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moloch16

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  1. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from WI/TN in Stuff Pork Loin   
    This would have been MUCH better on my Kamado but the weather turned bad and I needed to cook the loin so did it in the oven.  Inspired by recipes that use a lot of fennel which I didn't have, I just went my own way.  Butterflied the loin and then stuffed with sausage, pecans, and a ton of fresh thyme and rosemary (sadly, forgot to add some garlic!).  Also made a nice mustard sauce (not pictured) Twice baked potatoes and green beens rounded it out.



  2. Like
    moloch16 reacted to Tenkiller Lakerat in Thermoworks Billows?   
    The latest Signals has the open lid sensing feature that works rather well. Yesterday while smoking the ribs, I opened the lid twice. the fan came on for just a second or two, then shut off. Apparently it reads the sudden temp drop. Chamber temp dropped to @ 160 while doing my thing and after closing the lid again the fan didn't come back on and climbed past my target of 225 to 232. Signals then took back over and continued the cook at 225.
    The Smoke I have is what convinced me to upgrade to the Signals and Billows combo because of it's quality and ease of use. The Smoke has now been stored away.
    . BTW. I took the whole daisy wheel assembly off and just jam the TTT into the hole. I didn't permanently seal it off so that when the flapper gets gummed up I can remove the dial and soak the rest of it it in carburetor cleaner overnight.
  3. Like
    moloch16 reacted to Tenkiller Lakerat in Thermoworks Billows?   
    I had already modified my lower slider with a flat piece of sheetmetal, just didn't like that curved end for accurate adjustments and for shutting down. I don't see much of a way to mount it with the stock slider, plus the mounting plates I ordered weren't even close to the groove size.
    Got my Signals and Billows last Thursday and did 2 meatless burns to get it dialed in while using my TTT. Figured out to just initially set it where I normally do and the Billows takes good care of the fire. I would guess that if you are still using the daisy wheel, it would be the same.
    Start a small fire in the lump, open the bottom wide open, get the Signals and Billows rigged up with the grate probe, put the deflector on, then the grate and close the lid. Let the temperature come up to @160 and then close the bottom til it's about the size of the Billows opening and mount it. Plug the fan wire in and away it goes. The fan shuts off @20 degrees before the target and cycles in short bursts til it gets there.
    Mine overshoots the set temp by about 8 degrees for about the first hour of cycling and then settles in. Did a chuck roast first and was I ever impressed! As I type this, I have a rack of baby backs on and it's been holding within 2 degrees for about 4 hours.
     
  4. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from pmillen in How do you do your chicken?   
    Yes that's about right for one chicken.  Marinate the chicken for minimum 4 hours but the longer you go the better, I try to do it overnight (24 hours).  Baste it the during the last 15-20 minutes of cooking, I usually baste once wait about 10 minutes and then again.
  5. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from pmillen in How do you do your chicken?   
    Yep, that's what I do too.
  6. Like
    moloch16 reacted to MikeRobinson in Leaky Akorn gasket   
    I find this entire conversation very interesting because with my Akorn "I just let it coast up to 300 degrees."  And it very happily stays there.  In fact, every time I use my Akorn, that's how I use it every time.  (If any guest really wants "sear flavor," I do it with a cast-iron skillet on my kitchen stove.)
     
    Truth be told, I generally think of it as a "charcoal-fired convection oven."  Which gives me very precise, repeatable results that no other "charcoal grill" could ever do.
     
    For "smoke," I put soaked smoking-chips in a wrapper of aluminum foil, poke a few holes in it with a fork, and get a very nice smoke flavor.
  7. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from KismetKamado in Stuff Pork Loin   
    This would have been MUCH better on my Kamado but the weather turned bad and I needed to cook the loin so did it in the oven.  Inspired by recipes that use a lot of fennel which I didn't have, I just went my own way.  Butterflied the loin and then stuffed with sausage, pecans, and a ton of fresh thyme and rosemary (sadly, forgot to add some garlic!).  Also made a nice mustard sauce (not pictured) Twice baked potatoes and green beens rounded it out.



  8. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from adauria in Favorite rub mixes   
    I've used the Weber brand rubs, found them at Walmart, they are really good and not that expensive.  To start with I would just go to Walmart or something and just look and see what catches your eye.  It's fun to experiment with different brands and types, remembering to match the rub with the application:
    Sweet rubs, usually red from paprika: Pork BBQ (ribs, butts, etc) low-and slow Pepper rubs - rubs with lots of pepper:  Beef Savory rubs - rubs with herbs:  Chicken However, it's fun to play with all the types on all the meats.  You can mix and match types on any type of meat.  Have fun and experiment!  Just remember:
    Sweet rubs will burn at high temps, so better for low-and-slow cooks Most commercial rubs have salt - so probably won't need any salt other than the rub itself Also, take a look at making your own rubs.  You can really have fun and come up with your own personal favorites.
     
     
  9. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from lnarngr in Favorite rub mixes   
    I've used the Weber brand rubs, found them at Walmart, they are really good and not that expensive.  To start with I would just go to Walmart or something and just look and see what catches your eye.  It's fun to experiment with different brands and types, remembering to match the rub with the application:
    Sweet rubs, usually red from paprika: Pork BBQ (ribs, butts, etc) low-and slow Pepper rubs - rubs with lots of pepper:  Beef Savory rubs - rubs with herbs:  Chicken However, it's fun to play with all the types on all the meats.  You can mix and match types on any type of meat.  Have fun and experiment!  Just remember:
    Sweet rubs will burn at high temps, so better for low-and-slow cooks Most commercial rubs have salt - so probably won't need any salt other than the rub itself Also, take a look at making your own rubs.  You can really have fun and come up with your own personal favorites.
     
     
  10. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from Mr.Chlorine in How do you do your chicken?   
    Jerk chicken is one of my absolute favorites.  Cook it how you like, can't really go wrong.  Here's the recipe I follow, it's amazing.
     
    Jerk Chicken
    4 scallions
    1/4 cup vegetable oil
    1/4 cup soy sauce
    2 tablespoons cider vinegar
    2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
    2 habanero chiles, stemmed (three if you like it HOT)
    10 sprigs fresh thyme (this is the key ingredient, don't skimp)
    5 garlic cloves, peeled
    2 1/2 teaspoons ground allspice
    1/2 teaspoons table salt
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
    Lime Wedges

    Process scallions, oil, soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, peppers, thyme sprigs, garlic, allspice, salt, cinnamon and ginger in blender until smooth.

    Save some marinade for basting, marinade chicken with the rest.

    Serve with lime wedges.
  11. Like
    moloch16 reacted to Beermachine in Thai Red Chicken Curry   
    Yes, Lodge 14' inch cast iron wok. Love it.
     
  12. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from Beermachine in Thai Red Chicken Curry   
    Looks great!  Is that a cat iron wok?
  13. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from Golf Griller in Stuff Pork Loin   
    This would have been MUCH better on my Kamado but the weather turned bad and I needed to cook the loin so did it in the oven.  Inspired by recipes that use a lot of fennel which I didn't have, I just went my own way.  Butterflied the loin and then stuffed with sausage, pecans, and a ton of fresh thyme and rosemary (sadly, forgot to add some garlic!).  Also made a nice mustard sauce (not pictured) Twice baked potatoes and green beens rounded it out.



  14. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from mike echo in Help w/Bland Pork Butt   
    After pulling you really do need to season the pulled meat or it will be pretty bland.  The rubbed portion that forms the bark is tasty but is a small percentage of final product.  The most important addition when pulling will be salt, that really brings out the flavor of the pork.  Then you can add some rub, some vinegary BBQ sauce, brown sugar, etc to taste.  Note that some prepared rubs can be pretty salty, so don't salt the meat and THEN add rub, it might make it too salty.
     
    The important ingredients for making the pulled pork pop is Salt, Vinegar, Sugar.
     
    The proportion you use and how you get those into the meat will be a personal preference.  For example, a lot of people don't want to taste the vinegar but just a little will go unnoticed and really bring out the other flavors.
  15. Like
    moloch16 reacted to 97redz3 in Help w/Bland Pork Butt   
    Thanks ... very helpful. Sounds like I've been missing a critical step. I plan on doing a lot of grilling over the next 30 days giving our COVID-19 "stay-at-home" order here in St. Louis. Now I just have to find a way to get some more charcoal.
  16. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from CentralTexBBQ in Help w/Bland Pork Butt   
    After pulling you really do need to season the pulled meat or it will be pretty bland.  The rubbed portion that forms the bark is tasty but is a small percentage of final product.  The most important addition when pulling will be salt, that really brings out the flavor of the pork.  Then you can add some rub, some vinegary BBQ sauce, brown sugar, etc to taste.  Note that some prepared rubs can be pretty salty, so don't salt the meat and THEN add rub, it might make it too salty.
     
    The important ingredients for making the pulled pork pop is Salt, Vinegar, Sugar.
     
    The proportion you use and how you get those into the meat will be a personal preference.  For example, a lot of people don't want to taste the vinegar but just a little will go unnoticed and really bring out the other flavors.
  17. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from lnarngr in Best Practice for Akorn with temp controler   
    I've never used a controller but startup is one of the questions I've had concerning those.  I wonder if you brought it up to temp manually and then put the fan on to keep it there?  Perhaps the controller isn't smart enough to bring it up to temp but will do a good job holding it there.
  18. Thanks
    moloch16 got a reaction from SeaBrisket in What's your side grill?   
    We have the Weber Spirit E-210 purchased because the wife "doesn't want to deal with charcoal".  This is their two burner model and I must admit it's very convenient and we use it alot.  I'm happiest when I have both my Kamado and Weber fired at the same time cooking for a crowd of people
  19. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from Ogopogo in Tip Top Temp on Akorn   
    Welcome to the forums and love your product, use it all the time!
  20. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from Ogopogo in Tip Top Temp on Akorn   
    How are you measuring the chamber temp?  When you chuck 16 pounds of cold meat in the cooker the chamber temp will certainly be affected for quite a while but the exhaust temperature may not have changed.  So your fire is still cooking at the same temp but the internal temperature dropped.  Trying sticking an instant read thermometer at the exhaust before and after putting the meat on to see if it changes.
     
    The TTT is nice but not perfect and not as accurate as a fan.  A swing plus or minus 15-25 degrees is not unusual nor is it a bad thing necessarily.  As the fire moves around and finds fuel or doesn't, the temp will go up or down even with the TTT in place.  Really the TTT keeps you from having insanely big swings but isn't accurate enough to compare with say a computer controlled fan.
     
    Couple of things I've noticed when cooking on the Akorn with TTT.
    Cooking lower than 250 isn't a good idea.  You won't get enough combustion to produce smoke, and may snuff your fire.  I suggest 275 on the Akorn.  I usually settle in at 250 and them make very small adjustments up to 265-275. Anytime you open the lid expect a temperature spike, so don't open unless you have to. Towards the end of the cook when the meat is getting up to temp, the chamber temperature climbs.  I just expected it and let it ride.
  21. Like
    moloch16 reacted to O C in Pork Butt with TempMaster Portable   
    I don't do low and slow very often, but that may change with my new TempMaster Portable. Excellent results for this pork butt (read through all pages of the How To Cook a Boston Butt to brush up on things). 7.25 lbs rubbed with mustard and Dizzy Pig Dizzy Dust, started the Akorn at 5:15 am, put the butt on at 6:05. Used KJ BB and an apple and pecan chunk. Ran the grill at 250 most of the cook. It ran a little hot the first hour but that was most likely due to me getting too many coals lit to start. After about an hour or so it settled in steady at 250 all day. Didn't peek until 2pm. At 4:00 I foiled it (IT 178) and bumped the temp to 275. Put on 4 chicken thighs for my daughter who doesn't eat pork. Butt off at 5:30 IT 195, wrapped in a cooler, thighs off shortly after.
    No plate shot but all of it was so good and tender. Family loved it.
    The TempMaster Portable worked flawlessly, as did the Akorn.

  22. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from lnarngr in Leaky Akorn gasket   
    You could create your own custom seal by applying hi-temp RTV silicone to the base, covering loosely with foil, and closing the lid.  The silicone will conform to the gaps in the lid gasket and create a better seal.  After it dries, remove the foil (or just leave it).  Note I haven't done this with the Akorn but have applied this technique with other smokers.
     
    Low temps like 225 are problematic for the Akorn due to the insulation, fixing the gasket will probably not solve that issue.  I cook at 275 with great results.
  23. Thanks
    moloch16 got a reaction from lnarngr in Trouble Keeping Low Temps   
    I would recommend cooking at 275 on the Akorn in order to get a good smokey flavor and smoke ring.  Technically you don't need a smoke ring for good food but it is an indicator of how your food cooked.  Reason for 275 is that the Akorn is so well insulated if you cook at 225-250 you aren't getting much airflow, therefore not much combustion, and that impacts the flavor of the food.
     
    If you watch your smoke output at 225 and then compare it to 275, you'll see what I'm talking about.  You get a nice steady flow of blue smoke at 275, and barely a trickle, if any at 225.
     
    I usually aim for a "high" 250 meaning if I overshoot to 275, awesome, but if not I can slowly raise the temps.  Additionally, I start with a dry drip pan and if things get a little crazy and I need to bring the temp down, I add an inch or so of water to the drip pan.  This will reduce the temperatures back to where I want them.
  24. Like
    moloch16 got a reaction from lnarngr in Ageing vs vacuum-packed pork butt   
    Never heard of dry aging pork.  Also, I'm not sure it sits long enough to "dry age" like is done with beef.  Anyhow,  I recommend buying one of each, cook them both at the same time, and then let us know the results
  25. Thanks
    moloch16 got a reaction from Smoke Eater in Ageing vs vacuum-packed pork butt   
    Never heard of dry aging pork.  Also, I'm not sure it sits long enough to "dry age" like is done with beef.  Anyhow,  I recommend buying one of each, cook them both at the same time, and then let us know the results
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