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  1. It's actually 9 courses but I combined a couple courses so it's served as a 7 course meal. It was supposed to be 10 courses but in the middle of all this I forgot to cook one of the courses - oops by that time I was 1/2 a bottle of Prosecco down and well that's my excuse and I'm sticking with it - LOL. I used this guide for a full course Italian meal: https://toscanaslc.com/blog/guide-to-the-traditional-italian-meal-structure/ Here’s all my ingredients pictures. Aperitivo Antipasti Primi Secondi Contorni - the forgotten course Insalata and Formaggie Frutta combined Dolce and Caffe combined Digestivo Here are a few "action" pictures And dinner is served........ Aperitivo - chilled Prosecco with Cranberry Cheese (Mrs skreef made me do it). Antipasti - tomato crostini drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and 18 year aged balsamic vinegar. Primi - Cheese tortellini drizzled with Alfredo sauce. Secondi - XL (7 Oz.) Meatball served in sauce. Insalata and Formaggie Frutta combined - Spring mix leafy greens with feta cheese and fresh blueberries served with a blueberry balsamic vinaigrette. Dolce and Caffe combined - Savoiardi (lady fingers) stuffed with orange flavored Italian sweet cheese and dipped in dark chocolate. With a side of espresso and some Canadian sugar in the raw. Digestivo - finally Limoncello served in frosted glasses to wash it all down. I am officially stuffed - LOL -
    18 points
  2. It’s that time of year when the questions start flowing asking for advice on making that perfect prime rib for a Christmas feast. I would like to take a few minutes to share my ideas and experiences with you on this amazing hunk of beef and how to cook it. My FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT piece of advice on a cook like this is to AVOID doing experimental or first-time modifications to your process if you are cooking for an important meal. My second piece of advice is that the prime rib cook is an EASY one, so do not sweat it! Buying your Prime Rib Roast: Buy your prime rib roast at least a week before you are planning to cook it. You are going to want to start prepping the meat one to two days before the cook. How much do I need? I would suggest budgeting for a bare minimum of ½ pound per person. I always like to go with ¾ pound per person. If I have 1 pound per person, I’m not upset in any way either. There is nothing wrong with having leftover prime rib, especially if you have a vacuum sealer. Prime, Choice, or Select? If prime is not a financial burden, then do it. You cannot go wrong there. I will also say that I have never bought a choice grade prime rib roast that I was dissatisfied with in any way. Angus beef usually falls into the choice category, but I have had some that looks as good as any prime roast I have purchased. I would avoid select grade. Grass fed vs Grain fed? This one is a personal preference. I am not a fan of grass-fed beef for many reasons that mostly concern the flavor of the beef. Some of the best beef I have ever had has been grass fed and grain finished. The grain in the diet is a major contributor to the intramuscular fat marbling that most of us want in a great cut of beef. Most of the grass-fed beef I have bought in the past is mostly devoid of that marbling. Bone in or boneless? Most of us are fans of the bone-in concept with it comes to big fat ribeye steaks and prime rib roasts. I am not going to recommend one or the other but I am going to tell you that I prefer boneless when it comes to prime rib. The only value I see in the bone is for presentation purposes. If you need or want an interesting presentation, then go with the bone. The reason I prefer boneless is because I find that the meat cooks more evenly. The bone is shielding the meat from the heat. It extends the overall cooking time by some small amount. I would also rather have a more even browning on the outside of my roast. Prepping your Prime Rib Roast: The most important prep procedure on any prime rib roast is salting. This is a big cut of meat and it can handle plenty of salt. I like to salt mine 24 to 48 hours prior to cooking time. This gives the salt a lot of time to work its way into the heart of the roast. Most of us will be using a rub or seasoning blend on our prime rib roasts, which is fine. I just recommend putting it on early. Season the meat adequately and then wrap it up tightly in plastic wrap and toss it back in the fridge until you are ready to cook. As a rule of thumb, a roast like this can easily handle 1 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat. Cut that in half if you are using regular table salt. Be aware that most seasoning blends are less than 50% salt. Since salt is an important flavor enhancer in this cook, we do not want to come up short when adding it. My preference for seasoning a prime rib roast is keeping it simple and flavorful. I would recommend using one of your favorite salt/pepper/garlic based seasoning blends. I suggest avoiding seasonings that include herbs if your cooking technique is going to involve any searing. More on that later. I also like to truss my roast tightly with butcher’s twine to help it hold a nice round shape as much as possible. This is optional but it’s my preference. Cooking Techniques: There are a lot of ways to cook a prime rib and we all have our favorites. Choose whichever method you prefer but keep two goals in mind. First, we do not want to overcook the meat. Secondly, we do not want to scorch the outside of it either. Yes. It is true. Scorching is not the same as caramelizing. Target Temperatures: 125°F - Rare 135°F - Medium Rare 145°F - Medium 155°F - Medium Well 165°F - Well Done Low and Slow: This is my preferred method. I like to set my grill up for indirect heat at 250°F with a light smoke. I will typically use a single chunk of cherry. I set the meat in the center of the grill, insert a temperature probe into the center from one end of the roast, and I will let it cook slowly until my internal temperature reaches 125°F. When it hits this mark, I take it off, wrap it in foil, and let it rest for 20-30 minutes before slicing it. I will get anywhere from 7 to 10 degrees of carryover cooking on a typical roast cooked this way. It lands perfectly in my medium rare range close to 135°F. When I slice into this roast, I have a perfectly even pinkness from edge to edge. It is a perfect cook. This method takes 2.5 hours, give or take 20 minutes on average. This is also independent of the size of the roast. These roasts all take about the same amount of time to cook because of their shape. The only thing that makes one roast bigger than another is the length. Sear, then Low and Slow: This is another method that I like, but I just do not do it very often. IF you prefer a more seared exterior on your roast, take it out of the fridge when you are ready to cook and toss it in the freezer for about 30 minutes with the plastic wrap still on the meat. Preheat your oven (or another grill) to 500°F while this roast is in the freezer. After the oven has had 30 minutes to preheat, place your roast on a rack in a pan and set it in the hot oven for about 15 minutes to lightly brown the outside of the meat. When you are happy with the browning, take it out and transfer it to your grill and follow the low and slow instructions above to finish the cook. This method produces a great result. Reverse Sear: The reverse sear technique involves following the Low and Slow instructions posted above and then searing the outside of the meat after the initial cook. This is challenging to do properly and to do well on a roast like this. Once the roast has been cooked via the low and slow method and has had a chance to rest, you can sear the outside of it by a couple different techniques. You can sear over direct flames on your grill, you can sear it on preheated cast iron such as a griddle, pan, or Dutch oven, or you can use a flame device such as a torch to put a final sear on the meat. Whichever method you choose here, be CAREFUL not to scorch the meat. The meat is already cooked, and it does not take much to take it too far at this stage. Rotisserie: The rotisserie is another method preferred by many to cook a prime rib roast. With a rotisserie I still try to keep my ambient grill temperature between 250-300°F. The rotisserie method cooks the outside of the meat a little more, so you get that caramelization during the cook rather than adding it before or after the cook. The rotisserie also provides a few extra challenges during the cook. You must be careful about grease dripping onto your fire. It can cause flare ups that can scorch the outside of your meat if you are not careful. I recommend working through a few prime rib roast cooks and some other rotisserie cooks before you do your first prime rib roast on the rotisserie. If you want to make an amazing horseradish dipping sauce for your prime rib, please feel free to try my recipe: 1 cup prepared horseradish (or freshly minced with micro plane grater) 1 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tsp kosher salt ¼ tsp black pepper 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce Dash of hot sauce (optional) Combine these ingredients well and refrigerate until ready to use. Make a day in advance if possible. So now you are armed with everything you need for a successful prime rib feast! John Setzler #AtlantaGrillBlog #PrimeRib101 Here's the video from my December 2020 Prime Rib Cook:
    16 points
  3. This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance.... Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason. So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips. This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up. Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour. Finally, assembled and eaten! Very tasty indeed!
    16 points
  4. Shortly after the Covid pandemic hit, even though I had never painted or had any art classes, I started painting rocks and leaving them around the neighborhood, in hopes of maybe lifting my neighbors spirits when they found them. I started with cartoony images and posive statements, I picked up river rocks at a local landscape yard for $3.00 a 5 gal bucket and have continued painting, even as the Covid threat has diminished. I put an art table in the garage, and usually spend some portion of the day out there painting. I started off painting simple images and then the birds and animals I saw on our property behind the house. Probably due to the south western heritage of where we live, lately, I have been painting old historical black and white photos of Indian chefs. Here's one I painted of an old man wrapped in a blanket in black and white to match the historical photo.I am finding that Painting is a lot like kamado cooking, in that, the more you do it the more you learn and the better and more confident you get. You can't eat the paintings, but making them certainly gives me a "pleasure in the process" similar what I feel when cooking on my Egg.
    13 points
  5. Rustic Autumn 5 Course Meal My Challenge Cook Autumn and Apple Theme Appitizer Seafood Lettuce Cups Autumn Wild Rice Soup serve with Homemade Bread W/Honey Butter Steak with Shrimp Cream Sauce, Serve with Potatoes Autumn Apple Salad w/Apple Cider vinaigrette Autumn Apple Cheesecake with Carmel This was a very long meal. But it came out great. Was very full after this. Thanks for looking Skreef Running out of time........
    13 points
  6. Here we go with the Challenge Cook entry. I went for a 7 course Spanish style meal (Iberia, not Mexico) and we've just finished feeding 5 over quite a few hours. No complaints..... First up, a little Tapas selection. 36 month cured, hand carved Jamon Iberico from the black footed pigs that root for acorns on the Iberian peninsula. Proper melt in the mouth. White anchovies, 24 month old Manchego cheese and Membrillo (quince jelly made from my quince tree). Served with a nice Cava (Spainish sparkling white wine). Next, Gazpacho Andaluz. Basically fresh vegetables in a glass. Tasty and refreshing. Followed by grill seared scallops with Morcilla, which is Spanish black pudding or blood sausage. Served with some cauliflower puree. I did say I was going to go with offal, but to be honest I don't think blood counts. These were excellent and the contrast between the sweet scallops and the Morcilla is wonderful. Sorry, but I didn't take photos of cooking the scallops. We had a bottle of young Spanish white wine with with this. Marques de la Sierra to be exact. Very nice indeed. Main course, seafood paella (with a bit of chicken thrown in). And a bottle of Rioja. Followed up with a Sherry, Black Tea and Cardamom granita as a palette cleanser. Then Spanish Flan Finally, as a digestive, Spanish solero brandy, cafe solo and an almond tartlet. I am now officially full and life is good!
    13 points
  7. 1. Season them with GPR-86 2. Smoke them 3. Eat them Kinda a joke on my part but I don't find it necessary to go through all the hoops so many people tout. I hit these with my personal rub, no binder but I did give it time on the board to adhere. Hickory wood, 220°f for maybe 4 hours. About 3.5 pounds each. No glaze or sauce. Peeled the silver skin and hit them with rub. Let them sit long enough to look moist. No pullback from the bone yet but looking good. Now that is what you want! Finally ready to plate, served dry with wardolf salad. A nice bit of pull off of the bone, a great rib eating experience.
    13 points
  8. My wife and I were craving burgers, so of course I decided was going to throw some on for last night's dinner. Then I remembered I had some hot dog buns I needed to use, so I put out some 'dogs. Which, in turn, made me start thinking about making some hot dog chili. And my favorite thing with chili is slaw. And then, what's a burger and dog dinner without fries? Before you know it, I spent nearly the whole afternoon in the kitchen. (Not a complaint; just a statement of fact.) Completely forgot to photograph the chili. The "fries," coated in evoo, kosher salt, and rosemary. Roasted in the Jr. for about 45 minutes at 400F. Forgot to get a pic of them on the fire. Slaw made and meats prepped. Coming off the grill One big messy plate of tastiness.
    12 points
  9. so I went to our butcher and asked for 2.5” bone in tomahawk ribeyes. He comes back out with 3 steaks that are at least 3” thick and he cut the tomahawk handle off. I was less than happy, but decided to take them anyway because they’d cook up okay without the handle. Because of the thickness, I went at 225 until they hit 115, let them rest and come up to 122 while the Big Joe III got up to around 650, then seared them off for about 45 seconds per side. Rested again and bam! Ready to go...and served them up with some Cajun grilled shrimp. Delicious.
    12 points
  10. I started out heating up my Dutch oven on the Big Joe. Then, I added sausage to the hot pot for a few minutes. Next, I added one clove of minced garlic and two sliced carrots. Once the vegetables began to soften, I added six cups of chicken broth. Once the broth started to broil, I stirred the Yukon gold potatoes. I partially covered the soup and simmered until the potatoes were tender. Once the potatoes were tender, I threw in a pinch of red pepper and a handful of fresh spinach. Lastly, stirred and served.
    12 points
  11. Tonight's Dinner ribeye, cabbage and brussels sprouts
    11 points
  12. philpom

    Miyabi has arrived.

    My kids got me a gift certificate for Sur la Table for my birthday. They said, "for a knife dad". So I snagged this guy, it feels great, very light and nimble. Now I need to cook something. Something special about Japanese blades, just knowing someone put their heart and soul in to making it versus a highly automated process.
    11 points
  13. I swore off buying new grills so I couldn't do that again but I never said anything about a new truck. Me and Mrs skreef wanted to get a bigger trailer (a 5th wheel) and our Nissan Titan was not going to cut it. Back in January I started looking around for a HD truck. Ended up doing a factory order of a Ram. From order date to dealer delivery was about 11 weeks. Here she is: Ram 3500 6.4 Hemi, 4x4 crew cab, short bed Laramie lv1, towing technology package, bed utility package, and 5th wheel/gooseneck prep GVWR 11,000 Max Towing 14,525 CCC 4025 GCWR 21,500
    11 points
  14. I came up with this a couple of years ago because, we were tired and hungry and needed to cook what ever was in the fridge and pantry. It became a family staple with a number of variations. I am cooking the one shown here on my gasser, but the dish was formulated on my Egg. So what is it. Simple, take the number of bone less chicken thighs you need to feed whom ever you are cooking for. Lay a sheet of plastic wrap on your cutting board with the thighs on top, put another layer of plastic wrap on top and pound them thin. In this variation I made a mixture of canned Hatch green chilies , ( in the late spring and summer I use fresh roasted hatch I get at the market), sliced green onion, and Hatch enchilada sauce. I slather the thighs with the chili mixture and then some Mexican cheese. Next , you roll the suckers up and tie them together with butchers twine. Grill until they have an IT of 175, they are thighs so they can actually go to 180 and stay moist and delicious. Take some of the enchilada sauce and heat it in a pan on your grill. I use and avocado, tomato, salad as a side. You can use Spanish rice, corn, pretty much anything. Variations include Italian with olive tapenade, sun dried tomatoes, and roasted garlic. Or Greek, with feta cheese, sliced olives, roasted garlic, fresh tomatoes etc. Tastes amazing and works for kids, as well as adults. Try it you will like it. Heres a couple pics of tonights dinner. I have cooked this in a number of variations, it's always, quick, delicious, and a crowd pleaser. Only thing you can really do to screw it up is to forget to cut the strings before you serve it. How do I know that, don't ask.
    11 points
  15. When the pandemic hit and all the shelter in place orders went out, toilet paper flew off the shelves. I didn't know it at the time but along with toilet paper there was a run on bicycles. This summer we wanted to get Mrs skreef a nice beach cruiser style bicycle but all the nice ones were "out of stock" or "on backorder". I kept looking and eventually found a custom bicycle shop (Vivelo Bicycles) in Miami that was still filling orders but with a bit of a delay. We decided to buy one of their fully customized LaDonna bikes. Mrs skreef configured her colors and options then the long wait began. 8 weeks later it finally arrived. Yay! Both her bicycle and mine have Nexus 7 speed internal geared rear hubs. Hers is a twist grip shifter while mine has a vintage Schwinn Stingray suicide shifter. Time to go riding.
    11 points
  16. Originally I was going to cook some ribeye steaks and scallops for Father's Day, but fate (see below) had other plans. Those items were given away or repurposed, and I had to wait until last night for a second chance at my Father's Day meal. In the interim, I found a piece of tri-tip at the grocers and thought I'd try something out. Menu: Braised Tri-tip with Parmesan Cream Sauce Pan-Fried Scallops Garlic and Rosemary Potatoes Grilled Seasoned Asparagus The meat was seasoned with salt, extra pepper, and paprika, then seared. Then two cups of Marsala wine and one of beef broth were added, along with chopped garlic, bay leaves, and rosemary and thyme sprigs from the garden. I cooked it for about 40 minutes with the lid off to grab extra flavor, then closed it up for the remainder for about 4.5 hours of total cook. When it was done, I pulled the very tender meat out to rest and cooked down the juices to concentrate the flavor. When I chopped up the meat the pieces went back in this concentrate. The cream sauce was just heavy cream, butter, goat cheese, parmesan, oregano, and basil flakes. The potatoes were cooked with a stick of butter, chopped rosemary, and garlic. When the meat was pulled off the grill, the foil pack of the asparagus went on. When the potatoes were done, I removed them to a bowl, then I ramped up the grill temp to cook the scallops in the potato butter. Should have gone hotter for a better sear, but time was getting tight. I was very happy with how everything turned out, the cream sauce especially. It paired great with everything on the plate. And now for what could possibly cause me to cancel Father's Day with my wife and son? Well, this little princess decided to gift herself on the 20th for a surprise gift Father's Day morning, a bit earlier than we were expecting. Her appetite is nearly insatiable, so it won't be long before the problem of what to do with the pulled pork leftovers takes care of itself.
    10 points
  17. As you all may have read I got a new truck a little over a week ago. A Ram 3500. Well you can't have a new truck without a new trailer. Today we picked up our new Grand Design, Reflection 337rls Unfortunately as bad luck would have it I picked up a hitch hiker on the way home from the dealer. My TPMS did it's job and with a few roadside air refills I was able to limp it back home. I'm a little bummed about a ruined brand new Goodyear Endurance.
    10 points
  18. Lumpy_Coal

    Pizzas

    Made six pizzas on by Classic and my Big Joe last night. Turned out great. Temps were 450-500. I’m learning to let the kamado(s) come up to temp slower and spend more time heat soaking. Also, to reduce stress and avoid ruining pizzas, I set the oven to low broil in case there’s a need to finish the top more so people will get desired crust...finishes perfect and you still get that same great taste.
    10 points
  19. philpom

    5 course meal

    Turns out that our 25 year anniversary was yesterday so earlier in the week I started to hatch an idea and menu. We decided a full formal would be fun but while we did barrow heavily from the Russian formal table setting we did slack a little here and there. Course 1 The appetizer Broiled baguette with blue cheese topped with basil butter. Course 2 soup French onion soup with broiled baguette topped with Swiss cheese. Course 3 salad caprese salad drizzled with olive oil and a balsamic reduction. Course 4 meat seared lamb rib chops and roasted petite potatoes seasoned with herbs and gouda cheese. Drizzled with Green goddess sauce. Course 5 dessert Home-made vanilla ice cream and fresh pears drizzled with a Home-made dark chocolate sauce. We served a Texas Hill Country Claret with dinner. I'll picture ingredient and action photos in course order. 1. I Baked the bread, cut it real thin and put crumbles between 2 pieces, topped with basil butter. 2. Made the beef broth from scratch, took 20 hours. Roasted the shank for 40 minutes and combined with water, onion, garlic, pepper, celery Bay leaf and spices. Simmered for 18 hours, filtered, chilled and skimmed. Then proceeded to caramelize the onions for the soup. Topped a this slice of bread with Swiss cheese and broiled until golden. 3. Basil came from our garden. 4. Seared the lamb over an ultra hot fire for 20 seconds then chilled them, seasoned with salt and pepper and vacuum bagged them. Finished them sous vide at 130°f and garnished with rosemary and mint from the garden. 5. Peeled and sliced pears, blended half and half with the dark chocolate for sauce. The ice cream recipe used maple syrup and homemade vanilla bean extract from whole bean and vodka. We planned a 6th course of homemade Kahlua and dark roast but called it after dessert. !!!!Please ignore the photos below, I can't remove them for some reason. They are related but either a dup or a picture I didn't intend to post.
    10 points
  20. I used the excuse of my farrier coming to shoe to cook a Prime Rib on the Joe and serve a full five course meal for him and his wife. I didn't do a lot of photos of the cooking process because I was kinda busy. The menu was Cajun Popcorn- crispy fried crawfish tails with Crystal sauce and blue cheese crumbles. The Crystal sauce is from The Redfish Grill in New Orleans: 2 parts Crystal Hot Sauce to 1 part melted butter and 1 part honey, they serve it with crispy fried oysters. Next course was Lobster Bisque (made with frozen whole lobster). Course 3 was a Red and Gold Roasted Beet Salad with Goat Cheese Crumbles and Pistachios and a Herbes de Provence vinaigrette. The entree was Pecan Smoked Prime Rib served with Gratin Dauphinois potatoes and Creamed Spinach. Dessert was a Inside Out German Chocolate Cake. I used Adam Perry Lang's recipe for "Any Time of Year Prime Rib" which I have done before and it makes a great Prime Rib. Lobster Bisque recipe: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/76637/perfect-lobster-bisque/ The Beet Salad recipe: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/beet-and-goat-cheese-salad-with-pistachios-107426 The German Chocolate Cake recipe: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/inside-out-german-chocolate-cake-103202 The Wines were a Sunce Vineyard Capay Valley Viognier and a Wrath K W Ranch Pinot Noir. The start of beet salads Starting lobster bisque The only change I made to the recipe was boiling the lobster shells and legs in the chicken stock for 45 minutes to extract as much lobster flavor as possible. Gratin Dauphinois before going in the oven. The star of the show, pulled at 128 IT. Inside Out German Chocolate Cake And now, the Hors d'oeuvres The Soup, Lobster Bisque The Salad Course The Entree, Pecan Smoked Prime Rib with Gratin Dauphinois ans Creamed Spinach Dessert, Inside Out German Chocolate Cake. The Wines My Farrier is about to dig in!
    10 points
  21. KismetKamado

    Locro de Papa

    Decided to revisit South American flavors for this challenge cook. Came up with Locro de Papa - a South American Potato and Cheese Soup. Most of the ingredients are photo’d below. Some cream and milk are missing - as is some garlic. Fired up the KK for this cook. Was burning hotter on the left. Used that to my advantage. Sautéd my onion in some olive oil. Added diced up potatoes a few minutes later. Sautéed those a bit to get them started and then cleared an area in my pan to cook off my Aji Amarillo, garlic, oregano, Chile Flake concoction I made. Let that paste fry up a bit and then mixed it in prior to consolidating with the potatoes and onions. Added my veggie broth and let it go awhile to get the potatoes cooked. Scooted my pot over to the right a bit at this point for a more gentle heat since I was cooking direct. Then added my green beans. This was an impromptu addition. Realized I had some leftover fresh green beans in the fridge and decided to add them. A bit later and I added my corn. And shortly after that my peas. Once that came back up to a simmer, I added in my diced Queso Fresco. Then again let it come back to a simmer. Last step was to add some cream and milk. Brought it in to get ready to serve. And dished up a big bowl. This was really good. The Queso fresco didn’t completely melt into the soup, so there were bits of cheese throughout. And the Aji Amarillo gave a nice, warm burn that was pleasant and not too hot. Definitely a little different from the usual flavors, but extremely good and not too heavy.
    10 points
  22. JeffieBoy

    Turkey Male vs Female

    I don’t know about this discussion string. My wife is smaller and tougher than I am. And if you mention that to her I will hunt you down . . .
    10 points
  23. I lived in Thailand a couple of years so I tend to cook a lot of Thai dishes. "Crying Tiger" is one I have cooked before, but this recipe really shines if you marinate the beef for about an hour. Usually served in a traditional style, this take is in a lettuce cup with a dab of rice to absorb the meat juices, a touch more of the marinade and some julienned carrots for crunch. When I do it again I will add some lime sections for garnish to get a little extra squeeze of lime juice. Finger food at it's finest from the grill. Recipe: https://www.weightwatchers.com/au/recipe/crying-tiger-lettuce-cups-1/56b79d80eeb7e01d6fe8e892
    9 points
  24. July didn't start out very well for me. I decided to do a cleaning burn on my KJC July 2. I had started the cleaning burn and then about an hour into the burn something made me look at the base of my KJ. Here is what I found: I immediately shut down the fire and any plans to cook over the weekend. I still haven't ordered a warranty replacement since I'm not sure how I would get it from my driveway to the deck. I was also unsure of my ability to take the old top off and replace the bottom with the new one and reinstall the top. I also was unsure how long I would be without a grill before the replacement arrived. Therefore, I began researching alternatives. I was looking at possibly getting a Primo grill. I found two places near me that sold Primos. One had sold its last Primo and was going to start selling BGE's. The other place was closed on Sat, Sun, and Mon due to the July 4 holiday. I saw an ad for Ace Hardware, who offers free delivery and setup. I visited my Ace Hardware on July 5 and purchased a BGE, unfortunately they were unable to deliver it until July 15. Another week and a half without being able to grill. My wife commented that she didn't realize how dependent we were on the grill. On July 15, I received my new grill and got it set up. I even paid the guys who delivered my new grill to move my KJ into the garage. I then began the process of getting the grill ready to use. This included taking the KAB and D&C from my KJ and putting it in the BGE. They fit like they were made for the egg. Time to fire it up. I did some different cooks to get used to how it handles and how to control the temperature on the new grill. Some of the cooks were hot dogs, cheese burgers and corn on the cob, and baby back ribs. I was at my local grocery store and they had some beef short ribs. I decided that this would be my cook for this challenge. I seasoned up the ribs and then started the grill to cook them low and slow at 225. I was worried that I might have waited too long to start the ribs so that we could eat at a reasonable time. The grill held the temp nice and steady for the entire cook, which took about five hours. This has been a long-winded post at the beginning, but I was celebrating my new grill and my first attempt at cooking full sized beef short ribs. The ribs came out great.
    9 points
  25. I joked earlier this month in the challenge discussion thread that I would have to quit my job in order to have something to celebrate, or the time to celebrate it for that matter. I guess if I can’t celebrate quitting my job, I can celebrate still having it here 18 years later from when I started - surviving several major downturns along the way - and last years shop shut down as well. Had a simple, but very late night cook on Saturday night before an 8 hour trek on Sunday to spend this week working from North Dakota. Figured it was do or die time if I was going to get a cook in. Nothing wrong with eating at 10 pm, right? Fired up the Big Joe since we are in summer season and hang out on the lower patio. Some simple roasted potatoes going on. Added some green beans once they started getting closer to being done. Then a couple of steaks going on. The husbands plate. I wasn’t really thinking and didn’t snap a picture of mine. Figured I would let the Big Joe burn off overnight so I could thoroughly clean it in the morning before heading out. Underestimated the amount of coal and vent settings and throttled it back too much. It was still cruising around 250 when I got up. Oh well, at least I’ll have a project to do when I get home this weekend.
    9 points
  26. mliebs

    Ribeye Dinner

    Cooked this last weekend. Ribeye, asparagus, bacon wrapped jalapeno's with shrimp and cheese, and stuffed mushrooms. Overall turned out pretty tasty.
    9 points
  27. Hello Kamado Gurus Here’s my Full Couse Meal Challenge entry. I ended up with a seafood themed menu this month. For the kamado cooked portion of the challenge, the hors d’oeuvre and main course were both cooked on the kamado. It was slow going working through the courses with the prepping, cooking, photographing, and well eating… In the end, well worth it, it was a fun challenge. the menu... Curing the salmon, cured 4 days. Cold Smoking, 1 hour using apple wood. Homemade Balsamic pearls Hors d’oeuvre - Smoked Salmon Cucumber Cups w/ Homemade Balsamic pearls Crab cake ingredients. (sorry to pic of the cook on the stove.) Appetizer - Crab Cake Sorbet prep Lime Sorbet with a small sprig of mint. Cooking the salmon, it was marinaded is a simple mix of soy, ponzu, garlic and ginger Main course – Rare Tuna Steaks with Asian Style Green Beans Clarified Milk Punch Prep - followed Alton Brown's recipe, made homemade Allspice Dram using Sous vide Watching the clarification process over the course of an hour. Digestif – Clarified Milk Punch, the taste - wonderful and simple, taste like Christmas in a glass.
    9 points
  28. For my second ever cook on my KJ I decided to try some St. Louis ribs. Used KJ Big Block and a couple of pieces of small oak smoking blocks. I started out rubbing some Worcestershire on both sides, then added Terry Black’s pork dry rub and let them sit while I got my grill up to temp. My target temp was 250. I ended up stabilizing at 260 and backed the top vent down a bit more. The temp came down to 240 and stabilized there for the rest of the cook. I cooked them at about 240 for 3 hours without opening the dome. Checked them and they needed a bit longer so I let them go another hour, pulled them and had an awesome late lunch with my wife while watching football. No sauce, no foil. My wife said please don’t change a thing next time haha.
    9 points
  29. Made up a little baste off butter, salt, thyme and lemon zest for these. I like to keep the flavours nice and subtle when cooking things like this. Indirect heat for the tails and direct heat for the scallops.
    9 points
  30. skreef

    Taco Soup

    This is my Soup Challenge We Love Taco Soup at the Reef's House. So it was a no brainier what to make. Ingredients: Browned the Hamburger Meat then added the Bell Pepper and Red Onion. Sauteed them bout a minute or so. Then I added Pepirika, Red Pepper Flakes, Chili Seasoning, Cumin, Garlic, Oregano and Bay Leaves. Next all the other ingredients are added. Tomatoes, Tomato sauce, Great Northern Beans, and Corn. Put on Grill. 300 degrees which gave it a nice slow boil. Kept on grill for bout 2 hours. My Plated Shot We often eat Taco Soup from a bag, which is great for week night easy meal. But I think for now on Homemade is the way to go. Added Cheddar Cheese and Taco Strips. This Recipe was very Delicious. Thanks for looking Skreef
    9 points
  31. adauria

    First Whole Brisket

    I had some friends coming over last night, so I decided to try my hand at a brisket. I had a ~12lb whole packer USDA prime brisket in my freezer, which I started thawing earlier in the week. Wednesday night I trimmed, I'd guess ~3lbs of fat from it, and seasoned it simply with lots of salt and pepper. The tricky part was estimating cook time. I decided to wake about 2 AM Thursday, give the Big Joe about an hour to get to temp (shooting for 250 F the whole time), then put the brisket on the smoker around 3 AM, which is just how it played out. I was hoping for about 12 hours to cook, then rest the flat while I spend about 2 hours making burnt ends. But you know what they say about plans... After about 8 hours my brisket seemed stalled at 165 and the bark looked pretty good, so I decided to wrap it in butcher paper. I might have done well to wait longer here, but I didn't. At that point it was around 11 AM. Well, by 1:30 PM it was reading about 207 F everywhere and was probe tender. It had to come off WAY before the ~6 PM start of the dinner. I put the paper-wrapped brisket in a layer of HD aluminum foil, put that in a cooler, put a heating pad on max temp on top of that, and covered the whole thing with a few towels. I just prayed it would still be warm by 6 PM. I debated separating the flat/point at about 4 PM and going for burnt ends, but I was so afraid of losing too much heat in the process that I decided to skipp the burnt ends this go-around (next time, though, with better timing I will definitely go for it). At 6 PM I took it out, unwrapped it, and separated the point and flat, and cut everything as appropriate. The meat was amazing!! Great smoke and flavor, juicy, tender, and definitely still warm enough. I got rave reviews. Despite also serving my guests pulled pork (reheated from a previous cook) and 2 chickens, there were almost no brisket leftovers. I am now feeling more confident and wiser about this and would not hesitate to do it again.
    9 points
  32. A really easy soup which I've made many times in the past except this time I added grilled shrimp to give it a little something more. My best version to date. Tuscan Tomato and Shrimp Soup with beans and spinach. The base ingredients in the Dutch oven about to go on my 19" Komodo Kamado. After it simmered for awhile I grilled some Italian marinated shrimp on the 16" Komodo Kamado using a wok basket. When the soup was finishing up I added the spinach, shrimp and a dash or two of extra virgin olive oil. Dinner was served. A little fresh grated parmesan cheese and a slice of sour dough bread.
    9 points
  33. Golf Griller

    Green Chili Stew

    I have been wanting to make some green chili for a while. I used to make it regularly when we lived in Colorado and grew chilies in our garden. We live in a townhouse now, and don't have a vegetable garden; therefore, I had to visit a local farmer's market to purchase the chili peppers. Mostly pablano peppers with a couple of jalapenos and a hot banana pepper. First thing I did was char the peppers and then put them a bowl covered with cling wrap to allow me to easily remove the skins. The rest of the ingredients included some cubed up pork stew meat, the last of the panchetta that I used in the last challenge cook, a can of fire roasted tomatoes, one box of chicken stock, and a whole white onion. The peppers were diced up to add to the stew. Next I added the panchetta to the dutch oven to start to render its fat. There was not enough fat, so I had to add some extra virgin olive oil. I then added the pork and the onion to get some browning on the pork. Ready for the rest of the ingredients. Here it is ready to take off the grill and serve. And here is a nice big bowl along with a whole wheat tortilla to dip in it. I cooked enough that I was able to get three meals out of it. It got spicier the longer that it sat in the refrigerator. I also took some over to my neighbor.
    9 points
  34. Let me start by saying that I haven’t been using the Akorn too often this summer. The lockdown has really affected my interest in a lot of things including cooking for friends and family. That is also why the following didn’t get done in time for the summer challenge. Earlier this summer our local cancer centre and now covid ICU announced a fund raising effort called the Grand Grill. The idea being that you would invite friends or family for dinner and they would donate to the event directly through the hospital website. Kinda like running a 10k fundraiser race except with food. I set up an account and named it “The Kamado Guru Tribute”. I want you all to know that I appreciate all that you've taught me these last 10 years and thusly named it in YOUR honour. I have asked that all donations to my page be used for immediate needs in either the cancer or covid areas. I asked my sister to assist me and she sent the link out to her high falooting friends. Within hours it was sold out and we exceeded our goal four-fold. We had planned on serving pulled pork on a bun with some slaw and another salad. We have now added fresh Corn and field Tomatoes, beer from my S-I-L’s brewery and I have had to buy extra of everything since we have been overloaded with requests to attend. Ontario is now in level 3 and we are allowed to have open groups. Turns out that all of these seniors have been hiding away for 18 months and are chomping at the bit to get out of the house and tomorrows the day! So I have the Akorn going now and just put four pork shoulder roasts on with another to go in the morning. These four will come off at 11pm and go into slow cookers to finish overnight. The Akorn is making groaning sounds from the weight of the meat! LOL I think this is going to work! More to follow.
    8 points
  35. We started putting peach trees in 2 years ago and this year we had a great crop of about 65 peaches. Mrs philpom canned a bunch as peach bbq sauce. For the test I tried it out on this loin. 300°f w/a bit of hickory. Glazed it about 30 minutes before I pulled it. IT was 145°f. The sauce was great for this purpose, next I might add some heat and do wings.
    8 points
  36. 8 points
  37. I own several high-end Shun and Miyabi chef's and santoku knives, but have always lusted after a Kramer Pure Carbon chef's knife. What finally convinced me to buy was seeing a used one sell on eBay for $5 less than a brand new one. Once I decided to buy, I had a hard time finding one available from all of the usual sellers. Finally I found one and it was delivered yesterday. Here are a few photos while it is still virgin. It's maiden voyage will be this weekend when I make a tian of eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes and shallots Provencal. Right now, I am one happy Irishman. Thanks for looking and Happy Cooking.
    8 points
  38. pesto3

    Bacon on the Big Joe 3

    Home made, no nitrite bacon on the Big Joe 3. Smoked over hickory at 260f for just under 3 hours. .
    8 points
  39. Well, today marks my 71st trip around the sun. SWMBO decided my game apparently needed upping. She still loves me.
    8 points
  40. adm

    Pick a Pan - Arroz Negro

    Maybe/maybe not my entry for the April "Pick a Pan" challenge, here is "Arroz Negro". Black rice with squid and prawns - oh and squid ink to make it all black. This is basically a paella - although apparently in Spain it is definitely NOT a paella for some reason. I'm not sure why. Maybe it's because it's meant to be a bit wetter and without the crusty socorrat. Who knows? Anyway....first off you need some squid. Clean it, slice it up and marinade in milk for a few hours to tenderise it a little. Sauté the squid in olive oil for a minute or two until it has a little bit of colour, then remove. Add onion and some more olive oil and fry that off. Then add lots of garlic (1 head in this case) and grated tomato. Fry that off for a few minutes. Add a glass of white wine and reduce that. Then add the Bomba rice, give it a stir around to make sure every grain is covered and then add your stock. My stock in this case was a fish stock, with some saffron infused in it and then the squid ink. Once the rice has absorbed the stock - about 15 minutes - add the squid back and put some prawns in. Cook for another 5-7 minutes, then take off the heat, leave to stand a bit, sprinkle with some flat leaf Parsley a bit of lemon juice and serve with some crusty bread and butter.
    8 points
  41. adm

    Iberico Pork Ribs

    Here's some super tasty pork ribs from last week. These are from the black pigs from the Spanish Iberian Peninsula. They roam wild on the hills and in the woods and eat a diet of acorns, mushrooms and whatever they forage for. This makes them really intense in flavour! This was a bit of a cheat cook as I was following a Spanish recipe, so braised them with garlic, carrot, celery, thyme, bay leaves, star anise and cloves and then only finished them on the Kamado with a quince glaze. Served with Patatas Aioli and asparagus. They were good.....
    8 points
  42. 8 points
  43. YeSSSirrRRR!!! This is a ridiculous cut that they do on these beef ribs. They are definitely more than twice the height of the beef ribs I buy a RD and other places. Can't wait to thaw and cook
    8 points
  44. This week I finalized the Challah recipe I had been working on. This version will be my recipe for now on. I also did test run on Stollen bread and very happy with result. Merry Christmas everyone and stay safe.
    8 points
  45. hi all. I'm still very new to kamado cooking but tonight I cooked a 3lb 2oz tomahawk and I thought I'd share. Seasoned only with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper here is the result. I have to say it was awesome. Cooked to med rare. Beautiful.
    8 points
  46. Smoked this tomahawk over pecan at 200f on the Big Joe with some poppers. Took it off at an internal of 115f and then seared it on the Jr. served up with some creamy mushroom sauce. . . . this was amazing!! cheers!
    8 points
  47. Hello Kamado Gurus I decided to re-make a tomato soup, a variation of one I made last month in a pressure cooking. This time it was on the kamado. This was more of wing-it type recipe: · About 4 pounds of fresh Roma tomatoes from the farmers market · Tomato paste, a can of… · A head of garlic cloves, Can of San Marzano tomatoes · Olive oil · Fresh basil · Chicken Base, and Vegetable base. The tomatoes and garlic were roasted in the oven for about 45-50 minutes. I started the soup earlier on October. Given schedule conflicts, I froze the base for a couple weeks. After starting the base recipe, I changed the recipe mid-stream. I found another on-line recipe that included a can of white beans, and roasted red peppers, so I adjusted the recipe this past weekend. The inclusion of the beans made the soup more creamy. The roasted peppers added depth of flavor. To finish the tomato soup I added some fresh basil, some fried white beans, and some double fried plantains, with a nice grilled cheese sandwich (with some 18-month prosciutto) on the side. Dinner was well received by all….
    8 points
  48. This one took a while. Three days in total, but it was super tasty. First off, I made up an Asian style chicken stock. Chicken carcass, star anise, ginger, scallions, onion, peppercorns and garlic. This got about 5 hours slowly bubbling away. Once that was ready, I strained it through a muslin, fed the chicken parts to the dogs and put the stock in the freezer. The next day, I made the Laksa paste. This has lots of ginger, onions, garlic, dried and fresh chillies, lemon grass and spices. The brown blocky bits in the photo below are belachan - which is Indonesian fermented shrimp paste. It stinks a bit, but it adds lovely flavour. That all gets blended up and then fried for about 30 minutes stirring constantly. I did this on the indoor hob as stirring constantly in the rain on my Kamado wasn't part of the plan that day! You end up with something like this. The cooked paste then needs to go into the fridge for 24+ hours for all the flavours to meld properly. When that's all done, to make the actual soup I took the stock I had made, plus the paste, plus two cans of coconut milk, palm sugar, tamarind paste, more lemon grass and a load of "Laksa leaves", otherwise known as "hot mint" or "Vietnamese coriander". This is a plant called Persicaria odorata which is a staple in Vietnamese cooking - and apparently in Laksa as well. Who knew? Luckily, I already have it growing in my herb garden. Let this all simmer for a while on the Kamado At this point, it was dark outside and raining again. But we are pretty much done now. So inside we go again. To assemble the dish itself, you need to blanch off some noodles, shrimp, beansprouts, green beans. I also poached a chicken breast and added some fried tofu puffs to my soup broth. Then pour the hot broth over the rest of the ingredients in the bowls and served piping hot. Oh - and add half a soft boiled egg, plus some fresh chilli to taste.
    8 points
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