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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/13/2022 in all areas

  1. The soapstone has found a new home. Will be shipping it out soon. Thanks again @KismetKamado, it was a great help.
    4 points
  2. Thanks for everyone who replied. I've been thinking about this a lot and i think I've landed at my decision - for 2022 at least. I'm leaning towards not getting a KJ, it's better than my existing Akorn but not enough to justify picking up the extra bbq and I can probably improve my Akorn cooking skills to offset some of the disadvantages. The SloRoller seems to be mostly marketing and while it does seem to do something, producing consistently better food doesn't seem to be there based on most of the reviews. The KK is amazing and something that will remain on my bucket list but I'll probably also defer that for now as it is a significant sum of money for a piece of art that will churn out similar quality food. I still really want one but I'm going to use my head... for now. I'm going to take some of that money that i'd set aside and pick up a dedicated pizza oven (i'm not comfortable getting the Akorn that hot), grill gun/su-v gun (if I can get it imported in to Australia) for searing my sous vide cooking and also for easy and quick starting of the Akorn. I'll then look at either grabbing a mid range second hand offset or a cheaper drum smoker just to give me something a little different to the kamado I already own. They won't look as good in my backyard but they will give me flexibility and different cooking options. I'll continue to work on improving my cooking and trying to cook more and more on the grill before looking at the KK again
    2 points
  3. I just picked one up yesterday at the Princeton, NJ, Costco--999.00 with an instant $100 manufacturer rebate, so out the door at 899+tax. KJ Classic II. I was in the store last weekend and they had about a dozen, but did not have pricing. On-line on Sat. morning, they reported being sold out. Glad I went in to check--the rebate was only good yesterday through the 19th, but already stock was down to 4. So, going fast, even without the rebate.
    2 points
  4. 2 points
  5. @Smokingdadbbq has a video on a double indirect method and I believe he does the opposite - SloRoller on top of heat deflectors. I don’t know that it matters - just an observation. But in regards to your coals being burned up, using a double indirect method will require more fuel to reach your temp because you have 2 sets of deflectors blocking the heat. In the aforementioned video, that was the intent - hotter cleaner fire while still protecting the food. Sounds as if you had your food on before stabilizing your KJ. I’ve found that getting the grill stabilized and vents set prior to putting on the food is the most effective way to cook on the KJ. That includes letting the dome get heat soaked at your desired temperature. For example, I’ll slowly start shutting vents down when I’m about 50° from my target. Once I hit the target and have my vents set, I’ll still wait at least 10 minutes before putting the meat on just to make sure I’m truly holding that temp. And I’ll hand test the dome to make sure it’s plenty hot. As someone else stated above, I also form a “well” in the center of my charcoal and place the fire starter in the well, usually at the bottom of the charcoal basket. Once lit, I’ll place pieces of charcoal over the fire, making sure to leave plenty of space for oxygen. I leave the lid and bottom vent open and when there’s about a softball sized amount of charcoal glowing orange, I’ll stir it all up to spread the fire out evenly. I then close the lid, but swing the control tower (top vent) wide open, while also leaving the bottom vent open. I’ll slowly start closing vents down as I start to near my temp. I don’t add wood until the fire is going strong and I wait until the wood is burning cleanly before putting the meat on. In regards to shutting down, I just close top and bottom vents tightly. I leave unused charcoal in the basket for the next cook. I’ll clean everything out every 2-3 cooks. I don’t have a shop vac, so I do the opposite - I use a leaf blower and blow in the bottom vent. I’ll remove the charcoal basket and push all ash out by hand before doing that. I’ve only had to do a high heat burn off once or twice. Hope all this helps! Welcome to the forum!
    1 point
  6. fajitas (skirt steak). opportunity to use new soapstone. btw, KK was kind enough to let me cut my teeth on a broken soapstone while I decided to buy one. I've cooked on either half and both combined– ribeyes, tomahawk's, pork chops, bacon, asparagus, fajita, etc. My children bought one for me so, if anyone is interested, contact me and I'll send it to you.
    1 point
  7. fotoflux

    Reef's Lump Comparison

    Even the expensive stuff sparks…. Look at this Fogo Super Premium leave ash everywhere…
    1 point
  8. Now a days that's not saying much!! And that's a shame!
    1 point
  9. AJS390

    Reef's Lump Comparison

    I finally ran out of my previous charcoal and gave this masterbuilt charcoal a try. It was well worth the price. Large, hard lump and seemed to burn fine (I ran the grill for over 8 hours cooking some ribs). Not sure how much is left in the basket since I haven't looked, but it didn't give any sign it was running out of fuel. It did seem very mild in smoke profile, not a lot there from the charcoal itself. But that's not necessarily a bad thing, just need to make sure you've got your smoking wood ready. The only real negative I could find is that it did seem to pop and throw sparks more than others when lighting. But that's not a real concern for me either. My main takeaway is that, if the price remains the same, I don't see how there's a better deal out there.
    1 point
  10. Gebo

    Have Any of You Tried This?

    Oftentimes I end up "charring" the bottom of my meats. I tried this yesterday with my Boston Butt at 275-300 and was well pleased. I had wasted money on a DoJoe (I now have an Ooni) and had it just hanging under my steps. I decided to take the pizza stone out of the DoJoe and install it above my KJ ceramic rings. Sort of give me and double indirect indirect. Hey, bottom didn't burn or char. The shoulder didn't even stick to the grates after cooking for 8 hours. Hey, I'm sure someone has thought of this before me. I just haven't seen it done. I'm sold on it.
    1 point
  11. len440

    Hmmmm, an experiment..

    Good choice of meat. I do chuck roasts quite often. Some one called them poor mans brisket. Yours looks very tasty. Left overs make good stew. or tacos. I see your in SC so I guess your corn is local. We still have a wait for ours. Lucky you.
    1 point
  12. While the Classic 3 has more depth, and you can fit a grill or other surface below the Joetisserie, that's not so easy with the Classic 1 or 2. Just too close to the spit, if you're spinning a fryer chicken, or something of that cross-sectional area. So, to see if it was worth doing, I got a 17 inch Weber grill (chromed), because it was fairly inexpensive, and didn't need fabrication. Cut it in half, and used the half that didn't have the center bar. And that was enough to get clearance for the 5 lb yardbird that was the main course today. It was a bit tight, so I'll probably trim off 1 more bar, but it works. The slightly smaller original size, plus the missing center bar, helped. I also flipped it, so bars were at bottom, for that little bit extra clearance. Had some potatoes in the foil, along with the chicken. Next time, I'll use a narrow basket or foil boat for them, but just experimenting here. Once this grill grate rusts (both halfs), I'll try to get something a bit slicker fabricated, but for now, this works to expand a bit of what I can do while using the Joetisserie. Total cost for two little grates - under $20.
    1 point
  13. Nice job! Love the creativity!
    1 point
  14. just4fn

    Pork tenderloins x2

    So, I cooked them separately and used different rub on each and brushed with a honey/garlic/soy sauce glaze. They came out really good. They only took about 20 minutes to cook at 375. I pulled them at 138 degrees and they were perfect. I could see doing them tied together with something in the middle like cheese, bacon, or something to make it special.
    1 point
  15. Thanks, John! I just set up my new KJ Classic II today, and used your book for tonight's spatchcock chicken. A coal basket is on order! Appreciate what you've done here--just what I was looking for.
    1 point
  16. A.O.

    Hmmmm, an experiment..

    Outfreakingstanding!! This turned out great, I may never cook a chuck roast any other way again! It did cook out the marinade flavor but that was ok.
    1 point
  17. Most hams are already cooked so you just wanna season/glaze the outside of it and take the internal temp no further than about 125-130f.
    1 point
  18. I love that this soapstone is getting passed around.... hope it finds a great home next.
    1 point
  19. We used to have Potluck Lunches at work about 6 times a year. One year our lunch fell on November 11th, Remembrance Day. We decided to ask everyone to get creative and bring foods that reflected wartime options for people. I did Panko coated, Fried Spam on a stick, served with a couple of dipping sauces. I did a little display showing Spam’s origin as a canned wartime food for soldiers as well. It was a great hit and was gone in no time. A lot of the younger kids turned their nose up initially and had to be talked into trying it. Some older people remembered having as kids. Only one or two still eat it regularly. All enjoyed it.
    1 point
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