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KJTerp

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    MD
  • Interests
    FIshing, Hunting, Grilling
  • Grill
    Kamado Joe

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  1. Hey ya'll. So I got ambitious about the garden this year, so I'm hopefully going to be drowning in tomatoes and peppers. Coincedentally, this is also the first summer that i'll have both the smoker and the garden humming along at capacity (if the damned rabbits and grounhogs allow) I have two main questions. 1)Smoked/Roasted Salsa recipes, what are your go-to's and bests? Any tips? 2)Canning. Does anyone have a good reliable smoked/roasted salsa that they put up? Thank's all!
  2. John, Do you have issues with your seasoning when you make something like this in CI? I did this in my lodge last summer, and the seasoning was thick and as slick as wet seal, but after it came out of the oven...it was gone.
  3. The philly pork sandwich is the best sandwich on the planet, and makes cheesesteaks seem useless in comparison. Your collards idea sounds like a great one, and I may try this, b/c collards are cheaper than broccoli rabe.
  4. Sometime in the late 70's, strains of salmonella that made chickens sick, were eradicated in chickens, like say, how smallpox was in humans. By doing so, the theory is that it actually allowed for other strains of salmonella that don't make chickens sick to thrive within their digestive tract, basically the salmonella that was bad for chickens took out the salmonella that didnt bother them, but, SPOILER ALERT, that salmonella really ruins us humans. So essentially, an increase in chicken health led to a decrease in food safety. Chickens that carry salmonella aren't sick, just like how you aren't sick even though you have E. Coli in your intestines right this moment. As as to why USDA inspectors can't "Stop it in the processing plant", I don't want to sound snarky, but you can't see bacteria, and you certainly can't swab every single piece of chicken, and then incubate the dish for a couple of days, then run the analysis to see what bacteria is on it.
  5. This, the chicken comes out of the fridge, gets placed on the cutting board, the bag the chicken is in comes off, the chicken is opened, patted down with paper towels, which then go in the bag, the chicken comes out of the package and it patted down again, towels in bag, container in bag, chicken is trimmed, trimmings in bag (or stockpot), chicken is appropriately cut, placed in a bowl, board is wiped, towel in bag, bag is thrown away, board and knife AND HANDS are washed in the sink.
  6. Second the overnight (AT LEAST)fridge air dry. if you salt the bird right before you put it in, even better. just be forewarned, its gonna look WEIRD when it comes out, thats ok. i dont put my other spices on til after this process
  7. Here is my longform Turkey procedure, which I follow pretty closely for Chicken. And the gravy process:
  8. I don't have the deep fryer they flash them with afterwards. I know what the spices are, it's actually pretty simple. They're served sauce-less, and they have that just out of the fryer crispiness that I know i'm not going to be able to duplicate. Even when I get them for take out, unless im eating them in the parking lot, they aren't the same after they sit for a bit. I've made analogues, and flavorwise theyre on point, but it's not quite the same, and my doctor would kill me if I bought a deep fryer
  9. Amen to that. I get legitimately upset with my wife if she wastes money on tomatoes from the grocery store, except cherry tomatoes, theyre ok. I haven't willingly gone to a steakhouse in 10 years, and havent paid for a meal in one ever.
  10. Quantity definitely impacts overall quality. Any sort of chain establishment is going to suffer that. I find that the best "going out" BBQ around here is from smaller establishments. One place near here has pecan smoked wings that I know I will never be able to replicate, and that's ok, because their hushpuppies, fries, brisket reuben, etc are all 8/10, and its not super expensive either. There is a small local chain here that people absolutely fawn over, and i'm disappointed every time. I cannot recommend places like Serious Eats enough. They do some stellar work over there, Gritzer, Stella, Kenji etc etc make some amazing, detailed and well researched recipes. I never thought I could make a decent plate of Indian food, until: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/05/easy-butter-paneer-spinach-recipe.html If you're into food at all, and want to learn more, buy these: https://www.amazon.com/Food-Lab-Cooking-Through-Science/dp/0393081087/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1Y8ULGQWCWG2P&keywords=the+food+lab+by+j.+kenji+lopez-alt&qid=1554465864&s=gateway&sprefix=the+food+lab%2Caps%2C530&sr=8-1 and for baking (this book is worth it for the brown butter chocolate chip cookie recipe alone) https://www.amazon.com/BraveTart-American-Desserts-Stella-Parks/dp/0393239861/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3P7W44D7XYVAG&keywords=bravetart+cookbook&qid=1554465906&s=gateway&sprefix=braveta%2Caps%2C128&sr=8-1 and from Our Lord and Savior Alton Brown, Praise Be Upon Him: https://www.amazon.com/Alton-Brown-EveryDayCook/dp/1101885718/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1179Y70QW2JEQ&keywords=everyday+cook+alton+brown&qid=1554465945&s=gateway&sprefix=everyday+cook%2Caps%2C140&sr=8-1
  11. I just give those people the parts I don't want.
  12. This is a great thread, and certainly has gotten me thinking. I would not call myself a food snob, but I would say that I can be very judge-y towards people who's definition of a "good home cooked meal" is something out of a box, or baked chicken, rice and frozen vegetables. In 2019, there are TONS of resources out there for people who are let's say...challenged in the kitchen department which can help them turn out good food. I was once one of those people, until I discovered Alton Brown. It helped that I was young and hadn't had time to fall into those bad habits that hard. Like @TexasBlues said, I love entertaining people, I love the scramble right there at the end, or the times the scramble doesnt happen and it all comes together. My wife and I can reliably throw together a pretty solid dinner, which I think is a skill most should have. It's not about just getting nourishment, its about having a good time. I guess it's a lot of showing off, but its still fun for everyone. That feeling when you just knock something out of the park, it's just awesome. I enjoy going out too, I like the change of scenery, spending time with friends and family at a new place, etc. I also try to limit my going out to things that I either A. can't make well (LOOKING AT YOU, MOST ASIAN FOOD), or B. don't have the ability/time/equipment to make well. That said, there is something to be said for going to a place, getting wings and a burger and too many beers and just having a good time and taking a taxi home to a house that wont look and smell like a disaster the next morning. The other thing about restaurants, which I respect, is that they consistently churn out their product. All of us here, no matter how dialed in we are, have off days, but restaurants rarely do (at least a truly good one, which takes time to find), which says a lot to their skill, at least in my opinion.
  13. Hey y’all. So I took my KT off today after I did a cleaning burn the other day. It was fully seized up. It’s never burned clean, it’s always just gotten worse. I soaked it in hot water and dawn, as well as dropping a few denture tabs in too. Most of the heavy gunk (and a good bit of paint) came off with a little elbow grease, a sponge, a nylon brush and a couple areas required some chain mail to knock the goop off. Long story short, after all of that, it still seems filthy as all get out. Should I do something different? I’ve seen some who’ve put them on the grate to do a burn that cooked the paint off, but wouldn’t that just get gunked up too? I’m just wondering if there’s a better way, aside from buying another type of cap. I’m sure I’ll need to do this type of clean again, as annoying as it is. Any ideas? Oh, did some chuckies the other day. So good. I picked some leaner ones this time, so they were a tinnnny bit dry.
  14. I wanna say it was 23 bucks for a 30 pound bag
  15. When I got mine, I lit a fire and played around with vent settings and whatnot first, just to get a feel for how it all worked, so I wouldnt call it a burn in, but i'd call it a "get a general idea of how this goes so i dont have to order pizza like a putz the first time i use my new grill"-in
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