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gotzero

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  1. Haha
    gotzero got a reaction from daninpd in First in person look-C8 Z51 Stingray   
    Awesome! My neighbor recently finished a second building for his Corvette collection. He is refusing to say which C8 is on order, but I cannot wait to see the monster that arrives. My oldest asked me once why we did not have cool cars like that and I was tempted to reply, "you!".
     
    It will be a long while, but I imagine I will own a C8 at some point. It checks too many boxes for the long dormant gearhead in me. In the meantime, our supercar remains our minivan.  
     
     
  2. Like
    gotzero reacted to dylanm in Another Joetisserie cook   
    My love for the joetisserie continues.  This was an 8lb bird which sat in fridge uncovered for about 3 hours before cook.  Just a simple coating of Seasonest Lemon Fire and then on the pole she goes!  Roasted straight over the coals, no drip pan, at about 365F for about an hour then bumped to 400F for the last 20-30.  We got pet chickens a few months ago and now my 11 year old daughter is going through the "horrible to eat a chicken" phase, however, she still enjoys chicken nuggets and chicken fries....wife was working late so just me eating which meant that it was plated with no veggies or potatoes, just meat with a side of beer!




  3. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from SmoovD in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  4. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from philpom in First in person look-C8 Z51 Stingray   
    Awesome! My neighbor recently finished a second building for his Corvette collection. He is refusing to say which C8 is on order, but I cannot wait to see the monster that arrives. My oldest asked me once why we did not have cool cars like that and I was tempted to reply, "you!".
     
    It will be a long while, but I imagine I will own a C8 at some point. It checks too many boxes for the long dormant gearhead in me. In the meantime, our supercar remains our minivan.  
     
     
  5. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from ckreef in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  6. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from Rob_grill_apprentice in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  7. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from Golf Griller in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  8. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from In2Fish in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  9. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from daninpd in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  10. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from KismetKamado in Scratch Tofu   
    Originally for the challenge I wanted to make my favorite salad with all of the ingredients from my garden, and make tofu as a part of that. When I realized the garden was a no no, I thought I would stick with tofu. 

    I found an "easy" recipe, got some dried beans and coagulant, and then put it out of my mind because there was so much time left. Yesterday, I realized the month was ending and I got started. Thankfully I did not wait until today...

    Step one is to take dried soybeans and soak them in water overnight. "Wait overnight" seemed like the fastest and most exciting step of making tofu.
     


    Next is draining the beans and then blending with more water to make the precursor of soy milk. 
     

     

     
    Then you strain the milk, heat it up, and then let it cool again. 
     

     

     
    Then you heat it. Again. And cool it. Again. "Make Tofu" could be the next "Wax On/Wax Off" if there is another Karate Kid remake. At this point you add the coagulant and wait "a couple minutes", but guess what, we are MAKING TOFU, and that means it is "a couple hours". 
     

     


    After you take a look at how many more hours you would get if you decided to use "Hawaiian Time", the curds form, and you put the "solids" inside of cheesecloth and press it, again, "for a few minutes". By this time, it is dark, everyone else has gone to bed, and you are left to wonder about your choices. If you decide to do this, I hope you have a nice long book. If not, write a book. You will have the time, and in the COVID era, as Ina Garten says, "nobody is dropping by". My pressing certainly resulted in a 3x reduction, and most certainly did not result in "extra firm tofu".
     

     

     
    I got it out of the cheesecloth, "cut" it, and then got it in a nonstick pan (no chance I was gambling with carbon steel with this gluelike stuff). Thankfully, this is where things started to go right, and I have a lot of experience making the tofu that professionals make delicious. Fried with olive oil and Cabela's Tequila Lime Seasoning.
    Finally, things are turning a corner. Tofu is fried, looks good, smells good, holds form.
     

     


    After a 15 minute dry-out at ~350F in the kamado with hickory for smokewood I am left with enough tofu for an appetizer for one.
     

     
    Ta da! Taste is excellent, rub is perfect, smoke is perfect, crunch is perfect. 
     

     
    While I cannot imagine making my own tofu again for normal reasons, I suppose I might do it with the kids sometime, or if the apocalypse really comes and there is a period with no power and I am out of everything else but the dried beans, and I decide to cook it up for one last meal (and NOT cleaning any pots) before hitting Fury Road. Tofu made this way is delicious, we will continue to make it, but definitely not from scratch. I could see, "make your own tofu!" in a pamphlet from the power and water company. The fact I can buy enough to feed the whole family for $2.49 seals the deal. No time or money savings here, from now on I trust the pros. Glad I did it, do not want to do it again (but just in case the feeling hits me, I have a 500 year supply of Nigari Flakes).
  11. Like
    gotzero reacted to ckreef in Crab Stuffed Scallops - Nothing Fresh, Nothing Frozen   
    Crab stuffed scallops served with cream corn and Ciabatta crustini's. 
     
    My COVID-19 Challenge 
     

     
     
    Started by making a rustic ciabatta biga. 
     

     
     
    After a 24 hour biga counter rise I mixed up the main ingredients then did a 4 part stretch and fold. Into the refrigerator for a couple of days. 
     

     
     
    The ciabatta in my new Emile Henry pan. 
     

     
     
    Making crustini's
     

     
     
    Cream corn from a recipe by @philpom. I guess he never envisioned it made with powdered milk - Anything for a challenge cook
     

     
     
    Stuffed scallops. The large ones stuffed with crab the small ones with salmon. 
     

     

     
     
    The crab version turned out good. The salmon ones tasted like tuna and were sort of yucky. 
     

     
     
     
     
  12. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from KJTerp in 2020 Mid Atlantic Gardening   
    A combination of the weather and being home every day is really something. My lawn looks like a golf course just from being able to fertilize with the precision of a farmer and mowing every couple of days. We added 2,500sqft to the fenced in back yard and reclaimed an additional 2,000sqft of wooded ground with 30 cuyds of mulch. 
     
    That does not even get to the garden. Being able to be out there at the right time, even ten minutes a day, is a game changer. Broccoli? From home. Kale? From home. Basil? Sweet, Purple, or Thai? Strawberries? My kids pick and eat. Mint? I wish I knew I BBQ recipe that needed Lbs of mint. Additionally, I ordered and planted Honeycrisp and Pixie Crunch Apple trees now in a triangle with my producing Granny Smith. We are making the most of this here.
     
    All of that said, my real love is growing peppers. Bells are coming in, Jalapenos are huge, Habaneros are doing well. All of those pale to shi####os this year, which are coming in at both a quantity and size I can hardly believe. In an era when we cannot entertain, I am about to start having to leave them at the curb. Pan is a 12" Carbon Steel Lodge. Unreal. 
     

  13. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from TKOBBQ in Chicken and Veggies   
    Keeping things simple around here with both ingredients and cooks, but I at least did this and took pictures of it in May! It is still easy to get whole chickens so we are having whole chickens quite a bit. Using the rotisserie much more than usual. 
     
    One nice thing about working from home is it is easy to do early afternoon preheats.
     

     
    Whole chicken goes on and back to work:
     

     
    Then green beans covered in honey, soy, and chili pepper:
     

     
    Everything ready for dinner:
     

     
    And then the rest of the chicken went into quesadillas for dinner the next night:
     

     
     
  14. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from lnarngr in Chicken and Veggies   
    Keeping things simple around here with both ingredients and cooks, but I at least did this and took pictures of it in May! It is still easy to get whole chickens so we are having whole chickens quite a bit. Using the rotisserie much more than usual. 
     
    One nice thing about working from home is it is easy to do early afternoon preheats.
     

     
    Whole chicken goes on and back to work:
     

     
    Then green beans covered in honey, soy, and chili pepper:
     

     
    Everything ready for dinner:
     

     
    And then the rest of the chicken went into quesadillas for dinner the next night:
     

     
     
  15. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from skreef in Chicken and Veggies   
    Keeping things simple around here with both ingredients and cooks, but I at least did this and took pictures of it in May! It is still easy to get whole chickens so we are having whole chickens quite a bit. Using the rotisserie much more than usual. 
     
    One nice thing about working from home is it is easy to do early afternoon preheats.
     

     
    Whole chicken goes on and back to work:
     

     
    Then green beans covered in honey, soy, and chili pepper:
     

     
    Everything ready for dinner:
     

     
    And then the rest of the chicken went into quesadillas for dinner the next night:
     

     
     
  16. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from ckreef in Chicken and Veggies   
    Keeping things simple around here with both ingredients and cooks, but I at least did this and took pictures of it in May! It is still easy to get whole chickens so we are having whole chickens quite a bit. Using the rotisserie much more than usual. 
     
    One nice thing about working from home is it is easy to do early afternoon preheats.
     

     
    Whole chicken goes on and back to work:
     

     
    Then green beans covered in honey, soy, and chili pepper:
     

     
    Everything ready for dinner:
     

     
    And then the rest of the chicken went into quesadillas for dinner the next night:
     

     
     
  17. Like
    gotzero reacted to keeperovdeflame in Last cook before Stage 2 Fire Restrictions   
    Paid 19 bucks for the chicken,  more than I have ever paid for one  in the past, however, what a great result. Flavor was delicate but distinctive, flesh was consistently moist, firm and white meat was alabaster white while the dark meat was a rose color. When I broke down the chicken after dinner the meat was firm but just felt like silk, never had one like this before. The clerk at the meat co told me French Red Farm Chicken is a specific breed, the ones they sell are bred and raised in the US. Place called Joyce farms. Cage free, veggie diet only, no growth hormones. Gotta say best chicken I have ever had. Dinner was delicious. The addition of smoked paprika to my Simon and Garfunkel, really produced a nice pleasing color. 
     
    On the fire restrictions: I know they sound harsh, but I live in the heart of wild fire country, and it has been really hot and dry following a exceptionally wet winter. That means lots of grass, tree, and plant growth that was green this Winter but dry and highly flammable now.  We are the town that lost 19 hot shots; all killed in one terrible moment during the Yarnell fire. So we, unfortunately know how severe the consequences of a wildfire can be. Nobody really likes fire restrictions, but absolutely nobody who lives here complains. Just part of living in the Rural Urban Interface. 
     
    On the grill

    veggie pan

    Plated

  18. Like
    gotzero reacted to JohnnyAppetizer in Inihaw Na Manok   
    Inihaw Na Manok, AKA Filipino Chicken, AKA Lemon-Lime Lacquered Grilled Chicken
     





     
     
  19. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from Golf Griller in Chicken and Veggies   
    Keeping things simple around here with both ingredients and cooks, but I at least did this and took pictures of it in May! It is still easy to get whole chickens so we are having whole chickens quite a bit. Using the rotisserie much more than usual. 
     
    One nice thing about working from home is it is easy to do early afternoon preheats.
     

     
    Whole chicken goes on and back to work:
     

     
    Then green beans covered in honey, soy, and chili pepper:
     

     
    Everything ready for dinner:
     

     
    And then the rest of the chicken went into quesadillas for dinner the next night:
     

     
     
  20. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from KismetKamado in Chicken and Veggies   
    Keeping things simple around here with both ingredients and cooks, but I at least did this and took pictures of it in May! It is still easy to get whole chickens so we are having whole chickens quite a bit. Using the rotisserie much more than usual. 
     
    One nice thing about working from home is it is easy to do early afternoon preheats.
     

     
    Whole chicken goes on and back to work:
     

     
    Then green beans covered in honey, soy, and chili pepper:
     

     
    Everything ready for dinner:
     

     
    And then the rest of the chicken went into quesadillas for dinner the next night:
     

     
     
  21. Like
    gotzero reacted to ckreef in Reef's Camp Cooking - Deep Bend Landing   
    It's a winding road into the campground but Wow! Check out this huge river front site I got!
     

     

     
     
    Now onto some cooks I did over Memorial weekend. All these were either cooked on my CampChef setup or in the Travel Trailer oven. 
     
    Cheesecake stuffed peaches for desert. 
     

     
    For a snack I made some fried provolone with Italian herbs and a pinch of garlic. 
     

     
     
    A few breakfast cooks. When you don't have a toaster, no worries. Griddle toast with eggs and home fries. 
     

     
    Pancakes with peach chunks and a homemade peach mapple syrup I canned last year. 
     

     
     
    The star of the breakfast cooks was thick cut French toast stuffed with sweet cheese and lingonberries with a blueberry syrup. 
     

     
     
    Onto a few dinners. We assembled this pulled pork mac and cheese a few weeks ago and froze it in the ceramic dish. Just needed to defrost it and put it in the oven. I also made an impromptu Orange Habanero BBQ sauce to go with it. 
     

     
     
    Pork chops on the CampChef grill box. 
     

     
    And lastly Bronx Bombers. I've made and posted these in the past but knew they would work good in the extra small travel trailer oven. 
     

     

     
     
    Awesome Memorial weekend trip in a great campground. See you next month. 
     
     
     
     
     
  22. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from Graham in Big Joe 3 vs UK Standard Door Width & COVID   
    That might be the happiest adult face I have seen throughout COVID-19. This thread made my evening. You are going to love your purchase. I still sometimes pinch myself when I realize I often get quiet time on the deck while everyone else in the house is happy with me because I am cooking the stuff they love on an incredibly versatile analog charcoal oven. 
     
    Do yourself a favor and start lobbying for the DoJoe and Joetisserie (while you learn on the basics). Also, since you are in the UK, look out for the Lidl/Aldi mini kamados this summer to add as a sear station, you won't even have to remove your doors!
     
     
  23. Like
    gotzero reacted to Beermachine in Chicken Tikka Masala   
    This was so good a couple of weeks ago I had to do it again tonight.




  24. Like
    gotzero reacted to skreef in Dreamsicle Cake Roll   
    This is my Challenge cook
     
    Dreamsicle Cake Roll
     
    I always wanted to make one. Just never got the chance. It is a very easy cake to make. Glad I finally got the chance to make it.
     
    Ingredients

     
    First made the cake with 5 eggs into merangue. Folded the egg yolks, flour with merangue. Pour into a jelly roll pan.

    Baked it at *375 for about 35 minutes. I used coco char. As most of you know, this is my go to lump for bake goods. No smoke profile.

     
    While it cooled, I got the filling ready. Cream cheese,Marshmallow cream and Power Suger, Orange Flavoring and a bit of water to get the right consistent.

     
    The cake is ready and cooled. Now cover it with the Cream cheese filling.

     
    Rolled Cake and put in fridge to firm. 

     
    Finally a Slice to see how well I did.

     
    My rolling technique could be better, but the flavor of this cake was delicious. The texture is a sponge cake. I Love this Cake. Def make this again. Maybe a Chocolate next time.
     
    Thanks for looking
    Skreef
  25. Like
    gotzero got a reaction from Beermachine in Marinated Chicken Breasts on the Rotisserie!   
    That is awesome!
     
    We started smoking chicken breasts recently, I cannot believe how good they taste! Doing a lot of big cooks on the weekends for weekday lunches, at least pre-bizarro-world.
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