Jump to content

John Setzler

Administrators
  • Content Count

    15,181
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    342

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from fbov in Why can’t I keep the temperature at 225 degree?   
    This is why
     
    There is a learning curve with Kamado grills.  Not many people master temp control on the first or second or third or fourth try.  
     
    I would recommend having a look at the pinned post in the Kamado Cooking section called "The Kamado Book of Knowledge".  That is a little document I put together that will get you over the learning curve quickly and demystify a lot of notions about kamado cooking.
     
     
  2. Thanks
    John Setzler got a reaction from stream26 in How to Cook a Boston Butt   
    The Boston Butt is one of the “Holy Grails” of barbecue meat.  Sliced and pulled pork barbecue that comes from this cut of meat is one of the tastiest treats you will ever have when it’s cooked properly.  The Boston Butt comes from the upper part of the shoulder on the front legs of the pig.  This cut also usually contains all or part of the scapula (shoulder blade) unless a particularly large butt has been trimmed into multiple pieces.
     
    The Boston Butt is also a perfect cut of meat for a beginning barbecue cook.  It’s easy to cook and very forgiving.    Even if you make some mistakes in your cooking or preparation, the resulting meat should be really good!  
     
    What you Need:
     
    ·         8 to 12 pound Boston Butt
    ·         ¾ to 1 cup of Pork Dry Rub
    ·         Meat Thermometer (digital/quick read/analog/whatever)
    ·         Grill or Oven
    ·         Drip Pan / Roasting Rack
    ·         Cooler large enough to hold the cooked meat
     
    You can certainly find Boston Butts that are smaller than 8 pounds and might even find a few larger than 12 pounds.  I recommend 8-12 pounders because I have had my best results with cuts in this size range.  Smaller cuts (6 pounds and under) seem to give me mixed results.  Cuts in the 6-8 pound range work fairly well, but the larger cuts always give me the results I’m looking for.
     
    When you go shopping for your Boston Butt, look for cuts that are vacuum sealed by the manufacturer.  These vacuum seal packs are sometimes called “cryovac” packaging.  Avoid the cuts that are on Styrofoam trays and shrink wrapped from the local butcher.  These are usually smaller cuts from a larger Boston Butt.
     
    When choosing the size of the Boston Butt you wish to cook, buy one that is at least twice as large as you need in terms of cooked meat.  A Boston Butt has a very high fat content.  Your Boston Butt will shed nearly 50% of its weight during the cook!  An 8 pound cut will yield 4 to 4.5 pounds of cooked meat.
     
    When you are ready to cook your Boston Butt, it must be completely thawed if it has been previously frozen.  You can determine this with a probe thermometer.  Insert the probe thermometer into the center of the meat.  If the meat is still frozen in the center, it will be very difficult to insert the probe.  
     
    Preparing Your Meat:
     
    Start out by cleaning your kitchen sink.  When the sink is clean and rinsed out completely, place your cryovac packaged Boston Butt in the sink and remove the packaging.  Discard the packaging and rinse the meat completely with cold water.  Pat the meat dry with several clean paper towels and move the meat to a large cutting board.
     
    One side of your Boston Butt will be completely covered in fat.  This is called the “Fat Cap.”  Most of this fat is a hard fat that will not dissolve and render out during the cook.  I like to trim most of this fat and toss it out.  Some people like to trim it to a thickness of about ¼ inch, leaving some of the fat on the meat.  Some people just like to score the fat with a sharp knife and leave all of it in place.  It’s up to you.  You will either cut it off before you cook or afterwards.  I prefer to cut most of mine off so I can season that surface with my barbecue rub.  If there are any other surfaces of your Boston Butt that have a heavy amount of fat, trim it as you see fit.
     
    After the meat is trimmed to your satisfaction, it’s time to season it with your barbecue rub.  There are a lot of commercially-available dry rubs for barbecue on the market or you can make your own rather easily.  If you search the web for barbecue dry rub recipes, you will find tons of them.  Use a shaker bottle or jar to apply a liberal coat of your barbecue rub to ALL surfaces of the meat.  When I say “liberal” I mean a coat thick enough where it completely covers the meat to a point where all you see is the rub, but no more than that.  Each time you coat a surface, use the palm of your hand to pat the rub in place where it won’t fall off.  I typically season one side at a time and let it sit in place for a few minutes before flipping it over to season the opposite side.  Some people like to use a “binder” to help hold the rub on the meat.  You can smear a thin layer of plain yellow mustard or a cooking oil on the outside of the meat before you apply your rub to help bind it to the meat if you wish.
     
    Once your barbecue dry rub is applied, let the meat sit for 20-30 minutes on the counter.  You will notice that the rub will get wet as it draws moisture from the surface of the meat.  You can also wrap the meat tightly in plastic or a vacuum sealer bag and put it in the refrigerator overnight if you wish.  The overnight process allows the seasonings to penetrate the meat a little deeper but the results aren’t significantly different in the final cook.  If you choose to wrap it and let it marinate in the refrigerator overnight, re-apply a little extra rub to the surfaces of the meat before you get ready to cook.
     
    Cooking the Meat:
     
    Preheat your grill, smoker, or oven to 250°F. 
     
    If you are using a grill or smoker, add 4 to 5 chunks of smoking wood such as hickory, apple, oak, pecan, or whatever your available options might be.  When you first start the grill or smoker, there will be a good bit of white smoke coming from the smoking wood.  Let the grill or smoker stabilize until that white smoke dissipates into a thinner blue-colored smoke. 
    If you are cooking in an oven, place two 2-cup measuring cups of hot water on the rack to help keep the humidity at a higher level during the cook.  You may have to replenish this water during the cook.
     
    When your grill or smoker is stabilized at 250°F it’s time to get the meat on the grill.  If you are placing your Boston Butt directly on the grill grate, you should insert a drip pan underneath it to catch the fat drippings from the meat.  There will be a LOT of fat drippings.  You can also put the Boston Butt on a roasting rack in a roasting pan on the grill to catch these drippings.  This is the method you should use if you are cooking in an oven.  Do NOT let the fat drip directly into the bottom of the oven.  If you are cooking in an oven, you should also loosely cover the roasting rack with a sheet of aluminum foil. 
     
    Monitoring the Cook:
     
    At 250°F, you can expect your Boston Butt to take approximately 1.5 hours per pound to cook completely.  That’s 12 hours for an 8 pound Butt!  THIS IS JUST A CLOSE ESTIMATE!  Monitoring the internal temperature of the meat with a thermometer or digital temperature probe is the ONLY way to know when the meat is ready.  That being said, there is no exact temperature when the cook is perfectly done.  It takes a little experience to nail this part of the cook perfectly every time.  To determine when the meat is ready, you are looking for a condition known as “probe tenderness.”  This simply means that when you insert a temperature probe, skewer, or other probe type object into the meat that it will slide in effortlessly with very little resistance.  This condition usually happens on a Boston Butt when the internal temperature of the meat reaches somewhere between 195-205°F.  If you are unsure if your “probe tenderness,” It’s a good idea to remove the meat from the grill or oven when the internal temperature reaches 197-198°F.  You will be close enough for most people! 
     
    The best type of thermometer to use for a cook like this is one of the digital meat thermometers that has a temperature probe on a long cable that you can insert into the meat and view the meat temperature from outside the grill or oven.  This will allow you to monitor that temperature without having to open the grill or oven during the process.  Opening the grill or oven just adds to the cook time.  Keep the oven or grill closed and let your thermometer tell you what’s going on inside.
     
    Finishing the Cook:
     
    Once your Boston Butt cook has completed, remove the meat from the grill or oven.  Have a double thickness of aluminum foil sheets prepared that are large enough to completely wrap your meat.  Place the cooked meat on the foil and wrap the meat around the side and leave the top exposed.  Let the Boston Butt sit uncovered in this position for 10 to 15 minutes.  Tightly wrap the meat in the foil and place it in a cooler.  Take an old clean towel and fold it up and place it on top of the meat in the cooler and close the lid.  Let the Boston Butt “rest” in the cooler for at least one hour and up to four hours. 
     
    After the meat has rested for at least an hour in the cooler, you may remove it, place it in a large pan and use a couple forks to pull the meat apart.  During this process, remove any chunks of fat that you might find. 
     
    Serve it!!!
     
    Left-Overs:
     
    Leftover pulled pork should be dealt with immediately or as soon as possible to keep it from drying out.  After you have pulled the pork, place any leftovers in vacuum seal bags if possible.  Ziploc bags will work OK but for freezing leftovers, it’s hard to beat a vacuum sealed bag.  When you place the meat in a vacuum seal bag or Ziploc bag, add a tablespoon of a 50/50 mixture of apple juice and cider vinegar to the bag to add moisture.  If using a Ziploc bag, remove as much air as possible. 
    The magic of a vacuum sealed bag of frozen pulled pork is in the reheating process.  To reheat this properly, all you need to do is drop the bag in a pot of simmering hot water until the meat has reheated. 
     
    Frequently Asked Questions:
     
    Should I inject the meat with a marinade/brine before cooking?
     
    You can if you like.  I have done it and have experimented with a lot of different injection combinations.  If you are just learning how to cook a perfect Boston Butt, I’d recommend skipping the injection and focus on the basic techniques first.
     
    Should I cook the meat with the fat cap up or down?
     
    This is another rather large debate in the barbecue community.  You will get different answers from different people.  I cook mine with the fat cap down.  I like the way my bark forms on the outside of the meat much better when I cook this way. 
     
    Should I put a pan of water in my smoker or grill during this cook?
     
    If your grill or smoker was designed to use a water pan, then I recommend doing it. 
     
    I don’t see any smoke coming out of my smoker or grill.  Should I add more smoke wood chunks?
     
    No.  In fact, a good clean burning fire will not have much visible smoke at all.  It IS possible to over smoke your food, so in many cases with barbecue meat, less is more! 
     
    Should I soak my wood chunks or chips in water before putting them on the smoker?
     
    No.  This won’t make a significant difference in how long the chunks or chips last.  I don’t recommend using chips, but if you do, make a sealed pouch out of aluminum foil and place a cup or so of chips in the pouch.  Press all the air out of the pouch.  Poke one or two small holes in the pouch and place it on top of your lit charcoal.  They will smoke for a long time. 
     
    After I put my meat on the smoker, I started seeing more thick white smoke later in the cook.  Is this bad?
     
    Usually, it’s not bad.  If the fat is dripping directly into the fire or onto a heat deflector that is very hot, you will see this thicker white smoke.  If the drippings in your drip pan get too hot, this will also occur.   It’s nothing to worry about at this stage in the cook. 
     
    Should I spritz the meat during the cook?
     
    In the beginning, I would say no until you are confident with this cooking technique. 
     
    Should I try this, this that, this, that, this and that or this and this and that?
     
    As you advance in your barbecue cooking skills, you will discover lots of tips and tricks worth trying.  My advice is to try new things as often as possible with one restriction.  Try only ONE new thing at a time!  If you try a bunch of different new tricks at once, you won’t be able to determine which tricks had what effect on the final results in terms of taste and/or texture.  
  3. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Tongmaster in Homemade Bacon - Morton Tender Quick   
    Making homemade bacon from pork belly is a lot less difficult than you might imagine.  Making a simple dry cure with Morton Tender Quick or a homemade version of it is quite easy.  If you don't have access to Tender Quick, here's a recipe to make it from scratch:
    1 cup (200g) Kosher Salt
    1/2 cup  sugar (100g) 
    3 1/4 tsp (30g) Pink Curing Salt (Prague Powder #1)
    This recipe makes a LOT more than you need but it keeps indefinitely or you can just make a lot less by scaling it down.  
    The key to making this process work is knowing how much cure to use.  You need to use 2.5% of the weight of your pork belly.  In my video here, my pork belly slab weighed 1077 grams.  So multiply that by 0.025 to determine that *I* needed 27 grams of my curing mixture (Morton Tender Quick.)
    For a typical pork belly, 7 days is enough time to cure it completely.  You can let it go an extra day or two if you wish but don't cut it short.  You can also get as creative as you like with the seasoning and flavoring you choose to introduce to your bacon.  
    I chose to cold smoke this bacon in this video.  The cold smoker I used is here:
    https://atlantagrillcompany.com/search?type=article%2Cpage%2Cproduct&q=a-maze-n*
    If you don't want to cold smoke your bacon, you may smoke it at as low a temperature as possible until your bacon reaches an internal temperature of about 145-150°F.
    Enjoy!
  4. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Graham in Thank You John - Double Cut Pork Chops   
    I just ordered another one of these yesterday as part of my Porter Road order.
  5. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from jtemple in is this legit ? most KJs are 50 off   
    I'd probably avoid this and here's why:
     
    https://www.whois.com/whois/sunlandes.com
     
     
  6. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Scott Roberts in The Kamado Book of Knowledge   
    Thanks for your feedback   This is the first time I have been approached about my gender stereotypical branding.  I decided to have a look at my audience demographics, simply because I haven't really paid much attention to that in the past.  While BBQ, grilling, and outdoor cooking is not gender exclusive, I don't encounter as many women in my social media circles as men.  Over the years I have gained a rather large following and I do love and appreciate every single one of them.  Here's what my YouTube following (22,800 +/-) looks like over the last month:
     

     
    Those numbers are 91.7% and 8.4% over the lifetime of my YouTube channel.
     
    Over on Facebook (17,600 +/-) things look like this:
     

     
    Oddly enough, the gender demographic for me is almost identical in both places.  
     
     
     
     
  7. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from chaluk in How bad is Kamado Joe's customer service?   
    This thread has deviated from it's original topic.  I am locking the thread.  If you wish to continue discussing the issues you have with the Joe Jr. please start a new thread in the Kamado Joe section.
     
    @Joe Swede
  8. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from chaluk in How bad is Kamado Joe's customer service?   
    Folks have been using this forum as a stump since I put it together.  They come, make their complaints, and never come back.  They usually come here and do the same thing on other social media platforms as well.  They aren't looking to leave any impression other than their dislike of the manufacturer.
     
  9. Like
    John Setzler reacted to Ted Sandyman in Kamado Joe Classic III Owner from Down Under   
    Newbie to the world of Kamado BBQ. 
     
    3 weeks ownership of Kamado Joe Classic III.
     
    So far have had varying degrees of success.
     
    Awesome Pulled Pork Shoulder (low and slow), finish with Foil, Towel and Cooler finish. Average Brisket Flat.  First effort was on arrival day and did not allow enough time for the cook.  Was bullied into doing the cook ill prepared and results were commensurate with the rushed preparation and cook.  Second Brisket was well smoked in Kamado, having started in the oven (as per cooking school recipe which I won't follow next time).  It was over cooked, but saved by sauce.  Will not be using that recipe again. First Class direct cook Eye Fillet, using reverse sear technique. Disaster with home made Pizza.  Not the Kamado fault.  I need LOTS more practice with turning the dough into "proper" bases. Ambitious effort to produce a Quiche.  Pleasantly surprised with the result.  
    Recipes and inspiration to date mainly from "Webers American BBQ: A modern spin on the classics" cookbook, and "Smoking Dad BBQ" James from Canada (and others) youtube plus sage advice from Uncle Google.
     
    Have downloaded the Kamado Book of Knowledge ebook from John M. Seltzer following links from this forum.  Awesome looking book and just what I need as a Kamado newbie. Look forward to implementing that learning.
     
    Looking forward to learning from the collective knowledge of the user base on this forum.
     
  10. Like
    John Setzler reacted to deity6667 in The New Fireboard 2 Pro model is finally available for purchase!   
    Mine has arrived - let me know if anyone has any questions!  but so far I'm impressed with everything about this.
     

  11. Thanks
    John Setzler got a reaction from daninpd in How bad is Kamado Joe's customer service?   
    Folks have been using this forum as a stump since I put it together.  They come, make their complaints, and never come back.  They usually come here and do the same thing on other social media platforms as well.  They aren't looking to leave any impression other than their dislike of the manufacturer.
     
  12. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Professor in Kamado Guru - John's Really Right Stuff List   
    The Kamado Guru Really Right Stuff Guide!
     
    NOTE:  I am no longer participating in any affiliate programs.  My recommendations are purely based on experience and my personal likes.  I don't get paid to promote anything you see on this page and I don't get any kickback of any kind from you clicking on any of these links.  The Amazon links ARE my old affiliate links just because I have not changed them since I cancelled my affiliate membership.  The links still work.
     
    The Kamado Guru / Man Cave meals REALLY RIGHT STUFF list is my personal list of stuff that I think is awesome to own.  Most of the stuff on this list is stuff that I have bought myself.  If it was provided to me, I have indicated that on each item.  Regardless of where it came from and who paid for it, if it's on this list, it's something I love and recommend.  
     
    I want to start this guide out with the place where I buy my high quality meat.  When I want something that is amazing quality I go here:
     
    Porter Road - https://porterroad.com
     
    Porter Road approached me earlier and offered to provide me with some of their meat to try.  I accepted that offer and they won me over as a customer in the process.  I am buying meat from them now when I need something exceptional in quality.  
     
    My full review of Porter Road is here:
     
     
    Thermometers:
     
    Thermoworks is at the top of the food chain when it comes to instant read digital thermometers.  They also have some amazing quality remote monitors that I have also.  I own each of the products listed here and I highly recommend them:
     
    Thermapop - LINK
    Thermapen MK4 - LINK 
    Thermoworks SMOKE - LINK 
    Thermoworks SIGNALS - LINK  (Provided to me by Thermoworks)
     
    The Thermoworks Signals has an add-on enhancement that turns it into a grill controller: LINK  The Billows product doesn't offer customized adapters to make it fit your specific grill with any amount of precision so you may need to fabricate one.  I do NOT recommend the Billows product at this time.  I feel like it needs some enhancement on the software side before it's ready for prime time.  If this product evolves into something I like, I will add it to my temperature controller section below.  
     
    Thermoworks IR GUN - LINK
     
    I use an infrared thermometer fairly frequently.  When I am cooking on a soapstone or cast iron griddle, I use my IR thermometer to let me know when I have my temperature in the range I am looking for.  I do a good bit of cooking on flat surfaces that are in the 350-375°F range and then some more in the 475-525°F range.  The IR thermometer just helps me hit the target more quickly.
     
    There are other thermometers out there that work just fine also.  The top of the food chain thermometer I own in the lower price category is:
     
    Lavatools PT18 - LINK 
     
    If you search Google and Amazon for instant read thermometers, you will come up with tons of options that range in price from cheap to not so cheap.  The reason I prefer the Thermoworks stuff is the durability aspect.  If you want durability and don't want to break the bank, grab the Thermapop.  In my extensive experience with those and the Thermapens, The speed is the only real difference in the two.  The Thermapen reads in 2-3 seconds and the Thermapop reads in 5-7 seconds.  
     
    My other favorite Thermoworks product is:
     
    Extra Big & Loud Timer - LINK 
     
    Temperature Controllers that I Own:
     
    I am also a big advocate of using temperature control systems on your Kamado or other grill/smoker.  These can take a good bit of work out of your setup process and they can also give you peace of mind when running a long cook where you aren't attending the grill for the entire time.
     
    BBQ Guru PartyQ - LINK  (6/10/2020 - I think this product has been discontinued.)
     
    This is the most basic system out there.  This is an updated version of the one I have.  The PartyQ does one job and does it very well.  It simply controls the temperature of your pit.  It doesn't give you any extra bells and whistles.  It's battery operated.
     
    Flame Boss 400-Wifi - LINK 
     
    The Flame Boss 400-Wifi is one of the cheapest wifi-controlled pit controllers on the market.  This one will controll the temperature of your pit and monitor the temperature of one meat on the grill.  This unit is controlled via a phone, tablet, or via a web browser on your PC.  It requires a phone or table to get it set up.  
     
    Kamado Joe iKamand - LINK 
     
    (provided to me by Kamado Joe)
     
    The iKamand is very similar to the Flame Boss 400-Wifi in terms of use and control.  This is the one I use on a daily basis.  This unit only works on Kamado Joe grills so if you aren't using a Kamado Joe then don't buy this option.  
     
    Flame Boss 500-Wifi - LINK 
     
    The Flame Boss 500 is the updated and most recent version of an older model that I have (the Flame Boss 200 which was provided to me by Flame Boss.)  This unit also offers wifi control via an app or pc but it also gives you hands-on control at the device itself.  It doesn't require a wifi connection to operate or change the configuration.  You can do all of that from the device itself.  It's capable of controlling the pit temperature and monitoring 3 separate meats at once.  It only comes with one pit probe and one meat probe.  If you want the additional meat probes, they must be ordered separately.  I recommend this unit if you feel like you need something more than the previous models listed here.  I don't use my Flame Boss 200 anymore but if I was going to use it, I would upgrade it to this model.  The only time I would want to use this is if I wanted to run a controller and monitor meats where I had no wifi connection.  
     
    The Fireboard - LINK 
     
    In terms of bells, whistles, and shiny things, the FireBoard system is at the top of the stack.  It's a bit more difficult to understand what you need with the Fireboard, but the base configuration you need for pit control is the basic Fireboard system ($189) with the fan ($59) and the Drive Fan Cable ($79).  In my personal experience, the Fireboard is control unit is so small, light, and fragile, I would never want to use it without the FireBoard Case ($55).  So that base configuration adds up to about $380 making it the most expensive of the list here.  Fully dressed out it costs $440 to take advantage of all six thermometers it's capable of managing.  
     
    I own all of these and my go-to is the iKamand, simply because it is designed to live on my Kamado Joe all the time.  If I was shopping for something else, I would personally prefer the Flame Boss 500-Wifi from this list.  In my opinion, it's the Swiss Army Knife of the group.  
     
    Charcoal Baskets:
     
    If your grill doesn't come with a Charcoal basket, I highly recommend buying one.  Charcoal baskets offer you the ability to EASILY remove ash from your charcoal so that you can easily reuse any leftover coal from your previous cook.  They help create a zero-waste situation with charcoal.  They also promote more even airflow through your charcoal for more efficient burning.  I consider these to be MUST HAVE.  
     
    Kamado Joe Charcoal Basket - LINK (Provided to me by Kamado Joe)
     
    If you own a Kamado Joe grill, the Kamado Joe charcoal basket integrates with the Divide & Conquer cooking rack system included with those grills.  These come with a divider that can position either direction in the basket.  
     
    Kick Ash Basket - LINK
     
    Kick Ash Basket makes charcoal basket options for about every Kamado grill out there.  I have Kick Ash Baskets for all of my Kamado Joe grills.  I also bought several smaller sizes baskets that I use inside my Kamado Joe grills when I want to keep a smaller amount of charcoal bunched together in the larger grill.  
     
    Vacuum Sealers:
     
    I am a firm believer in the use of vacuum sealers.  They are PERFECT for storing/freezing leftovers.  There are two kinds of vacuum sealers out there.  There are Chamber Sealers and Channel Sealers.  My GO-TO right now is a chamber sealer.
     
    Avid Armor Ultra Series Chamber Vacuum Sealer - LINK
     
    This chamber sealer is priced RIGHT at $599.  I am extremely happy with mine.  I made this video walk-around demo of this sealer:  
     
     
     
    For home use, this sealer is worth your investment.  The ONLY THING I have found disappointing about this company is that their product availability comes and goes.  They don't seem to have a steady supply of inventory and these sealers are out of stock quite frequently.  They also have a channel sealer that I BELIEVE is probably well worth the $299 price tag, but I don't have one.  When it comes to channel sealers, I can just recommend sticking with the Food Saver product line.  I have had several of those and to be quite honest about it, I PREFER the cheapest one they make.  It's small and easy to use and store.  
     
    Sous Vide Circulators:
     
    I am not a huge fan of sous vide cooking.  There are a couple things I like about sous vide cooking but not nearly enough to justify the cost of the equipment in most cases.  I do, however, believe that a sous vide circulator is a must-have device if you are using a vacuum sealer to store frozen leftovers.  The cirulator is the BEST way to reheat frozen foods, especially meats, without overcooking them in the process.  Take prime rib for instance.  If I cook one and have several big slices of it leftover, I never hesitate to vacuum seal those and toss them in the freezer.  I can reheat them in a sous vide bath at 135°F for an hour or so to restore them to a medium rare temperature and they are ready to eat.  They don't get overcooked during the reheating.  I reheat frozen pulled pork, ribs, and brisket in sous vide baths at 165°F.  I have had hands on experience with three different sous vide circulators.  My favorite one is below:
     
    Anova Culinary Sous Vide Precision Cooker - LINK  
     
    There are cheaper sous vide cookers out there and feel free to buy whichever one you like.  I like THIS one because its easy to fit it on to about any kind of container you might want to use.  It's also quite intuitive to operate and it doesn't REQUIRE a smart device to control it.  I don't see wifi as a necessary tool for sous vide but, like everything else in culinary world, smart devices are taking over.  
     
    Miscellaneous Accessories:
     
    The Xapron - LINK
     

     
    (Provided to me by https://www.xapron.nl/en/)
     
    I started wearing an apron regularly several years ago.  I looked at leather aprons and couldn't find one I was willing to pay for.  The stuff I found that I liked was $300 and up.  When I discovered the Xapron, I was extremely happy.  My Xapron is the "Utah" model in the "Choco" color.  The Xapron line has models priced between $79 and $149.  Atlanta Grill Company (https://atlantagrillcomany.com) has some customization options available as well such as the towel ring and square patch you see on mine in this photo.  People ask me about how hot it gets in the summer, but I am able to wear this leather apron more comfortably in the heat than my previous canvas material apron.  
     
    Texas Canvas Wares Apron - LINK
     
    This is a $40 workshop style apron that I was wearing and quite happy with before I got the Xapron pictured above.  I like the pockets on this apron quite a bit.  
     
    Power Practical "Sparkr Wick" - LINK  
     
    This is the coolest BBQ grill lighter I have ever seen.  Windproof and never needs a refill.  It just needs an occasional battery charge with the provided USB cable.  
     
    Grease Monkey Gloves - LINK
     
    These are the red gloves you may see me wearing in videos for handling food.  I like these gloves because they are reusable for quite a while.  I wash them in the washing machine and let them air dry.  I bought at 15-pair pack of these over a year ago (as of late 2019) and I'm still using them all.  These gloves are great for food prep and for handling hot food.  They are not durable enough for handling hot pans.  I have big hands and these LARGE size fit me fine. I have only seen them available in large.
     
    Grill Beast Stainless Steel Injector - LINK
     
    I use my injector for injecting flavor blends into poultry and injecting curing brines into larger cuts of meat such as hams.  THIS one is extremely good quality at a great price.  I owned a SpitJack system also (https://amzn.to/2Nmteu1) that has some bells and whistles at a MUCH higher price point and I gave it away.  I prefer the simplicity of the simple system.  Its MUCH EASIER to load and clean than the SpitJack.  
     
    Traeger BIG Spatula - LINK
     
    This is one of my favorite grill utensils.  I use it frequently when I want to remove a butt or a brisket from the grill.  
     
    Weber STYLE Stainless Steel BBQ Tool Set - LINK
     
    This is my favorite tong/spatula set for general purpose grill use.  I bought my set about 7 years ago and they have been my go-to tools since then.  I have had no issues with them.
     
    Kuhn Rikon Vase Grinder - LINK
     
    I use two of these... one for coarse salt and another for whole peppercorns.  They work extremely well and are easy to use and clean.
     
    My Bookshelf:
     
    Rule #1 about buying cookbooks:
     
    If you are looking for recipes, use the internet.   It's free.  Any book you BUY should be a book that teaches you something about cooking and not just a collection of recipes.  When you get enough of those you will understand cooking METHODS and become able to free yourself from recipes.  I have a metric butt ton of cookbooks around here, but several of them rise to the top of the stack when I consider how much the have to offer beyond a collection of recipes.
     
    Meathead: The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling - LINK
     
    I think everyone should own this book.  This book does have a lot of great recipes in it.  This book is also packed full of the fundamental knowledge you NEED to gain understanding of everything that is happening when you cook on your grill or smoker.  This is a cover-to-cover read book.  If everyone in the BBQ and grilling community bought this one, you would quickly lose interest in most of the others out there.  
     
    Serious Barbecue - Adam Perry Lang - LINK
     
    This book is also full of outstanding recipes but I learned a lot more from this book in the form of cooking technique.  The recipes and content in this book are a little more difficult.  
     
    Michael Symon's Playing with Fire - LINK
     
    Michael Symon was one of my two favorite Iron Chefs.  This book brings some great technique and flavor profiles to your table.  
     
     
  13. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from KismetKamado in The New Fireboard 2 Pro model is finally available for purchase!   
    I have a request in to their support with a question that will make the decision as to whehter i am gonna buy one.. i will report back when i get an answer...
     
  14. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Mac in How to light a fire and get HOT QUICKLY in a Ceramic Kamado   
    on the few instances where I have taken my grill that hot, i haven't had any issue doing it with the ash drawer in place.  
  15. Thanks
    John Setzler got a reaction from Mac in How to light a fire and get HOT QUICKLY in a Ceramic Kamado   
    I still see a lot of newer kamado owners struggling to get HOT in an hurry.  This video shows you how to light up and get hot as fast as possible in a typical ceramic kamado grill.  I don't believe there is a faster way to do this that I would actually recommend.   You should be able to speed it up a little by possibly using 4 or maybe even 5 fire starters.  
     
     
  16. Thanks
    John Setzler got a reaction from Mac in Grate Temperature vs Dome Temperature   
    Here's another question that I get asked frequently:
     
    Hi John
    I was referred to you by [source deleted]. I’m very new to cooking with a KJ so trying to learn quickly.
    Most recipes call for cooking at a certain temp, presumably as shown on the KJ thermometer. Recognizing that the temp at the grate level is typically hotter by 20-50 degrees than the dome temp (which is what the thermometer is measuring ). Does the suggested cooking temp take into consideration this variation.
    I’ve heard that there’s lots of debate on the internet about this subject. Some suggest using a monitor that registers grate level temp. If so, how does one reconcile with the recipes suggested cooking temp.
    All the best,
    [Name removed]
     
    ***********
    In all MY cooking and in my recommendations to others, I use the dome temperature. The dome temperature is the most consistent temperature reading inside your kamado grill. On the occasions where I use temperature controllers to operate my grill, I still use the dome temperature as my reference. I normally clip my electronic grill temperature probe directly to the stem of the dome thermometer so it will be as close as possible. If I am unable to do that for some reason, I use the temperature controller to make my DOME thermometer read at or near my desired temperature regardless of what the digital temperature at the grate reads.
     
    Electronic probes placed directly at grate level will be inconsistent for many reasons. There are a few specific reasons that these readings are inconsistent. Electronic probes placed close to food on the grill will actually be cooled by their proximity to that food. Electronic probes placed too close to the outer edge of the grill will be heated by the hot air rising from around the heat deflectors. Food dripping grease or condensation on your probes will make their readings inconsistent. Finding the perfect balance of this can be tricky and will always, in my personal experience, be rather inconsistent. For ME, consistency is a higher value target than accuracy. 20 to 50 degrees variation at any given time in the grill is not going to make or break your cook. If it would, a majority of my cooks would be failures since I pay zero attention to any temperature at the grate level.
     
    When cooking over heat deflectors, the temperature variations you see between the dome thermometer and the grate temperature will normally stabilize and normalize when the when the lid is left closed. Frequent lid opening will keep these two readings well apart from each other.
     
    One part of being a successful grill chef is being able to tell when the food is done. Grills are, by nature, not as consistent as the average indoor oven. But Kamado grills and other computer controlled grills are challenge that idea very nicely most of the time. Your hands, eyes, and taste buds are more important tools for determining a successful cook than your thermometers and timers. Use these tools as reference only to get you CLOSE to the target. Use your human five senses to get you across the finish line 
     
    Cheers and enjoy cooking on your grill!
  17. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from JeffieBoy in Vaccinated   
    I feel much better now.  

  18. Like
  19. Like
  20. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Scott Roberts in Napoleon Kettle added to the fleet   
    I wouldn't mind having one of those Napoleon bullet smokers like the WSM.
  21. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Walrus in Vaccinated   
    That's exactly who is getting it in the first rollouts.  That's why I have it.
     
    I work in a situation where I have hands on contact with covid patients somewhere between 20 and 30 times per shift.
  22. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Walrus in Vaccinated   
    You are correct.  MOST covid patients are NOT in the hospital and NOT dying.  The problem is that you don't know if YOU are one who has an underlying condition that could be exacerbated by Covid to a life threatening situation.
  23. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Walrus in Vaccinated   
    I sorta see it the opposite way.  I'm looking at it from all points of view, but this point of view says let's vaccinate the people who are spreading the disease.  When you consider the number of infections found in assisted living facilities, they are significantly HIGH and the mortality rate is also very high at the same time.  Those people aren't getting infected because they went to Walmart without a mask.  They are getting infected by the employees coming and going from the facility as well as people coming in and out to visit them.  
     
    For what it's worth, I also don't believe there are very many relevant comparisons between the Flu and Covid-19.  How would you compare Covid to the Flu for THIS season?  I work in a hospital and we are seeing little to no flu this season.  People have stared doing simple things in their lives that will keep them clear of the flu.  Most of those things are also adequate to keep you clear of Covid.  The problem is that the flu is not as contagious as Covid.  One person who has Covid is more likely to infect more people that one who has the flu (https://www.bbc.com/news/health-52473523). 
     
    From CDC:
     
    "While COVID-19 and flu viruses are thought to spread in similar ways, COVID-19 is more contagious among certain populations and age groups than flu. Also, COVID-19 has been observed to have more superspreading events than flu. This means the virus that causes COVID-19 can quickly and easily spread to a lot of people and result in continuous spreading among people as time progresses."
     
    https://www.cdc.gov/flu/symptoms/flu-vs-covid19.htm#:~:text=While COVID-19 and flu,more superspreading events than flu.
     
    If the two virii had similar transmissibility properties, those number comparisons would be more relevant.  But even at that, Why does it make any sense to compare Covid to the Flu?  Let's just look at the COVID numbers.  Covid has been killing people all year long and not just during a 'flu season.'  It does appear to be more aggressively spreading during cooler/colder weather months, which also makes sense.  
     
    In the long run, the answer is to provide vaccines for everyone who wants one.  In the short term, we should vaccinate the appropriate people first and have the rest stay on lockdown until vaccines are available.  
     
    I don't know what the RIGHT answer is.  I just like to look at all the possibilities and juggle in my pea brain which one might be the best answer.
  24. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Brick Pig in Vaccinated   
    I sorta see it the opposite way.  I'm looking at it from all points of view, but this point of view says let's vaccinate the people who are spreading the disease.  When you consider the number of infections found in assisted living facilities, they are significantly HIGH and the mortality rate is also very high at the same time.  Those people aren't getting infected because they went to Walmart without a mask.  They are getting infected by the employees coming and going from the facility as well as people coming in and out to visit them.  
     
    For what it's worth, I also don't believe there are very many relevant comparisons between the Flu and Covid-19.  How would you compare Covid to the Flu for THIS season?  I work in a hospital and we are seeing little to no flu this season.  People have stared doing simple things in their lives that will keep them clear of the flu.  Most of those things are also adequate to keep you clear of Covid.  The problem is that the flu is not as contagious as Covid.  One person who has Covid is more likely to infect more people that one who has the flu (https://www.bbc.com/news/health-52473523). 
     
    From CDC:
     
    "While COVID-19 and flu viruses are thought to spread in similar ways, COVID-19 is more contagious among certain populations and age groups than flu. Also, COVID-19 has been observed to have more superspreading events than flu. This means the virus that causes COVID-19 can quickly and easily spread to a lot of people and result in continuous spreading among people as time progresses."
     
    https://www.cdc.gov/flu/symptoms/flu-vs-covid19.htm#:~:text=While COVID-19 and flu,more superspreading events than flu.
     
    If the two virii had similar transmissibility properties, those number comparisons would be more relevant.  But even at that, Why does it make any sense to compare Covid to the Flu?  Let's just look at the COVID numbers.  Covid has been killing people all year long and not just during a 'flu season.'  It does appear to be more aggressively spreading during cooler/colder weather months, which also makes sense.  
     
    In the long run, the answer is to provide vaccines for everyone who wants one.  In the short term, we should vaccinate the appropriate people first and have the rest stay on lockdown until vaccines are available.  
     
    I don't know what the RIGHT answer is.  I just like to look at all the possibilities and juggle in my pea brain which one might be the best answer.
  25. Like
    John Setzler got a reaction from Golf Griller in Smoked Cheez Its   
×
×
  • Create New...