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Charles Wagon

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Posts posted by Charles Wagon

  1. I believe you need to heat cure refractory cement, at least a Rutland product that I used in my fireplace required heat curing. The instructions said to apply, let dry for a day, pre-cure at 200F for some amount of time, and then cure at 500F for some other amount of time. Cured rock solid for me. 

  2. 3 hours ago, Webber_Grills said:

    I'm with you on preferring to have non-meat meals that are that way "on purpose" rather than imitating a meat meal

     

    But, we have vegetarian friends who are glad for having better options of "mock meats" for things like group get togethers - if only so they don't have to stand out as different, and they can also just scarf down a couple of burgers like anyone else rather than being limited to sides and salads

     

    I get that. 

     

    They also explained that "mock meats" tend to be the more social dishes, since there are a lot of people who want to "pass" at a backyard bbq, but not so many who want to pretend at home with the rest of their meals

    Hmmm. Interesting points that hadn’t occurred to me. Thanks for this perspective!

  3. On 3/15/2021 at 9:41 AM, len440 said:

    One last rambling thought we are at the top of the food chain only if we stay out of the woods with bears. 

     

    what about the sharks? or the lions?

     

    we may be near the top of the food chain, but a tiny irukandji jellyfish can kill an adult human. And, as we've all learned over the last year, that a simple virus (which is barely in the category of a life form and some debate that it is not a life form and merely a biological chemical) has the capability of wiping out an entire civilization.

     

    Back to topic of impossible meat, I haven't tried it and have no desire to do so. If placed in front of me, I'd probably try it out of curiosity. Given the choice between a fresh home-made veggie burger (with visible chunks of beans, carrots, rice, oats, onion, peppers, etc.) and any meat-based burger, I'd go for the veggie burger every time. My preference is to celebrate the vegetables rather than try to make a plant-based meal taste like a meat-based meal. YMMV, of course.

  4. 8 hours ago, kurwaslobo said:

    Does DoJoe works in high temperatures or does it take some damage, i mean temperatures like 450c-500/ 840F to 930F?

     

    As others have mentioned, it says not to exceed 700*F. That being said, I'm not even sure that you could exceed that stated limit, even if you tried. (Well, I guess if you really, really tried, you could easily exceed 700*F; I mean under regular/normal conditions of typical lump charcoal, naturally aspirated...). I've fired up my Classic I with the DoJoe, with a full basket of lump (RO or KJ), bottom vent wide open, top vent closed, basically according to normal conditions, and the dome temp never exceeded about 650F. I think its design prevents getting up to the 450-500C/840-930F range.

     

    Those temps are in the Neapolitan range, and there are much better tools than the DoJoe. It really is not up to that task.

  5. A soak in an equal mix of white vinegar and water should go a long way in removing/dissolving the rust. Then, go at it with mechanical scrubbing.

     

    Here's a good resource on cast iron cleaning:

    https://www.castironcollector.com/cleaning.php

     

    If this is the fire grate, I don't see the point in seasoning it, or actually, even spending too much time on rust removal. In the firebox, any seasoning would likely be burned right off, leaving bare cast iron, which will rust again.

     

    A high temp cook off will cook off any seasoning on the fire grate, or other cast iron surfaces.

     

     

  6. I agree with @John Setzlerthat the ooni is a one-trick-pony and is pretty much limited to pizza. Ooni does claim that their ovens are more versatile, but they are on the small side (the Oono Karu, which is what I have, can’t handle anything bigger than a 12” pizza) and have a pretty short (height-wise) “mouth”). I can’t comment on pellet-fed soot issues, since the Karu is wood/coal-fed or gas-fed, with an optional propane burner. I don’t have soot problems with either wood/lump or gas (obviously, for the latter).

     

    when I bought the ooni.m, I did not have space for a full-blown wfo. So, I had to accept the limitations of a portable/table-top unit. My household is just two people, so I can live with the 12” max pizza size of the Karu and the convenience of being ready to go within 15 minutes of firing up the Karu, as opposed to an hour for a full-blown wfo, especially for just one pizza per cook. If I were feeding a larger family or regularly hosting pizza parties, I’d probably go another route than an ooni or similar unit. 
     

    all this being said, I must say that the ooni makes a dang good pizza!
     

    balancing your needs, lifestyle, space, budget, etc. is all part of the equation

     

    good luck and keep us posted!
     

     

  7. 3 hours ago, adm said:

    I would say you are correct with this. I can make excellent "Nearlypolitan" pizza on my Kamado, but it's not the perfect tool for the job. I don't have a DoJoe type accessory, so the continual opening and closing of the dome to make Neapolitan style pies is a pain in the ### to be honest. And it uses a lot of fuel to get to the right temperature.

    My $200 Ooni Karu nails it though - just with a few bits of kindling wood and 60-90 seconds. I would highly recommend it as a cheap, dedicated pizza tool. My plan is also to use it to make perfect Naan and Pitta breads, while cooking meat on the Kamado.


    IMG_5419.thumb.jpeg.0c571fb62c06ee9c3cede102b95c46d2.jpeg
     

     

    Your pizza looks great, @adm! I bit better than mine. For some reason, I can't get my cheese quite as cooked as I would like. In other words, like yours. I usually use BelGioioso thin-sliced fresh mozzarella but occasionally use a store-made fresh mozz. Maybe the broccoli interferes. I dunno.

  8. I have a DoJoe for my classic I.

     

    It is a good addition and can produce great results but is definitely not going to get you anywhere close to temp for Neapolitan pizza. It's just the wrong tool for the job.

     

    If you're quest is Neapolitan pizza, an Ooni or Roccbox would have been a better investment. I have an Ooni Karu and have not cooked pizza on the KJ since getting the Karu.

     

     

    IMG_0164.jpeg

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