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Jordan

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    21
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About Jordan

  • Birthday 07/18/1988

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Old Town, ME
  • Grill
    Akorn
  1. I got it from my mom too... as it turns out, I didn't really need it... it's the recipe on the back of the bag of beans! I wish I had an old bean crock too. My mother has one my grandmother passed down to her so I'm hoping I'll get it eventually!
  2. After an additional 45 minutes with some Sweet Baby Rays, here they are:
  3. Cooked them for 2.5 hours over indirect heat, then wrapped them in foil for 1 hour: Here's what the two pork rubbed racks looked like after 3.5 hours of cooking on the bottom grate: And here's what the one applewood rubbed rack looked like after 3.5 hours of cooking on the accessory grate: Just put them back on basted with some Hickory & Brown Sugar BBQ sauce and I'm thinking I'll go another 45 mins or so. I'll try to get a picture when fished before the guys destroy them, they're so frustrated right now with the awesome smells in the office!
  4. Thanks! I'm a sucker for good baked beans too, these go perfectly with about any smoked meat!
  5. Traditional New England Baked Beans: - 2lbs State of Maine Yellow Eyed Beans - 1 yellow onion - quartered - 1/2 lb Salt Pork - 1/4 cup Sugar - 2/3 cup Molasses - 2 tsp Dry/Ground Mustard - 1/2 tsp Black Pepper - Dash of Salt Pick through the beans for small pebbles/rocks and put them in a big bowl. Cover with cold water and let them soak overnight. In the morning, boil the beans in a big pot until you can blow on them and the skin splits easily. Transfer the beans to a baking dish or a crock pot (your choice) and add the quartered onion. Add to the beans the sugar, molasses, dry mustard, pepper, and salt pre-mixed with a pint (2 cups) of boiling water. If the mixture doesn't cover the beans, add more boiling water to cover. Cut 1/2 way through the rind of the salt pork in several places and put it in with the beans. If baking, bake at 300F for six hours, if in crock pot, put on high for six hours or until done to your desired tenderness.
  6. Third cook: Brought the Akorn to the office today to smoke some baby back ribs for the guys. We're all close friends and are about to start traveling away from the office quite a lot in the next few weeks so it's good to have a big feast to keep the morale up. Got here at 6:30 a.m. and got everything started up and the ribs put on at 7:45. Rubbed two racks with a standard pork rub and one with an applewood rub. Cooking at 225F currently, I'm thinking I'll pull them at 2.5 hrs and wrap them in foil for about 1.5 hours then put them back on the smoker and baste them for 20ish mins or so. Totally experimenting since I cooked St. Louis style ribs last time. Here's to hoping they come out well! Plenty more pictures to ensue.
  7. Thanks! I didn't take any last night, but I've got the second rack at work for lunch today, I'll snag a picture here in a bit!
  8. I hadn't found this website until about a week after I got my Kamado... by that time I had already ponied up and bought the Char-Griller smoking stone from Amazon. It was a tad pricey, but when it came in I was surprised to see how robust (thick) it was. In the end, I'm happy with my purchase. I'd try either the Weber grill replacement/pizza pan method if you're on a budget, or the Char-Griller smoking stone.
  9. Wow, yours came out AWESOME! That looks delicious and the rub/brine recipes sound tasty as well.
  10. I figured chicken would be a good place to start, they definitely came out to my liking! I'm loving my Akorn as well! I'm thinking you're absolutely right! Thanks for the tips on the chunk wood, I went to Home Depot to get charcoal and wood and they were out of Applewood chunks so I had to resort to chips... definitely going to try some chunks next cook, though! Thank you! The only reason they came out so well is because I did a LOT of reading before hand from this very forum! Thanks for the advice. The skin was not quite as crispy as I would've liked so I'll definitely try it at an elevated temp next time. If all u have is chips, what you could do is get a good amount and put them in a sealed foil pouch with holes on top n place directly on the charcoals. I've used this same technique for the same reason that Wal-Mart didn't have cherry chunks. Thanks for the tip on smoking with chips! Thanks guys! The chickens were my FIRST cook on the Akorn and like you, I was only used to "regular" grilling. I followed John Setzler on YouTube and his videos helped immensely! Yours should come out great, this cooker makes us look good!
  11. Week two and I think I'm getting the hang of this! St. Louis ribs rubbed with pork rub and smoked over hickory at 225F for 6 hours using the 3-2-1 method. These are amazing! Made some homemade New England baked beans to go along with them.
  12. I figured chicken would be a good place to start, they definitely came out to my liking! I'm loving my Akorn as well! I'm thinking you're absolutely right! Thanks for the tips on the chunk wood, I went to Home Depot to get charcoal and wood and they were out of Applewood chunks so I had to resort to chips... definitely going to try some chunks next cook, though! Thank you! The only reason they came out so well is because I did a LOT of reading before hand from this very forum! Thanks for the advice. The skin was not quite as crispy as I would've liked so I'll definitely try it at an elevated temp next time.
  13. Thanks for the tips! It ended up coming out well, super moist and great flavor! Next up, ribs!
  14. Hi all! I finally had a day at home today after getting my new Char-Griller Akorn last week and decided to give it a try! I just put on two - four pound chickens to roast at 325F. I brined them this morning for four hours and injected a mixture of butter, Applewood rub, garlic powder, and onion powder under the skin. I also put more rub on the outside of the chickens. One is on a beer can stand and one is just on the cooking grate. Cooking with some Royal Oak lump charcoal and a handful of Applewood chips with the smoking stone in place for indirect heat. Hoping they come out okay! Looking to pull them off at 165F as read by my Ivation digital thermometer! More photos to come soon, any tips for this newbie in the interim are appreciated!
  15. Thank you! I totally agree, Down East Maine is very beautiful. If you ever get the chance, Central and Northern Maine can be just as great!
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