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Luv2Q

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  • Content Count

    41
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Miami, Florida
  • Interests
    BBQing, photography and spending time with my family.
  • Grill
    Big Steel Keg

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1,250 profile views
  1. Hello fellow KG forum members! Last Tuesday, my wife brought home some green plantains, so I decided to make some "Mariquitas con Mojo". Although mojo typically refers to a type of marinade made with a few different ingredients, the mojo that I'm referring to here is more of a simple tangy garlic sauce. Some people get all complicated and roast their garlic and add a ton of ingredients to their mojo, but I personally think that all of that is overkill. In my opinion, simplicity is the key to a good mariquita appetizer. "Mariquitas" are crispy chips or strips made from fried green p
  2. ck, here are a couple of shots from a different year's hog cook which should show how the lid and ash strainer work on the Caja China box. In this pic, both pieces are together. Notice the two sets of carry handles on each side. In this pic, the pieces are separated and the ash is being removed. Notice that the main lid is still in place and the heat has not escaped during the ash removal process.
  3. ck, thank you! By the way, the ash actually never gets into the cooking chamber. If you look closely at the lid design, the charcoal is on a secondary strainer lid placed on top of the main, heavy gauge steel lid that seals the box. In Kamado terms, think Kick Ash Basket. You periodically lift the secondary strainer lid, shake the coals so that the ash falls into the depression in main lid left by the lifting of the secondary strainer lid, then shovel the ash into a large metal ash bucket. This completely eliminates the ash, which acts as an insulator when it's between the hot charcoal briquet
  4. Hello fellow KG forum members! Being that my parents are both Cuban and I've never had the privilege of stepping foot on the island, I have always tried to learn as much as possible from them when it comes to authentic Cuban cuisine. Since I was born and raised here in Miami, Florida, I've had almost every conceivable Cuban dish that there is. One of my favorite traditions is the Christmas Eve whole hog roast. Many, many years ago, my wife's uncle (who happens to own a metal shop) built a "Caja China" for my father using the specifications learned over the many years of trial and error
  5. BSA, the best answer I could give you is, sort of, but not exactly. I did use TQ, but I didn't use any water. I rubbed it right onto the pork belly, then added in my maple syrup into one zip-loc bag and turbinado sugar into the other. When the water is drawn out of the pork belly, it ends up looking like a brine, though obviously not as watery.
  6. Hello fellow KG forum members! Again, going through old pics, I came across these of a homemade bacon cook done from cured pork bellies. On one slab, I used maple syrup and on the other, I went with straight turbinado brown sugar. These were smoked with apple and cherry for 12 hours. After, I foiled them up and put them in the freezer for a day. After pulling them from the freezer the next day, I simply lifted off the skin. It's easier to do this now than to cut it off beforehand. Into the slicer they went. Mmmmm! BACON!!! Fortunately, I didn't h
  7. John, you're going to love this, I promise! It's easy and the results are truly satisfying. Plus, you can do sticks and flat jerky with the cannon. Even better, you can buy many different pre-packaged seasonings or make your own. Finally, the meat is another variable that you can control, so the combinations are endless. Enjoy it in good health! So these have to be refrigerated after they are made and vacuum sealed? John, even though these have cure in them, they're not fully dehydrated, so I always refrigerate them. Maybe I'm being paranoid, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.
  8. "Fauxstrami". LOL!!! I love it! Phil, on this particular cook, I went with straight CBP, nothing else. Why? I don't know. I just get in that mood sometimes. LRJ, I know that my low-'n-slow favorite temperature is 225 degrees, so that's accurate. From memory, I think I pulled this one at an IT of 195. Adder, the MES still sits in my terrace, but I haven't used it in a while because I haven't had a chance to jump on the repair of the heating element. One of the contacts came apart and I haven't ordered a replacement. One day... I'm going the bottom round route next time. The fa
  9. LOL! Leaving rock-hard frozen chicken in a bowl covered with plastic wrap is my wife's way of letting me know that I'm doing the cooking that night. Team, I actually chose to do them direct for this cook, so I left the diffuser out. I laid the strips on the grate when the grill hit 350, but I did open up four times to brush and flip them all, so that took some time away from the overall cook time and lowered the average temperature quite a bit. My thought for leaving the diffuser out was to get a slightly crispy exterior while trying not to burn the sauce. I left the grate on the upper p
  10. John, you're going to love this, I promise! It's easy and the results are truly satisfying. Plus, you can do sticks and flat jerky with the cannon. Even better, you can buy many different pre-packaged seasonings or make your own. Finally, the meat is another variable that you can control, so the combinations are endless. Enjoy it in good health!
  11. Hello fellow KG forum members! I was digging through my old pics tonight and ran across a Pastrami cook that I did some time ago. For those who have never attempted making Pastrami, YOU MUST TRY THIS! I started off with two packs of corned beef brisket. I soaked the briskets in water for a while to remove the salty brine. Here they are, all dried up and seasoned with freshly cracked coarse black pepper. I mixed pellets in the AMNPS, but I honestly can't remember what woods I used. Here they are, almost ready to be pulled out. Here they are, pulled out a
  12. Well, I just found a few more "before" pics for a snack stick project that I had done. Here they are: This pic shows the ball of ground beef mixed with the seasoning and the cure right before it went into the jerky gun. This pic just looks cool, in my opinion. Here are the extruded ropes of mixed ground beef laid out on one of the smoker's shelves and that's the jerky gun next to it. I apologize for the late entry, but it seems as though I'm getting sloppy with my image archiving. Thanks for looking and enjoy the pics!
  13. I used lean ground beef (93%/7%) for this particular batch. You can use ground beef from the store or you can grind your own. This decision is completely up to you, but it's recommended that you do use lean ground beef. Thanks. Thought that might have been your approach. Guess I really need to con my brother out of some more venison. I can hear the discussion now.... yeah you can have the deer meat but I want half the snack sticks... Works for me! BTW -- the instructions are on-line: https://www.himtnjerky.com/instructions/Instr_Jerky.pdf https://www.himtnjerky.com/
  14. I used lean ground beef (93%/7%) for this particular batch. You can use ground beef from the store or you can grind your own. This decision is completely up to you, but it's recommended that you do use lean ground beef. After tearing up the place, I finally came across the instructions that came with the Hi-Mountain Jerky package. They are, as follows: • For every pound of ground meat, they state to add 2.5 teaspoons of their jerky seasoning and 2 teaspoons of their cure. • To this mixture, they state to add 0.25 cup of ice water per pound of ground meat. • They state to mix thes
  15. Thank you for the compliments, folks! Wicked, I used up all of the teriyaki sauce on the chicken or I would've definitely drenched that rice with it!
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