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pmillen

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Everything posted by pmillen

  1. I’m a bit annoyed by vague recipes. Instructions like “Add some oregano” or “Add your preferred amount of garlic” are meaningless the first time I follow a given recipe. Moreover, charcoal cooking temperatures, like medium-high, are especially worthless to me. I know, I know, some of you will say, “Just cook it to the proper internal temperature irrespective of the heat.” I do, but grill heat plays an important role in meat texture and Maillard reaction production. So, since a medium temperature on my Kamado Joe is significantly different from the medium temperature attainable on my two-burner hibachi, I set about trying to determine if there’s an actual temperature consensus among professional cooks. The first (and only) cookbook I reviewed is a collection of other authors’ recipes, Weber’s Greatest Hits, by Jamie Purviance. He doesn’t differentiate between grate temperature and dome temperature, but his definitions appear to be– High............ 450° to 550° Med-High.... 400° to 500° Med............. 350° to 450° Low............. 250° to 350° So, what temperature do you use when you read Low, Medium or High? And do you measure at the grate or dome? BTW, I prefer grate temperature since I consider dome thermometers to be unreliable, and even if accurate, don’t tell me much about the heat surrounding the meat.
  2. Well I'lllll be! (Gomer Pyle) I quickly scrolled past that photograph to get to the text. Dumb me!
  3. Are you referring to the cast iron grate? If so, many grills are equipped with only CI grates and everything cooked on that grill is cooked on the CI. But—CI is famous for its ability to hold heat and make excellent grill marks so most of us think of steak cooking.
  4. I have an old ThermoWorks. It's accurate and easy to use, even when adjusting emissivity. If you're wanting to measure the temperature of a surface, use a Surface Thermapen. It works better than IR.
  5. I have the Rock's Stoker. I love it, but it can be kind of a pain to set up. It sends real time temperature graphs to my computer. I save them with annotated notes in my cooking diary.
  6. I often grill chicken-only shish kebabs next to vegetable-only ones. They are seasoned differently but cook at the same temperature. Is there a way to put a partition inside the drum so that the chicken and vegetables don't mix seasonings and can be added or removed separately?
  7. I often grill chicken-only shish kebabs next to vegetable-only ones. They are seasoned differently but cook at the same temperature. Is there a way to put a partition inside so that the chicken and vegetables don't mix seasonings?
  8. I suspect that what we call seasoning is oil coke. It burns. I've had seasoning burn off of cast iron grates heated really hot over charcoal so I'm in agreement with the OP. It's no longer an issue with me because I quit getting the grates and griddle screaming hot, since I much prefer a Maillard reaction browning to a black searing. Black searing is just burning the meat. From Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking by Nathan Myhrvold, Chris Young and Maxime Bilet. "You might think that raising the temperature even higher [above 300°F] would enhance the Maillard reaction. It does up to a point, but above 180 °C / 355 °F a different set of reactions occur: pyrolysis, also known as burning. People typically like foods a little charred, but with too much pyrolysis comes bitterness. The black compounds that pyrolysis creates also may be carcinogenic, so go easy on charring your foods for visual appeal."
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