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kaybee

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kaybee last won the day on May 8 2017

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  • Location:
    Ottawa, Ontario
  • Grill
    Big Green Egg

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  1. Many thanks!! Now that I'm back inside for the season (my dog and I practically lived outside the whole summer), sitting down and writing forum posts is more feasible for me. I certainly plan to be posting more here. I have actually been struggling a bit with Twitter and the amount of detail about a cook that I can provide. Also, it seems people on Twitter are more about the final food shot than the cook. So I'm planning on essentially doing the 'teasers' on Twitter and the cook details in this forum. I participate in a few BBQ related forums and this is the one I think has the best balance of level of activity, enthusiasm for the Q, general helpfulness and civility. I thought about another forum (nameless but it goes strange on Friday nights and spends WAY too much time on double edge razors - if you read that forum you know which one I'm taking about). I decided I did not want the Twitter stuff linked to that forum because of the odd stuff. I can take a joke as well as the rest of them and often find said forum hilarious, it just not one I really want my digital presence directly linked to. Long way of saying, I plan to do exactly what you want and 'grace' you with many more posts in the upcoming months. Please keep in mind for the future that you ASKED for this Thanks again for the encouragement and comments on the Twitter side of things, it's a bit chaotic as I have many interests and I'm retired so I have the time to get myself into trouble often. Those moments tend to show up on Twitter.
  2. One of the things about the Trompo is the fact that you can cook/roast things in the tray as well as whatever is on the spike. The foil interferes with that as I found the juices just went underneath the foil and burned. It actually cleans up pretty easily and well and as long as you don't do anything stupid (ahem, Trompo cook #2 - Pineapple Chicken or How to do Practically Everything Wrong and Still Get a Great Stack, not yet posted but it will be today or tomorrow. Let's just say I tried to add a side of Lessons Learned to the first cook and it pretty much turned into an unmitigated disaster resulting in my Trompo's first encounter with the EZ Off. Third time was the charm though (another post to finish). I was so insulted by something calling itself a Blade Simmering Steak (who in the 'HE'-double hockey sticks simmers a STEAK?) that I had to buy it and see if I could turn it into something edible with the Trompo. This is my type of BBQ. Take cheap cuts/stuff and make it easy better with application of heat and smoke. Sure I like me some Wagyu or dry aged beef but that is the stuff you pull out for special occasions, not everyday. So I walk by grocery sales of family packs of chicken breast, 1/4-1/2” thick pork chops, steaks, etc. and think to myself, wish I could use that stuff more, way cheaper than making sure every steak is at least 3/4" thick for a reverse sear, ... The Trompo seems to be the solution to this for me. I have done three cooks on it in three days which I think it's a record for a new piece of gear. Each cook has used what I would normally consider 'crap meat'. And I'm getting great result, even the failures. I haven't done this yet but I also think Trompo leftovers may turn out to be one of those things you turn the freezer upside down looking for. I plan to thaw/reheat some pineapple chicken in the sous vide and then serve with rice and maybe braised baby bok choy. Due to the in-juice cook provided by the sous vide, I think that will result in the taste you really want but never get when you order pineapple chicken somewhere fast like a food court where you generally just get a mushy mess. I can almost see doing a cook just for the leftovers.
  3. Additional notes to recipe: 8. I estimate the amount of meat/other that I packed on the 7" spike would feed 4-6 easily with sides. The 12" would likely feed 8-10. 9. I vac sealed and froze the leftovers. Plan to thaw/cook with the sous vide at 120 (cook part at least an hour). Should soften up onion and pineapple (freezing, long steady temp). It should also result in some pretty awesome jus to go with it.
  4. You're going to feel silly but it's: https://trompoking.com I got mine from Dickson Barbecue Centre by web purchase as I live in Canada (thus the pineapple comments). I can't stress my satisfaction with these folks enough. I have been dealing with them for a couple of years and every purchase has been a pleasure. Any errors have been corrected quickly, at no cost and usually with me being the beneficiary of the error (ex. they sent me the regular version of a Dizzy Pig rub instead of salt free. Let them know and within 24 hours I had the correct rub and got to keep the regular. The salt free was for a neighbour. Double Bonus!! I likely would have never bought that particular rub as it is for seafood generally but I'm sure I'll be using it on something in the very near future). I have a couple of more similar experiences of service above the norm but usually shipments are just fast and error free. If you live in Canada and buy BBQ stuff over the web, you owe it to yourself to check them out. They are also the only Eastern Canada dealer I am aware of for a few rubs like the Hardcore Carnivore line and the Dizzy Pig limited/special edition rubs. https://dicksonbbq.com
  5. Having (like many of you I expect) tried stacked meat by putting a skewer in an onion, then stacking everything in a pan and carrying the whole precarious mess out to the Q, I was caught in a weak moment and bought a Trompo King. I need many more weak moments like this! This thing is awesome, good enough to justify its admittedly high price. Tank-like construction (I used to be a military contractor working on armoured vehicles, I do not use this term lightly), commercial stainless steel, very, very heavy gauge. Solid handles. Two screw in spikes (7" and 12") and believe it or not, with the short spike fits into a Medium Egg, which makes it one of the very few specialty accessories I have found that does. Cleans up moderately easily but I used a high sugar marinade with the Trompo directly on a low grate which is probably as bad as it gets. Next cook will be on an upside down plate setter. I think I may also be able to use it as a lipped griddle without the spike which would corral small cut ingredients almost like a flat wok and also would likely make some pretty awesome smashburgers. This thing is Highly Recommended. Food! Food! We want food! OK - Here's something I just totally made up (great idea for a first cook, eh?): Korean-ish Beef on the Trompo King (7" spike) 2 lb Sirloin Tip Roast, cut in 1/4" slices 3-4 slices pineapple, cut 1/4-1/2" thick (see notes) 3-4 slices white onion, cut 1/4-1/2" thick, end of onion saved for base of stack (see notes) Portobello Mushroom (optional see notes) Marinade: 2 heaping Tbsp Gochuchang Juice from 2 oranges (Blood oranges if you can get them) 1 full Star Anise 2 Tbsp Szechuan Peppercorns 1-2 large clove garlic, rough chop 1” knob of ginger, rough chop Directions: 1. Make marinade. Toast anise and peppercorns until fragrant. Grind. Combine all marinade ingredients in mini food processor and let 'er rip. Combine marinade and beef in ZipLoc and refrigerate 4-24 hrs. 2. Get smoker going 325-350. If you have the height clearance, I would use a platesetter legs down. If you don't, use it legs up. I didn't use a smoke wood, just lump. 3. Make the stack. Start with the reserved onion end, sliced side up to keep the meat (mostly) from direct contact with pan. It also serves as a useful slicing stop so you don't drag your knife point on the pan when slicing for serving. See notes for additional detail. Then just stack the meat, onion, pineapple and portobello (if using) in sequences of a few slices of meat, a slice of something else, ... repeat until hit top of spike or run out of ingredients. Press down firmly as you add the layers. 4. Put on smoker. Add veggies for roasting if making. Cook stack until internal probe reads the temp you like for your beef 'doneness'. I went to 120 and liked the results although I may try 115 next time but I like my beef pretty rare. Don't forget to flip veggies occasionally which is the only reason to open the smoker during the cook. See notes for temp probing. See notes for untested (currently) technique variation. 5. Slice and serve!! Notes: 1. I used 'fresh' pineapple as much as that is possible in November in Ottawa but I think canned would actually work better due to the additional juice soaking (extra juice could also be used instead of orange juice but I like the contrast). 2. Adjust the thickness of your onion slices for how sharp you like your onion to taste. I made this with 1/2" slices and it was too sharp for me. Same applies to the pineapple, you can adjust the impact on the taste by slice thickness. 3. The Portobello did not fit into the taste profile of the other things. I ended up separating it out and eating it as a side, where it was absolutely delicious and somehow 'worked' as a separate dish. I think this was a chew texture thing and a thinner mushroom might give a different result. Need to solve it for steak, mushroom and onion subs so expect an update shortly . 4. Watch your roast veggies if you do them. I was so busy paying attention to the meat that I forgot to turn them until halfway through the cook and got some pretty scorched sides. Using the platesetter should help with this too. 5. The Trompo joined my official herd of BBQ tools by making me bleed or burning me at this point. I managed to jam my thumb on the spike when putting the onion 'base' on thus resulting in a quick trip to the bathroom for bandaids. Be careful! 6. I was very surprised to find that testing at random points all around/through the stack with my instant read thermometer pretty much matched what the single controller meat probe was reading. The meat stack is so dense you can just probe it as if it was a single piece of meat. 7. It may be worth trying this with sort of a reverse sear approach. Cook low (225-250) until probing 10-20 below desired temp and then kick up the heat to complete the exterior. I think I would be tempted to do this to about 20 below desired IT and not bother taking the stack out, just open up all the vents and let 'er go until desired IT. Not sure of the affect on roasted veggies though (probably not good as they need higher temp for longer period to 'fluff'). I will be testing this (and the platesetter) tonight when I do a chicken stack of BS breasts that I pounded with DP Tsunami Spin. It would be safe to assume there will be another post on that cook but I won't go into the details on the Trompo King. Pics: Just going on the fire: About halfway through: About to come off the smoker: Inside: Slice, slice, slice: Just on a small untoasted sub roll for no taste distraction, it worked. I may never make traditional shredded beef again! Thanks for looking!! Sorry for the scarcity of posts lately. My limited social side has been coming out more on Twitter lately. (@kaybee335/kaybeeque if anyone is interested, lots of cooking but a mess of other interests too. You have been warned!)
  6. Next time I'll start at 375 rather than 325 and adjust cook time accordingly. I was so worried about the tortillas burning that they ended up too soft/rubbery. Will only be able to do so much though given the amount of liquid in the veggies.
  7. It's food grade (whatever that may mean) activated charcoal powder made from coconut hulls. I got this stuff which is likely a lifetime supply: Coconut Activated Charcoal Powder - Food Grade - Teeth Whitening, Facial Scrub, Soap Making (1lb) (0.454kg) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0763F6DD8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_dIDEBbVPG25Y1 It is really just cosmetic, it has no taste component. I also tried to use as little as possible but still get the deep black colour to the garlic/onion powder. I did read a rub recipe where the person just ground regular charcoal but I decided I wasn't up for that.
  8. Gotta say it was the tastiest flank steak I have ever cooked.
  9. I have been interested in playing around with edible charcoal ever since I tried Hardcore Carnivore Black from Jess Pryles. I say try, but somehow try turned into a 7.5 pound jug of the stuff in my cold cupboard. Anyway, I used it edible charcoal in a rub that was a bit of a riff on a pastrami rub with juniper berry, smoked Scorpion and Mole peppers from the garden last year, the edible charcoal and a few other ingredients. It turned out pretty well on first tasting without putting it on anything so it was time for a test cook and a reverse seared flank steak seemed to be a good idea. Here it is just going on the grill for the smoke at 225 (cherry wood for the smoke). After hitting a 105 internal. Just look at that meat sweat!! Then the sear on the Grill Grates. I love these things for searing and general griddle work. Better have some veggies with that. Tomatillos and chard from the garden. Melted garlic oregano infused ghee for the 'oil'. Time to slice. More pics to follow but rub was a success, this steak reminded me of that succulent fatty taste you get from the best brisket which I certainly wasn't expecting from a lean flank steak.
  10. And here it is ready to come out after about 45 minutes (last 10-15 mins at 425 for browning). I then took it off the grill and covered it with foil to let the cheese set. Continuing the fridge purge and tomatillo invasion taming, I sliced a watermelon into two thick (3/4-1") slices and sprinked lightly with the new rub. I also halved about 4 tomatillos. Dropped the grill to the firebox and put the Grill Grates ridged side up and let things get REALLY hot. Charred the tomatillos and watermelon slices on the hot grill until just softening and then removed. Chopped the watermelon and tomatillos into 1/4-1/2" chunks and mixed with sliced shallot, sliced jalapeno/cubanelle pepper, lime juice and a little salt. TaDa!! Quesadilla Pie with Charred Watermelon Tomatillo Salsa! Overall I'm really happy with this new rub I have concocted although it does still need some fine tuning (I would like to drop the amount of salt used for one). Thanks for looking!! Soffit-flower Tax:
  11. And here it is plated with the greens and some griddle fried baby potatoes. Next morning.... Realise the leftover situation in the fridge is approaching critical mass not to mention having a garden full of ripe vegetables. So what the heck, lets make something up. I call this monstrisity Quesadilla Pie and it has about 8 tortillas, a pound of cheese, too many types leftover grilled vegetables to mention, fresh cherry tomato, plum tomato, tomatilloes and herbs from the garden as well as the last of the flank steak cut into pieces, Just built it up layer by layer, this is the third layer with steak, cherry tomatoes, fresh oregano and gilled onion, Nearly done... There we go, ready to bake at 325. 15 minute check to make sure things aren't drying out/burning. Looking good. More to follow....
  12. I have been interested in playing around with edible charcoal ever since I tried Hardcore Carnivore Black from Jess Pryles. I say try, but somehow try turned into a 7.5 pound jug of the stuff in my cold cupboard. Anyway, I used it edible charcoal in a rub that was a bit of a riff on a pastrami rub with juniper berry, smoked Scorpion and Mole peppers from the garden last year, the edible charcoal and a few other ingredients. It turned out pretty well on first tasting without putting it on anything so it was time for a test cook and a reverse seared flank steak seemed to be a good idea. Here it is just going on the grill for the smoke at 225 (cherry wood for the smoke). After hitting a 105 internal. Just look at that meat sweat!! Then the sear on the Grill Grates. I love these things for searing and general griddle work. Better have some veggies with that. Tomatillos and chard from the garden. Melted garlic oregano infused ghee for the 'oil'. Time to slice. More pics to follow but rub was a success, this steak reminded me of that succulent fatty taste you get from the best brisket which I certainly wasn't expecting from a lean flank steak.
  13. This one looks interesting as a quick appetizer... http://www.meatwave.com/blog/grilled-tteokbokki-spicy-korean-rice-cakes-recipe
  14. I'm watching, I'm watching! Thanks for tagging me on this @KismetKamado
  15. That looks amazing! Consider the request for the marinade seconded! Also the pretty please!
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