction to go and watching as many videos, reading as much as I could on Reddit and here, I decided to go with KJ. I was going to purchase from local Ace Hardware for the delivery and set up, but they only had the Classic 2 in stock and I really wanted the Classic 3 so I ordered online. I broke it to my husband afterwards but he didn’t seem to be upset I’m looking forward to learning as much as possible here!
    1 point
  3. jark87

    Rubs not sold on Amazon

    While this is an older thread, it’s still a good one! You can’t go wrong with Meathead’s Memphis Dust. If giving as a gift, get a nice shaker jar and make up a batch. How’s that for artisanal? It takes about 10 minutes. I add a little jalapeño powder to kick up the heat a bit. https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/spice-rubs-and-pastes/meatheads-memphis-dust-rub-recipe/ As far as commercial rubs go, my current favorite is Lane’s Scorpion rub. Available on Amazon. I also agree on the Killer Hogs rubs. Good stuff!
    1 point
  4. BOOMER SOONER... What a game!! And Alabama goes down!! NHL is good, go BLACKHAWKS!
    1 point
  5. Give up 330 yards on the ground? Kentucky is good, but - ouch! Oh well, there's always the Saints. Or the Jags. Anyone for Southeastern? Or maybe give up football and wait for NHL to begin? I think I'll take the last option.
    1 point
  6. I like my whisky like I like my meat. Smoky!
    1 point
  7. Keith Hecker. I'm looking forward to seeing some Sicilian inspired cooks on the Monolith.
    1 point
  8. I tried something a little different today...i made some biegnets. These were almos perfect. Imwill try it again and get it absolutely perfect...
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Henry B 3

    Biegnets

    I used to make these years ago, one of the benefits of growing up in Louisiana.
    1 point
  11. A little late response, had a couple of hand surgeries. 1. prep meat a couple of hours before, then the Joe 2. Start it up, using star looking separator placed in the middle tier 3. Stone and grill on each side, with temp up around 500, using thermogun. And that's pretty much it, thermopen tells me when its time to pull 'em. I don't bother setting on grill side as intended as its more of a safety issue as I don't want them to fall into fire. Did that flipping some fish. But they have that beautiful char I want. I have found more char-middle, less char-top. I just have not found any benefit to using higher temps other than burning myself quicker and I have had plenty of those.
    1 point
  12. I've worked as a butcher for nearly 15 years and the boning knives we use at work cost ~£10 each (about ~$13 I guess) from a catering supplier. They're not any particularly high grade steel, but they take a good edge easily (though need to be honed and re-sharpened on a regular basis). As other people have already said it's important to keep the knife sharp. We have to replace them every six months or so as the blade profile wears down. They also have to be sturdy enough to go through a commercial dishwasher (it's the easiest way to meet food hygiene requirements, though not something I'd ever do with one of my own knives at home.) The handle is as important as the blade. You need to make sure it's comfortable in your grip. One of the things I look for in a boning knife is decently grippy handle with a substantial bolster to stop your hand accidentally sliding down on the blade. (When you're working on a joint for any length of time out of refrigeration, contact with the fat can make your grip greasy and slick.)
    1 point
  13. I like my boning knife for trimming fat off cuts (including brisket), but unlike many folks, I have a preference for cheap-a$$ knives (I purchase for $2 - $5 at the local thrift store) and then I put razor edges on them using my sharpener (Ken Onion edition Work Sharp). That said, I regularly find great quality knives (I sharpen and give/sell most away to family, friends, and other contacts). Often see Henckel, Chicago Cutlery, and even Victorinox. People toss out everything! I still only need to maybe sharpen most once a year at best except my heavily used chef knife (my daily cutter).
    1 point
  14. Ben S

    Biegnets

    I think we all need to meet in NOLA and compare Johns to the real deal.
    1 point
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