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Chasdev

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Posts posted by Chasdev


  1. I've had an offset stick burner and still have a pellet burner, several Webers large and small plus a 24 inch Kamado and my Masterbuilt 560 puts them all to shame.

    I don't care about longevity, I've done at least a dozen cooks now using both lump and briquets and the combination of both cooked meat quality and ease of use are unsurpassed.

    I prefer the smaller 560, I cook for two max and rarely need all the cook space the 560 provides.

    If mine breaks down and I can't fix it, I will buy another.


  2. On 5/14/2020 at 10:18 PM, DEW said:

    I am thinking about adding this to my collection but given the electronics need to figure out an outdoor storage solution (no shed) 

     

    Masterbuilt sells a very well made cover.

    Here's my new cover right out of the package, it relaxed and lost the wrinkles in a day or two.

    DSC00418.JPG


  3. On 5/15/2020 at 6:00 PM, Collin said:

    @len440 @endou_kenji @fbov 

     

    Here’s the exact process I’ve been using lately:

    1. Fill the firebox with enough KJ Big Block to last the whole cook. For small roasts it might only be a few handfuls, for brisket almost a full firebox. Tumbleweed fire starter goes right in the middle, nestled down a bit.
    2. Place one fist-sized chunk of wood (hickory, oak, pecan or apple) in the middle, right next to the fire starter. This ensures the wood lights at the very beginning.
    3. Light the tumbleweed. Bottom vent open, leave lid open about 5 mins for charcoal to get going.
    4. Once it’s lit, close the lid and open top vent to first mark. Reduce bottom vent to about 2” until smoker comes up to temperature. At this point we usually have lots of billowing white smoke from the hardwood.
    5. Once grill reaches 225, reduce bottom vent to about 1/2”. Adjust if needed to keep stable temp.
    6. Leave smoker alone until the white smoke has cleared completely. With one wood chunk, this usually takes 30-45 mins from initial light. I suspect that by this point, the wood has been practically consumed.
    7. When smoke has cleared, put meat on grill.
    8. Close lid, leave it alone until finished cooking. Sometimes I wrap, sometimes not.

    That's pretty much it! I've tried lots of variations, but this seems to follow most advice I've seen.

     

    Some other notes:

    • Moving from RO to KJ Big Block was a slight improvement I think. Similar flavor profile, but not quite as strong.
    • I can never really pick out the hardwood smell in the finished food. Whether it's hickory, oak, apple, etc. - it all smells mostly the same - like campfire.
    • Not all cooks are at 225. I did a tri tip closer to 275, with similar results.

    I'm pretty stumped - would love some advice!

     

    Place the wood far enough from the starter so that the coals around the starter have reached full burn before the wood starts to burn.

    The higher the heat the cleaner the smoke will be.

     


  4. On 5/8/2020 at 10:09 AM, Chasdev said:

    Well, lets see..lots of stick burners are insulated, most of the high dollar versions it seems, so that's not much of a stumbling block it would seem.

    As to how long it would take to heat to 275, probably not that long.

    As to temp run-away, well just start small and don't go crazy with the amount of fuel added, you know JUST like a stick burner.

    I'm not trying to heat soak the ceramic, rather the air in the kamado.

    As the ceramic heats up, the amount of fuel added goes down, just enough to make that sweet sweet smoke.

    I used to burn mini-splits in my offset once the coal base was built up, that way the slowly burning 8 inch x 2 inch splits placed away from the coals, added crucial smoke without adding much to the coal base.

    I've got a very nice pellet cooker and the meat from it lacks smoke flavor even with a smoke adder device.

    My kamado also fails to produce smoke flavored meat.

    Good news is that this thread SO OLD that I already bought a Masterbuilt gravity smoker and IT can induce smoke flavor just fine thanks.

    So, the kamado is safe for now, at least from me.

     

    Tom, please read the last two sentences from my last post..


  5. 5 hours ago, KamadoKarl said:

     

    First time I hear this. And I've read that tip of wrapping smoke chips in aluminium foil often in different places. Even in books by a (former?) bbq world champion.

     

    Do you have a reliable source?

     

    I do. It's called Google, do a quick search, Aluminum begins to give off Aluminum hydrate and related compounds at 293 degrees or hotter. On the stove top or in the oven these temps are easily reached. Take a look at your old aluminum utensils and notice the pitting that occurs. That is caused by the molecular degradation of aluminum during the heating process when it exceeds 290 degrees. It takes a long time to result in the pitting, but it does not take that much in your body to create damage. Remember, Aluminum content in the brain was the first reliable test to predict Alzheimer's.


  6. TipTopTemp for me, cheap and easy to use, easy to mount.

    Drawback is that when it gets clogged up with grease, vinegar used to remove grease damages the ink making it harder to read the numbers.

    After three or four soakings in vinegar they were gone.

    Still worth the money though and very functional.


  7. I also hated the first few cooks I did with lump coal, having switched from a stickburner.

    That scrap wood fire smell stunk up my porch and ruined the meat IMHO, the cure was ditching cowboy and royal oak and switching to Fogo and KJ lump.

    Night and day difference with almost no flavor added from the lump, all smoke flavor from the wood I chose.


  8. Well, lets see..lots of stick burners are insulated, most of the high dollar versions it seems, so that's not much of a stumbling block it would seem.

    As to how long it would take to heat to 275, probably not that long.

    As to temp run-away, well just start small and don't go crazy with the amount of fuel added, you know JUST like a stick burner.

    I'm not trying to heat soak the ceramic, rather the air in the kamado.

    As the ceramic heats up, the amount of fuel added goes down, just enough to make that sweet sweet smoke.

    I used to burn mini-splits in my offset once the coal base was built up, that way the slowly burning 8 inch x 2 inch splits placed away from the coals, added crucial smoke without adding much to the coal base.

    I've got a very nice pellet cooker and the meat from it lacks smoke flavor even with a smoke adder device.

    My kamado also fails to produce smoke flavored meat.

    Good news is that this thread SO OLD that I already bought a Masterbuilt gravity smoker and IT can induce smoke flavor just fine thanks.

    So, the kamado is safe for now, at least from me.


  9. The idea mate would be, once having created an opening in the ceramic,  to add an offset stick burner type fire box therefore creating the best of both worlds, stick burner hard wood flavored meat AND heat retention in the cook chamber via the Kamado's nature.

     

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