Jump to content

Rip

Members Plus
  • Content Count

    214
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Rip

  1. I have one of these hats. It's sturdy and lightweight. They have a good selection of other styles, too. I spent the first 20 years of my working career outside as long as it wasn't pouring rain or too icy to stand up. So far - no problems - and I'm gonna try to keep it that way. https://bigbendsaddlery.com/product/two-dot/
  2. Hanging out in cool mountain streams...
  3. Rip

    Shut down time

    My opinion...I think we expect too much from these grills - especially new out-of-the box. Ten years ago when I got my Bubba Keg, information was not as plentiful on Kamado Cookers as it is now. Fortunately there was a forum for Bubba Keg Grills and I gleaned what I could from them. My Bubba had some shut down, temp holding and smoke leaking issues when it was new. The advice was to seal up around both vents, which helped a great deal. The next step - as I was advised - was to go to the butcher and get some unsellable Pork scraps and cook them to seal up any other small leaks during the cooking process.. Cooking the Pork scraps did help some more but ultimately it took several months of semi-reglar bugers, butts and steaks before I considered it "really close" to leak proof. During that break in period I learned a lot about the grill. I don't keep my grill squeaky clean. I need the "seasoning" to prevent leaks. When I do a cleaning - usually when the pressure washer is nearby - I give it a short blast to knock of the bigger stuff, but try not to disturb the areas around the gasket and the vents. These grills are built to tolerances as close as can be attained with ceramic or steel within reason($) - but they aren't rocket ships. The best advice I got from that forum was "learn YOUR grill" they're all "individuals". Have patience - don't worry if your grill doesn't shut down as quickly as someone else - even if it's the same grill. Charcoal, weather, the length of the cook and other factors might influence your cool down. Have fun - eat good...your grill takes time to develop its own personality. Edit to add: I'm only relaying the advice I was given and my experience - not suggesting there's not different or better ways...except for the "Have fun - eat good" part.
  4. Collard Sandwiches are a "thing" in Eastern NC. But they're good anywhere and even in the very local area where they're popular there are several variations. However you like them - eat more of them - Collards are one of the most nutritious foods in the world! https://myhome.unctv.org/the-original-collard-sandwich/
  5. All the advantages of an Akorn, but more better... https://broilkingbbq.com/grills/keg/
  6. Rip

    Rain caps

    That looks much better than the conglomeration I came up with years ago....an old pot lid bolted to a colander....
  7. Depending on how much space you have, you could get a metal table, a piece of "yard art" or a length of heavy steel pipe - something clunky and heavy to padlock a chain to...Anything that would make the grill and weight undesirable to pick up and run with. Crooks are lazy, I don't think they're going to steal anything that's gonna be noisy and/or heavy or hard to carry.
  8. I keep a can of cooking oil spray by the grill. I try to remember to spray the CI grate lightly before each cook and again after it cools off if I've gone into "high" range. When I brush the grate down, I spray it. I've only "formally" seasoned it a couple of times in the 8-9 years I've used it. In my opinion, A CI grill grate doesn't need the care that one would want to give a fine old cast iron skillet. Keep it clean, spray it and cook on it. That's what I do...
  9. I own both. Like Lunchman, I bought a Bubba Keg about the same time he did from Home Depot. About 2 years ago I bought an Akorn to use at my camper. Comparing the two is difficult for me because I've obviously not used the Akorn as much as the Keg. I've kept both grills covered and/or under a shelter the entire time. My Keg has been well used and is showing its age - cosmetically. I haven't had any problems with rust or anything else for that matter. It's still going strong and is used weekly. I still have all the original grates and accessories. The Akorn is a good grill, although as you mention, it lacks the fit and finish of the Keg. I can't make it cook like I can on my Keg. I attribute that to not having the years of experience on the Akorn that I have on my Keg. I will say that because of the quality of the fit and finish on the Keg vs. the Akorn it's easier for me to use. I suspect the Keg is better insulated than the Akorn. I've never owned a ceramic Kamado style grill. Maybe I will some day. But if I had to replace my Keg, I'd be hard pressed not to replace it with a newer version BKK based on my experience and satisfaction with my Bubba Keg. Good Luck.
  10. This is my biggest problem with many local eating establishments. There's little - to no - consistency in the products they offer. It's like whoever is running the kitchen, at any given time, brings their own recipes. Another thing that I notice, is when a new restaurant opens locally ( a big deal in a small town), they appear to use the best quality ingredients initially and eventually start settling for lower quality. That's why I do more and more cooking at home...
  11. I've been using a large 2" deep cake pan as a diffuser for years. I put an inch +/- of playground sand (50# bag from the local Lowes or Home Depot is less than $5.00), the sand is a great diffuser and absorbs drippings. When the cook is done I toss the sand.
  12. I had to look at this a little closer. Your "Maryland" location, the Lefty name and the small photo had me hoping the old coach was sharing some secret recipes. I always liked Lefty D. I'd still try the sauce, tho...
  13. I agree with this 100%. All the interactions regarding undelivered, faulty or misrepresented merchandise I've had with Amazon were dealt with immediately, with few questions asked. In most cases Amazon was just the middleman, but they still made good on the transaction. However... Since KJ was contacted first, why can't they do the same thing? Although this is undoubtedly a freak occurrence, there's no question this grill should not have left the factory. KJ is ultimately responsible for the manufacturing of their products - and their customer service. Photos, measuring and having to replace faulty parts would be out of the question for me. Who's responsible if you crack the new dome during a replacement installation you shouldn't have had to do in the first place? I'd ask for a brand new unit or a full refund. No more - no less.
  14. This makes me wonder if someone got a KJ Classic II with 2 thermometers in it...?
  15. Throw a butt on it for a low and slow cook. All the gunk you cleaned out of it was helping to seal it. It may take a couple of cooks, but it will tighten up. It needs re-gunking.
  16. I don't have a hinge on mine. But I do have a utility hook mounted on the inside of the lid so I can hang the lid on the lip of the barrel when I open it. Like this... but smaller.
  17. Yes, it did seem that this pan had an inordinate amount of warnings and explanations. I did a little research to refresh my memory on these "P" substances. I concluded that, for my purposes and habits, I could use this pan safely. It will probably never go in the oven - even though it should be safe up to a certain temperature - and I have no birds in the house. Thanks for highlighting this for any potential buyers. "Caveat Emptor"
  18. I'd like to hear your opinion if you do. I will say that I have managed to put a couple of small scratches on the cooking surface. I attribute them to sloppy handling when I put it away in an overcrowded drawer with my CI pans.
  19. I've been using this for a couple of months. It's well made, heavy and super-slick. Takes heat slowly, seems to disperse it evenly. I have not had it in the oven It's the only pan I've ever had of this composition, so I have nothing to compare it to... I would buy it again. https://www.amazon.com/Ozeri-Professional-Ceramic-Earth-Germany/dp/B07BFL94M1/ref=sr_1_7?keywords=ozeri+frying+pan&qid=1548173270&sr=8-7
  20. I agree that learning to control temps with the vents only is the best way to understand a grill. Probably 90% of my cooks are done that way. But sometimes I get comfort in having a little insurance. As simple as it is, a Pitmaster IQ110 has served me well for several years. It's not "connected" to anything but the grill. I rarely use it except on overnight low & slow cooks for peace of mind.. Good luck with your decision.
  21. I've found that the best BBQ sauce in NC is served on the side....
×
×
  • Create New...