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John Setzler

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Everything posted by John Setzler

  1. The airlift hinge is not retrofittable to the classic 1 or the big joe 1. Kamado Joe does have a newer model replacement hing for the Big Joe that is similar to the airlift but not quite the same. The airlift hinge uses thicker bands than the original hinges. If I remember correctly, the 2 and 3 model Joes are slightly thicker ceramic to support the pressures from the bands on the new hinges as well.
  2. @ImAPepper Is the problem only in the way it appears or is it presenting an issue with cooking?
  3. The Man Cave White Sandwich Bread is a perfect sandwich loaf. This is easy to make and the rewards are definitely worth the work! I am giving the ingredients for this loaf in metric weight AND standard volume measurements. IT IS IN YOUR BEST INTEREST to use the metric weights for consistency. Digital kitchen scales are cheap. I have also included some notes for enhancements and additions to this loaf... Ingredients: 115g whole milk (1/2 cup) 165g water (3/4 cup minus 1 1/2 tsp) 440g bread flour (3 1/4 cup) 21g sugar (2 tablespoons) 9g diamond crystal kosher salt (1 tablespoon)* 6g instant or active dry yeast (2 teaspoons) 45g unsalted butter, softened (3 tablespoons) * If using standard table salt, use 2 teaspoons Combine water, milk, and sugar in a small bowl and heat in the microwave gently to a temperature of about 100°F. Pour in the yeast and let sit at room temperature for 10-15 minutes until the yeast is nice and foamy. Add the flour and sugar to the bowl of a stand mixer and wisk together. Start the mixer on a slow speed and add the liquid yeast mixture. Mix until the dough has come together in a shaggy mass. Add the butter and continue to mix until the butter is incorporated in the dough. Let the dough hook continue to knead the dough for 10 minutes until you have a smooth dough ball that is pulling away cleanly from the sides of the mixing bowl. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and shape it into a tight dough ball. Place it in a greased bowl and cover with plastic. Let rise for 60-90 minutes until at least doubled in size. Punch the dough down and turn it out onto a lightly greased working surface. Shape it into a rectangle slightly narrower than the width of the bread pan. Roll it up tightly, pinch the seam, and place seam side down into a greased 5x9 inch loaf pan. Cover with a towel and let rise for an hour or so until the dough has risen about an inch over the top edge of the bread pan. About 30 minutes into this rise, preheat your oven to 375°F. If you would like to top the bread with anything, mist the top of the loaf lightly with water and add your toppings. Place it in the oven for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, let cool for 15 minutes in the pan. Remove from the pan and cool completely before slicing. Notes: I have experimented several times with some whole wheat flour in this loaf. My favorite variation is to substitute about 20 grams of the bread flour with whole wheat flour. The small addition of whole wheat flour give the bread a really nice earthy aroma without sacrificing any of the light and fluffy texture. I like topping mine as shown in the video with the Trader Joe's "Everything but the Bagel" seasoning blend. Another good way to top this loaf is to just bake it naked and then brush on some melted butter that has had some garlic powder added. I recommend melting about 3 tablespoons of butter and stirring in about 1/4 tsp garlic powder. Brush that on top of the baked loaf while it's still hot. You can also turn this loaf into cinnamon-raisin bread quite easily. When you spread the dough out into a rectangle as shown in the video, spread about 3 tablespoons of softened butter on the surface. Top that with a mixture of cinnamon and sugar and then sprinkle on some raisins before you roll it up. This loaf of bread holds up very well. I have kept it fresh for 4 or 5 days by keeping it in a plastic bag after it has cooled. Enjoy!
  4. The new one is gonna peel as well. My recommendation is to just let it peel. It works better once the mating surface paint has all peeled off.
  5. I have breathed new fire into my DoJOE by using it for things other that pizza. ANYTHING that needs a good browning on top comes out way better cooking it on the DoJOE instead of cooking by standard techniques..... I have been experimenting with a lot of success...
  6. @BKF Moving to the Kamado Joe section of the forum....
  7. @AJS390 I would get started cooking and not worry about replacing it until you find a need to replace it. The gaskets are gonna come loose at some point. Most of them do. The adhesive they put them on with is not very durable. When they DO come loose I recommend pulling them off, cleaning the surface underneath them with acetone (don't worry about getting it really clean) and then re-attach the gaskets with a very small bead of Permatex Copper that you can grab at your local auto parts store. Those gaskets will likely never come loose again on their own. I have reattached gaskets on both of mine with this and they haven't given me any issues since then.
  8. It's just unsafe to try to install the door without removing the screws that hold the right side of the sliding vent on the Kamado. No one wants to do that though because it involves taking the firebox out of the grill to get to the nuts ont he back side of the screws...
  9. @JohnnyAppetizer i do it different ways... if i want a LOT of coal banked to one side i use the divider. If the divider is already in the grill and I don't need a lot of coal i may leave it in... It just all depends on the cook.
  10. Chicago style deep dish pizza is an amazing meal. It's also one of those things that either inspires love or hate from pizza aficionados. It's either the best pizza out there or it just ain't pizza! It's entertaining to watch these debates take place. But anyway.... Here is a recipe that is rather easy to make and the results will blow you away. I am going to give you the recipe for this 12" pizza. I'll also include the dough ingredient amounts for a smaller 9" version... Sauce: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium white onion, finely diced 1 clove garlic, finely minced 1/2 tsp dried basil 1/2 tsp dried oregano 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes 2 to 3 tablespoons tomato paste 1 28oz can San Marzano Tomatoes, coarsely crushed by hand Salt to taste Heat a large pan and add the olive oil. When the oil is hot saute the onion for 4 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for another minute. Add the basil, oregano, red pepper flakes, and tomato paste and stir to combine completely. Add the tomatoes and bring to a slow simmer. Reduce until thickened as shown in the video and add salt to taste. The flavor on this sauce develops beautifully if you can do this part one day in advance and toss the sauce in the fridge. Let the sauce come back to room temp before assembling the pizza. If you don't want to make sauce, you may use your favorite commercial pizza sauce. Dough for 12" pizza: 350g (2 1/2c) all purpose flour 70g (1/2c) cornmeal 8g (2 tsp) kosher salt 8g (2 tsp) sugar 7g (2 1/4 tsp) instant or active dry yeast 235g (1 cup) room temperature water 45g (3 tablespoons) extra virgin olive oil plus more for the pan Dough for 9" pizza: 260g (2 1/2c) all purpose flour 50g (1/3c) cornmeal 6g (1 1/2 tsp) kosher salt 6g (1 1/2 tsp) sugar 5g (1 3/4 tsp) instant or active dry yeast 175g (3/4 cup) room temperature water 30g (2 tablespoons) extra virgin olive oil plus more for the pan To make the dough, put the water and sugar in the bowl of your stand mixer. Add the yeast and let it sit for 15 minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix with the dough hook for about 8 minutes. Shape the dough into a tight ball and put it in a greased bowl covered with plastic to let it rise for 60 to 90 minutes until doubled in size. Preheat your Kamado Joe to 425°F with the DoJOE in place. If you aren't using the DoJOE, just use heat deflectors or the SLoROLLER for an indirect heat setup. Roll the dough out into a well oiled pan and spread to the edges as best you can. Cover with plastic and let rest for 20 minutes. Finish stretching the dough and add your toppings as desired or as shown in the video. Cook for 25-35 minutes until done and then behold the masterpiece you have created. Enjoy! #ChicagoDeepDishPizza #KamadoJoe #AtlantaGrillCompany
  11. John Setzler

    Which KJ?

    A majority of folks WILL tell you to go big or go home, especially if they have done that. You can buy the big joe and cook on it with no problems. It just does use more coal and it takes longer to heat it up. If those things aren't an issue then the Big Joe is a good choice too. The best case scenario is two kamado, both of which could be the classic or one of each...
  12. I prefer the KJ baskets if you are using the KJ Divide & Conquer system.
  13. John Setzler

    Cracked

    I hope your experience is good with the customer service. There have been a lot of ugly delays lately due to shipping and inventory issues associated with COVID logistics issues.
  14. The old style vents stick too... When the powdercoating peels off it will start to work better. Maybe I should sell the few old style vents i have laying around here.. lol
  15. 520 is a great temp for cooking most pizzas.... On your second attempt, my guess is that having it at 700+ for 30 minutes before putting the DoJOE in place spent most of your charcoal. It takes 20-30 minutes to preheat the DoJOE properly so you probably ddin't have enough fuel left to preheat the dojoe. Here's my video on how to start the dojoe:
  16. In addition to fbov's comments... there is no need dry before soaking them in water... i'd put them in a water bath and let them soak for an hour.... instead of drying inbetween I would just drain and replace the water 3 or 4 times after about an hour or two of soaking... i think drying in between is just extending the process. Warm/hot water bath should help speed the process along......
  17. John Setzler

    Cracked

    Get your claim filed with Kamado Joe via their website as soon as possible.
  18. John Setzler

    Cracked

    Who did you buy it from?
  19. You might just wanna spend your money on the Weber. Don't overthink it I build fires on one side of my kamado MOST of the time.
  20. I don't think it will hurt anything. The fire in the SnS basket will never be big enough to damage the outer shell.
  21. John Setzler

    Cracked

    I would not use this grill until the dome is replaced.
  22. John Setzler

    Which KJ?

    @TheBear moving this post to the Kamado Joe section of the forum....
  23. John Setzler

    Which KJ?

    I personally would not buy the Big Joe just to cover about 4 large cooks per year. The classic would be MY choice on that. You can feed that many people with a classic as long as you aren't cooking steaks or burgers for everyone. In that case the Big Joe would not be enough either.
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