Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/07/2021 in all areas

  1. adm

    Roast Beef for Christmas

    Here in the UK, turkey is the traditional Christmas lunch, but I like Roast Beef instead! I got a rather nice 3Kg (6.6lb) rib roast from my butcher. I believe you lot over the pond would call it prime rib. This is expensive here, so it's a bit of a luxury, but then again it is Christmas. I salted it well with sea salt 48 hours before to give the salt time to draw moisture out of the meat and then reabsorb it back in. Then a little more salt and pepper prior to cooking it. It went on the Kamado at 110C (230F) and took about 4 hours to reach 49.5C (121F) at which point I pulled it and left it to rest under some foil for about 90 minutes. Perfect temperature control using the Fireboard 2. Once I pulled it, the internal temperature rose to a maximum of 56.7C (134F) to end up between rare and medium rare. Then I let the Kamado gain temperature until it hit around 425C (800F) and then gave the meat 8 minutes to sear it off. Served of course with the traditional British accompaniment of Yorkshire Puddings, roast potatoes, horseradish and the rest of the trimmings... Damn, it was good! And we still have enough left for roast beef sandwiches later today. Happy belated Christmas everyone!
    13 points
  2. Gebo

    Other Kamado Forums

    This ain’t gonna be what you think it is. It’s Thursday morning and I just wanna give a shout out to the men who oversee this forum. I thought I would venture to a BGE forum just for a little more learning. I am a Preacher but not a prude. I like to have fun and will have some cough medicine when I ain’t coughing. Maybe some ale for my ailments. I watched Yellowstone. In other words, I am familiar with most human natures from the good to the bad. Well, let me tell you, it didn’t take me but a few days to delete myself from that BGE forum. I have never witnessed the degree of vulgarity exhibited there. It turned my stomach. I even had a member here from this forum PM me warning me of the wickedness of some of the posters. Wow, was he right! So, what’s your point? We have great overseers on this forum. I want to thank them for their hard work in managing discussions and keeping things civil. This is a great forum a 15 yr old could come learn from. This is a forum I can recommend to others. Thanks, John and the others. Wel, I guess I said enough.
    13 points
  3. jtemple

    My First Tomahawk

    seasoned with Kinder's "The Blend" (salt, pepper & garlic powder) 250 indirect with bourbon barrel chunks until the steak was about 122 degrees internal seared on soapstone at 600 This was the best steak I have made by a long shot.
    11 points
  4. I'll probably get in trouble for this. Oh, well.
    11 points
  5. CentralTexBBQ

    A Parting Shot (2)

    Sunday dinner yesterday ~7lb ribeye. Smoked 4 hours @200° then pulled to rest while au gratin potatoes and massive asparagus occupied the grill. Grill temp climbed to 475°ish. after sides were done, seared to finish.
    10 points
  6. Due to personal circumstances.. Christmas dinner came early for me and mine.. Did a 12 lb turkey here yesterday.. a balmy -15 Celsius. Brined the bird for 18 hrs prior to adding some Country head all purpose seasoning and my own mixture of poultry spices including dry thyme / dry sage and some good coarse pepper. Stuffed the bird with some onions and then put on my Kamado at 400-450 degrees F for 2 and 1/2 hours.. pulled at 165 on the drumstick.. topped with some coconut herbed scalloped potatoes and breaded parmeson roasted cauliflower florets.. .. a nice stuffing and gravy made with drippings for the cook ended it all well.. Merry Christmas to all. Tonight -30 Celsius.. glad the cook got done early.. lol
    10 points
  7. 39-day dry aged choice angus beef.... 4.8lb cut from the center of the roast... dry brined in the fridge overnight with Atlanta Grill Company's Man Cave Meals AP Mojo... 525 degrees for 15 minutes... another 1:45 or so at 250 degrees to finish it off... let it rest for 15 minutes..... This was the best tasting prime rib I think I have ever had. I think I can improve this process a little by tweaking my 'dry brine' process just a little. They dry aged beef doesn't dry brine as well because of the reduced moisture content. Next time, if there is a next time, I am going to rub the outside of the beef with Worcestershire sauce and salt and then vacuum seal it for a semi wet brine overnight before the cook. Anyway... that's all I have for today Added Video:
    10 points
  8. Off. No way. Went straight in my belly! Thought Id splurge on a 1kg black angus cattlemans for my birthday. Was so worth it. Kept it simple, a rub of salt, pepper and garlic. On the kj at about 180c. Was on for about 30 minutes before I pulled it off for resting. Was 56c IT. Then opened up the vents while it rested. Seared for a couple of minutes either side. Served it up with a homemade bernaise sauce, crispy potatoes and a rocket salad.
    10 points
  9. Thanks. I almost forgot to take that photo. I did forget to post this one though.
    10 points
  10. Hello friends, I' m i newbie on this forum. Let me introdece myself. Two days ago I have became a proud owner of Kamado Joe 3. I have a family of my tree Weber kettles and I hope to increase my cooks. I live in the Czech republic, Central Europe, I'm grilling about 30 years, 2015 I have started interesting about L&S. I like amarican BBQ, asian cousine and czech grilling as well. I'm a bluegrass musicin too, playing guitar and mandolin. Husky
    9 points
  11. It’s my cake Day! As Jerry Garcia once sang: “What a long, strange trip it’s been…” For me however, it’s been 10 years of getting up at the crack of stupid, then sitting on the patio swing or laying on the futon with my fearless dog (Sophie, long since passed), enjoying the early morning sounds of a distant train or the church clock peeling away the hour. And maybe chatting with the neighbourhood cats, skunks, o’possums or raccoons. Sometimes greeting a daughter as she would come home from a night out, sharing the swing for a few minutes and solving over the troubles of the day before she heads off to bed. Hearing the thump of the morning paper land on the driveway and the delivery guy motoring away. It’s been 10 years of looking up at that night sky and wondering: “where’s that plane headed at this time of the night, there’s Orion or I wonder when the ISS will be passing over?” Yes there are apps for that and I use them all as I sit in the quiet darkness and dream of past and future adventures to foreign lands whilst I enjoy the aroma of hardwood smoke. 10 years of neighbours sticking their head around the corner of my garage to see what I am cooking today and perhaps sneak a taste. It’s been 10 years of looking for deals at the market, buying quality charcoal, finding local oak, maple and fruitwoods for smoking materials. It’s also been maintaining the freezer inventory, the careful prepping of meats to be placed onto the Akorn, of being thankful for the animals that have given their lives for our sustenance and pleasure. It’s seeing the look in my wife’s eye as I tell her I will be getting up at 03:00 and that I need to be in bed by 22:00 tonight… she knows. It’s been 10 years of inviting friends and family to join us at the table for simple yet good food, drink, stories and laughter. 10 years of occasionally delivering a big platter of Pulled Pork, buns, toppings and sauces to friends who are mourning whilst knowing that food can say more than words in those times. 10 years of compliments on my skills (even when I don’t feel that I have been successful). As the TV Chef always says: “Tutti a tavola a mangera”, everyone come to my table and eat! On May 24th it will be 10 years of my being a member of the Kamado Guru site. It’s been a big part of my life and I thank John for his foresight and work in being “The Guru”. I thank the many of you that have contributed your experiences, commented on my cooks, chatted directly or simply made me laugh over this time. It’s all brought me great joy. I hope for many more happy years with you. I am proud to be associated with The Kamado Guru in my little way. My final comment about all of this is that I often think that a lot of us on this website have taken some of the joy out of our Kamado hobby. As the world goes more high tech on a daily basis, our hobby has also become (unnecessarily) more high tech what with all of the controllers, pellet feed hoppers, vortex thingies and the like. I still use my simple original Akorn Kamado, Smokin’ Stone diverter, tongs and a thermometer - that’s all. Oh, and my patio swing from which to watch the early morning sky. Meat, heat, spice and time. Life can be pretty good. I appreciate you taking a moment to read this. Here are a few images from over the years.
    9 points
  12. adm

    Another Kamado Paella

    All my kids are at home today, the weather was pretty decent, so why not do a Paella on the Kamado? Answer: no reason not to. Let's get going! First off, fry off some chicken thigh in olive oil Remove that, then fry off some onion Add some pepper Some garlic Some grated tomato and some smoked paprika. Plus some good salt and pepper. Congratulations. Your sofrito is now done Add back the chicken and some beans Now add chicken stock, infused with saffron and white wine. And of course the Bomba Rice Close the dome for 15 minutes then add your seafood, give it another 10 minutes and.... A fresh green salad and some crusty bread. Heaven...
    9 points
  13. keeperovdeflame

    Board Sauce

    If you have been here awhile you have probably seen this, If you new or haven't caught a post which describes it, my thought is that it will add another tool to your backyard chef's tool box. The use of what he calls a Board Sauce was described by Adam Perry Lang in his book "Serious BBQ". The technique is extremely simple but also very effective in adding yet another layer of flavor to what ever your taking off your grill grate. In this post I used a board sauce with a prime rib eye. The technique: As your ending your cook, prepare your cutting board to receive and slice what you have cooked. Start by adding a healthy drizzle of good olive oil to the surface of your cutting board. The next step is to sprinkle the oil with what ever rub, herbs or spices you used during your cook. When you place what you have cooked on the cutting board move it around a bit to spread out the oil and herbs. As you slice and plate, use some short tongs to completely dredge each slice in the flavored oil. Personally I use a board sauce with just about anything I pre slice before serving. Steak, Brisket, Pork, Chicken, etc. Give it a try, I am thinking your will enjoy the results.
    9 points
  14. I am stuffed!!! Got it on the Kamado along with an onion in foil About 40 minutes at 275 then took it off at a temp of 117 for sear time on my new little Weber classic. Rested it for about 10 ish minutes waiting for the grill to get up to temp. Finished product, sorry I didn't get any pics of the taters on the KJ, I did them on the extend a grill above the steak in a cast iron pan and when I took the steak of I opened up the KJ and put a crisp on them. And time to eat!! Very yummy!!
    9 points
  15. Cooked this chicken to test out the brine recipe before using on the Thanksgiving turkey. It turned out great! Brine consisted of buttermilk, bourbon infused syrup, salt, garlic powder and onion powder. Brined for about 20 hours. Sprinkled bird with a little Lanes Scorpion Steak and R Butts R Smokin Cherry Habanero seasoning and smoked with a medium piece of cherry wood for about 90 minutes at 350°. Had a nice crispy skin, which is usually elusive for me. I’m planning to use the chicken in salsa verde chicken enchiladas, but I devoured a leg and thigh after the resting period….
    9 points
  16. Cooked a 2-in thick New York strip on my Weber Summit kamado. Reverse seared. Just salt pepper garlic for the seasoning. I haven't used just salt pepper and garlic in quite a while. Mesquite wood. At 122° internal temperature I moved the steak to the center of the great so it was just above the charcoal baskets... the steak was cooking about an inch and a half above the lump. Dome temperature was still fairly low. But the steak was right above that fire :). All it needed was about 3 minutes over the lump and it was ready to serve. I have the divide and conquer on my vision kamado. This Weber kamado is 2-zone too and I did find it easier to use to go from indirect to direct right away. Since the charcoal grate is adjustable.
    9 points
  17. Semper fi Brothers and sisters Happy Birthday
    9 points
  18. Oh man did this turn out great, started out at 350 degrees and worked up to about 450 to finish.. bird was perfect from center to skin! Served with that wonderfull gravy and some home made applesauce!
    9 points
  19. New Orleans has a dish called barbeque shrimp, that's not done on a barbeque, but in a.sauce pan. Different restaurants have different versions of it, and it can vary widely. Check it out at Deany's in the French Quarter for a really good version. I like it, but it's messy to eat (shrimp are served head-on, shell-on in the best places. And, it's spicier than my family likes. So for Labor Day, I did a grilled shrimp that borrows from the New Orleans recipe, but isn't. And it can be done on a grill (Kamado in this case). I've simplified the list of ingredients and processes from the original concepts (no wine, no reduction, fewer spices), but this is definitely a dish to make your own way. I wanted to be sure that the fresh shrimp flavor came through, which is easy to lose (for me, at least) with too much spice heat. Some spices bring that out, though, so bay leaf and lemon juice are kept here. Fresh shrimp is a huge benefit, if you can get them. Well-taken-care-of frozen shrimp will also work ok, but not all frozen are well-taken-care-of. I wouldn't try this with low quality shrimp, just wouldn't be worth the effort. Ingredients 1 lb whole, fresh shrimp (see below) per person Worcestershire sauce Lemon juice Butter Olive or other mild cooking oil Bay leaf Salt Minced garlic I didn't measure much of anything in this cook, pretty much done by eye and taste. But it's pretty straightforward, and flexible. 1 pound whole shrimp is equivalent to ⅔ pound of peeled. So adjust to the appetites you're feeding. Also consider shrimp salad or a grilled shrimp poboy as leftovers, so a bit extra don't hurt. Head, peel, and de-vein the shrimp; put the heads and peelings in a stock pot with about 1 pint water per pound of whole shrimp. Add salt (other spices you like, Louisiana Shrimp Boil, Tony Cacherie's, Old Bay,etc., or at least a couple bay leaves), and boil about 10 minutes, stirring frequently. If you use one of the premixed spice blends, check to see if they include salt. Don't want to over salt! The water is not enough to submerge all the shrimp peels, stirring helps get it all cooked, and all the goodies extracted from the heads and peels. (You can make a larger quantity of stock, for this I want it pretty dense). Using 2 bowls, add some ice to the larger, pour a small amount of the stock into the smaller bowl (sitting in the larger). Let it chill. You want it cold, not warm, so you're not warming the shrimp. Add enough Worcestershire sauce to make it look like dirty water, medium dark brown. About ¼ to ⅓ of the volume of stock (yes, that's a lot). Add the shrimp to the mixture, let it soak at least 10 minutes, up to half an hour or so. The longer you go, though, the vinegar in the Worcestershire sauce will begin to denature the proteins (think ceviche, but vinegar instead of citrus). You can see some of that going on in the thinnest parts of the shrimp in the second pic. In this photo, I've made up too much marinade, which is a waste of good shrimp stock (liquid gold). Worcestershire sauce is a primary flavor in the classic dish, and the classic style has the shrimp cooked in a reduction of that, wine, and stock in a skillet. In this version, it's being used as a marinade, so not as strong a contributor. But again, trying to let the fresh shrimp shine through. The baste here is a combination of butter, oil, bay leaf and salt, warmed until the.butter sizzles, then add minced garlic and.remove from heat. Add lemon juice. Reserve some for dipping at the table, or pouring over the skewers then. The rest is used as a baste before putting on the grill, and supplementing that initial baste while it cooks. Skewer the shrimp, baste, cook to 130F minimum. Kamado in the 350-375F range, grill in upper position. Once the shrimp go on, it's an open-dome cook, turning the shrimp every couple minutes and moving them around to get an even cook along the skewers and between them. In this example, I ran final temp for the shrimp higher, around 155, as that's the preference of my consumers, but there's a trade-off in texture and flavor. Had a side of an eggplant with this, and some potato salad (not shown). Eggplant was just rubbed with oil, salted, and a little of Simon and Garfunkel rub from Amazing ribs.com. Started the eggplant a bit before the shrimp - they're pretty quick. It's a nice, quick cook with delish leftovers (including the extra shrimp stock - did I say I like that stuff?). Suggestioms for leftovers: grilled shrimp po-boy, shrimp salad....
    8 points
  20. I've done this cook about 20 times now on the Joe Jr. and I think I've gotten it down to a predictably delicious and visually appealing plate. Two 9-10 oz. Chilean Sea Bass steaks, about 1 1/4" thick, skin on, rubbed with EVOO and sprinkled on all sides but the bottom with smoked paprika. The EVOO and the paprika create a semi-crisp crust and good color. Kept cold until placed skin side down on the Jr. at 425* and cooked without turning to an IT of 110*. The cold fish takes longer to reach 110* IT, thus giving the surface more time to develop crust and color. As discussed in an earlier post of this cook, 110* IT produces a silky, tender center. If you prefer fish cooked to a higher IT, follow your preference. Glazed in the final minutes on the grill with pineapple-habanero, plated, and then sauced with the remaining glaze. Garnished with sweet & spicy red cherry peppers julienne and finely chopped cilantro. I would serve this dish to Jacques Pepin. Or Ina Garten without the cilantro, which she dislikes. Thanks for Looking and Happy Cooking.
    8 points
  21. 2:1 for on wings at the local grocery emporium last week. They darn near jumped into the trolly on their own as I walked by at that price, right!!!! 48 hr dry rub brine. 325 over open fire in Big Red with a handful of apple chips in the ash tray. Coat well with orange chipotle bbq. Bump the temp up a bit to set the sauce. Add crispy cheese fries and house bread and butter pickles. Cheers all.
    8 points
  22. I have been approached by a company who wishes to buy this website and take it over. After a lot of soul searching and thinking about a very profitable offer from them, I have decided to keep it and keep it up and running myself. I will continue to pay the bills myself. However... If you wish to help support the costs of running this site, please read the following ENTIRELY: You may send a PayPal contribution to me at the john@setzler.net email address. You can send me contributions via Venmo to @JohnSetzler. Contributions of $25 or more will get you listed here as a Lifetime Supporter and you will be able to browse the site ad free. When you send a contribution of $25 or more, you MUST tell me your username here on this site so I can upgrade your account level. Thanks again for your support! John Setzler
    8 points
  23. Well if these are random pics, here is a pic of a table I completed yesterday. I started by cutting the trees down to do this..
    8 points
  24. MossyMO

    Hot ‘n fast ribs…

    Done in about an hour and the butter pecan flavor was excellent on them!
    8 points
  25. Don’t know if this has been posted previously but here goes.
    8 points
  26. And then there's when a BLT goes totally wrong.
    8 points
  27. philpom

    Fun with Dutch ovens

    We spent a few weeks in the mountains at our cabin in December last year. One of the funnest parts of going up there is the cooking and the food. For some odd reason after a day of splitting wood and stacking it, dragging railroad ties around for landscaping or taking down a block fire pit to move it and rebuild it.... Every meal is the best you ever had.  everything was cooked like so. It's a fun and relaxing way to do it and offers a great level of control. Breakfast pizza We tossed everything including the kitchen sink in this. Chorizo, bacon, breakfast sausage. Cheese. Olives, eggs etc.. I will admit to using wack o can of dough. Chuck roast It was cold, getting down near single digits and this was perfect for it. Standard stuff, carrots, onion, potatoes, herbs and beef broth. It's also nice cooking this way since we heat with wood the wood stove is a great place to keep food warm or even reheat it.
    8 points
  28. The cool days of winter are perfect for cold smoking cheese. Every year at this time I smoke a big batch of cheddar. It will be well aged by the time I give them as gifts for next Christmas. I start a small pile of lump in a grill that is not used for the cheese. Once it's going well I place about 3 smaller pieces on HD foil and cover with a large handful of chips. Then wrap it up so it resembles a Hershey kiss with a small opening at the top. Lay that in the bottom of the grill for the cheese. Place the rack in, open the vents and place the cheese in. You should have a steady wisp of smoke but not massive billows. I usually leave the cheese in for 10 to 15 minutes. I found hickory to pair very well with sharp cheddar. I like to use herbs and spices on the cheese before I vaccum seal it for aging. This year I did 3 varieties and I can't wait to try them. Black pepper is a regular and this year I tried crushed red pepper and caraway seed as an experiment. This was 5 pounds of tillamook sharp cheddar. Finished caraway seed. Crushed red pepper. Black pepper. Don't miss the chance this winter and try it!
    8 points
  29. This little guy showed up on one of my hummer feeders. During summer we go through 3 quarts of sugar water a day (10 lbs of sugar a week), so we have hundreds of hummingbirds a year. I have never seen a white one like this.
    8 points
  30. dh14ster

    Nothing beats steak...

    Simple is good. Ribeyes from the local Harris-Teeter, Montreal Steak Seasoning, reverse sear using the CI griddle. Always a hit!
    8 points
  31. Three large boneless, skinless chicken breasts pounded to about 3/4” uniform thickness. Marinated 4 hours in olive oil, minced garlic, Italian seasoning, red pepper flakes and S&P. First layer is a generous studding of soft goat cheese. Second layer is yellow onion in fine dice and sweet & spicy red cherry peppers in 1/2” dice. Third layer is baby spinach wilted for 2 minutes in the microwave with Tuscan herb-infused EVOO. Fourth layer is shredded mozzarella drizzled with the same infused EVOO. Roasted indirect @400* until juices run clear and the mozzarella is golden brown. Pulled and drizzled with the same infused EVOO and rested for 5 minutes. Simply plated with asparagus in lemon oil. Thanks for Looking and Happy Cooking.
    7 points
  32. Caught them Threw them on live and waited till they stopped moving and change color. Ambient temp was 500f. Popped them and made Lobster Benedict. In the islands they throw them directly on the coals. I used the low grate. As always fresh goosters (nickname for spiny lobster) were MMMMM good.
    7 points
  33. We brined this piece of pork loin for 24 hours in a basic salt brine. It made a huge difference in the final result. I cooked it at about 300°f with hickory and towards the end it was given multiple coats of peach BBQ sauce Mrs philpom made from our 2021 harvest. Pulled at an internal temp of 142°f. It was exceptionally tender and moist. Thanks for looking, brine one, I'm certain you'll enjoy!
    7 points
  34. To be honest Mrs philpom called me the other day from WinCo to tell me she found ground beef on sale, I asked her to get me a pack. She brought home 4 pounds of 93/7 ground beef. I debated for a week what to do with it but the day came and the date was near, it forced my hand. Meat loaf it was but I wanted something different (I love to experiment). I blended this up with: Beef crystals Beef Coffee rub granulated garlic Course chopped red onion Course chopped celery Course chopped yellow, red, and orange sweet peppers Fire roasted green chilis Crumbled dried old corn bread 2 eggs Then I pressed it well in to a small roaster pan, brushed the top with Worcestershire sauce and dusted with granulated garlic, chili powder, black pepper and kosher salt. Tossed it on the smoker at 275 along with some hickory chunks for about 2 hours. Pulled it, let it rest and sliced it. Kinda reminded me of slicing up a brisket flat. Well, hot dog! It turned out better than I hoped, no sweet sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce or the like here.... meaty and savory delish with the crunch on peppers/onions/celery to complete the bite. A lightly sweetened table sauce would be nice drizzled at serving time. I also enjoyed this form factor better than a traditional meat loaf. Delish!
    7 points
  35. I don’t think I’ll ever use my Joetisserie for chicken again. Spatchcock is too easy and chicken turns out darn near perfect every time. I didn’t fuss with my favorite buttermilk brine - just an overnight dry brine along with the last of my Lane’s Scorpion rub and almost the last of my R Butts R Smokin Cherry Habanero rub. I have just enough remaining of each to try and recreate them on my own.
    7 points
  36. fotoflux

    Smoked some chicken

    Went a little crazy with the temperature probes It was interesting to watch the temps, but I ended up pulling it when the slowest cooking breast reached 160. Thighs made it to the high 170's. It was super moist and made a delicious pulled chicken sandwich. I would've shown the final product, but I got too hungry and forgot. I've been going on a kick roughly following instructions from the Meathead book and used his Simon and Garfunkel chicken rub. Lots of green herbs, added a nice flavor through ought the chicken...
    7 points
  37. fotoflux

    Smoked some chicken

    This time I grilled some chicken! Tandoori-style. Marinated for a couple hours before cooking. I can’t believe how easy it is to cook on a Kamado. I followed a recipe and seared the chicken over direct heat and then baked it on the indirect side.
    7 points
  38. Here's another smaller one I bought that I cooked for dinner last night...
    7 points
  39. Our new outdoor kitchen was finished last week and included a very nice Blaze natural gas grill for convenient cooking. My daughter and son-in-law have been with us from South Korea for the past 6 weeks and we were sending them off with a nice steak dinner. Found some wonderful 8 oz. prime filets at a nearby butcher and I dry brined them for a few hours and hit them with Lane’s Scorpion Steak seasoning. As I prepared the gasser for offset cooking, I just couldn’t bring myself to use it for those nice steaks. I quickly fired up the KJ and slow cooked the steaks at 250° with a nice sized chunk of pecan. Enjoyed a couple of margaritas over the next 45 minutes or so while my wife made a wonderful kale cole slaw based on a Chick-fil-a recipe. Once the steaks hit 120°-125°, I moved them over to the gasser’s infrared burner for a quick sear, so it wasn’t totally left out of the picture. The sear burner actually did a great job and I didn’t have to disassemble the SloRoller and wait while my KJ got up to searing temperature. Dinner was superb!
    7 points
  40. Starting off traditionally. A pot of black eyed peas and sausage simmering for three hours while the cabbage is smoking on the grill and the ham is baking. Here’s hoping 2022 is better than the last two years! Now I have to make the hard choice before heading for my recliner and the football games!
    7 points
  41. This big boy showed up outside my great room window, while I was in my chair watching the Army Navy game ("Beat Army"). In the West we call him an 11 point buck. 5 on one side, 4 on the other, and two eye guards. He had about 10 girlfriends with him. ]]]
    7 points
  42. Mrs philpom pulled together our first successful home batch of Tempeh, Black Bean Tempeh instead of soy. It was done in the instant pot on the low yogurt setting and took 48 hours for the mold to mature and bond the beans in to a sturdy loaf. Next up was to slice and pasteurize it with steam. Then it was ready to marinate in a mixture of lime juice, soy sauce, EVO, chili powder, oregano, garlic, groud cloves and adobo sauce for a few hours. This was then grilled on a medium hot grill (~350f) for about 6 minutes total. The tacos were served on homemade flatbread and garnished with red onion, radishes and cilantro all from the garden. The flat bread was flour, salt, baking powder and yogurt cooked in a hot dry skillet. Now here is where it get's crazy (as if eating molded black beans instead of meat isn't weird enough). We have one of those fresh food delivery services and on our last delivery they included - without us asking - some vegan fermented pepper jack "cheese" shreds. Those of you that know me, I am full carnivore but we have open minds when it comes to food so for the full effect we topped our tacos with some of these "cheese" shreds. Overall it was a tasty meal and we will continue to experiment with tempeh for the protein rich variety it offers for our diet. I encourage everyone to step outside the box and try new things!
    7 points
  43. dh14ster

    Doctor's Orders

    Doc: At your age, you would benefit from a Mediterranean diet. Me: Mediterranean, eh? Greece is Aegean, Ionian, but technically Mediterranean. Okay, Doc, I got this, but will need some help. I enlisted my daughter to help. Upon my request, she made saffron rice, which was great, but not as great as her lemon rice pilaf, which kills it. Greek salad, of course, with the last of our garden tomatoes and peppers of the season. And on the Joe, Himalayan salt block lemon and Greek seasoned grilled swordfish. Complemented by a Sauvignon Blanc from Bordeaux. Definitely some of the best swordfish ever. Thanks, Nik!
    7 points
  44. JeffieBoy

    A quiet Sunday morning

    Was up before dawn and craving some flesh, so I loaded up the Akorn with some Big Block, Maple and Apple chunks and got her lit. I pulled out a 5 pound Pork Shoulder roast, coated it, injected about 2 ounces of Apple Juice and let it rest until we were up to temp. Made Tea for Two and settled in to a recorded episode of Vera (Brit Murder Mystery). Meat went on and it looks like we know what’s for dinner tonight! No mystery there. My wife loves waking up to the smell of the Akorn going. I love being outside at sunrise with the temps sitting just above feezing.
    7 points
  45. When I moved back from Germany to Virginia in August of 2020, I knew I wanted to build a new grilling space (Grillplatz in German) in the back yard of our new home. I started out getting unpacked and it wasn't much. Next, had to get a fence to contain the animals and the outdoor furniture that was beginning to arrive from overseas. Score! Got a great deal on a slightly used (4x) Kamado Joe . At least one member on this forum busted on me about my hardstand lol Next, gotta get some overhead cover to protect the equipment and the cook! Okay, so now we are going to do something about the hardstand, because I had plenty of mud when I was in the Army hahaha. The crew excavated and my daughter, her boyfriend, my buddy, and I did the pavers. Turned out pretty good if I do say so myself. Some of these pictures are sideways, don't know what I can do about that. So first meal looks a little crowded but that's because we have 7 people eating at a 4 person table. A low sitting wall and fire pit are going on the other side after I build a table for the Joe and possibly a small bar. We are getting there. And, I am really enjoying the views from my kitchen. I hope you enjoyed this.
    7 points
  46. dman

    Football and fish?

    Why not! Fresh halibut, skin on, and fresh crab cakes. On the Classic at 350. Sautéed some garlic in butter and drizzled over the fish. Crab cakes on my half moon griddle with butter infused EVOO then topped with the rest of the garlic butter mixture. Delicious!
    7 points
  47. My favorite time of year, crisp morning air, turning leaves, college football, and an excuse to cook comfort food. One of my favorite autumn cooks is a simple spatchcock chicken over a pan of veggies. Today it is windy and cold and it has been in the 30's at night and early morning. The leaves on my maple tree are a bright red and I feel like cooking. Love the Autumn colors Cleaned the Egg the morning Picked up a growler of Fest Bier at a local brewery built on the site of an old trailer park, called the lazy G. Going to cook about 4, drink a beer, enjoy the change of season, and smell the wonderful aroma coming out of my Egg I will post a few pics of my cook.
    7 points
This leaderboard is set to New York/GMT-04:00
×
×
  • Create New...