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beerguy911

Members
  • Content Count

    10
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    North Carolina
  • Interests
    Fishing, cooking, videography, sports
  • Grill
    Primo
  1. Thanks for the feedback. I might do the same a Jack did. Keep the replacement in the box for now and keep an eye on the one being used today. If it breaks apart much more than it has then I have one ready to replace.
  2. Wondering if my firebox is breaking down at the two halves meet points. Not sure if this is natural what I am seeing or is there more going on that I should know about. The folks at Primo agree to send me out a new firebox at no charge (except for shipping cost) and this is all good but my greater concern is the fit of the fire box or something else that maybe come a recurring matter. I am attaching a couple pics to better describe what I am seeing. The other half section of the fire box looks straight as one would expect. The Primo XL is less than a year old. Not sure if cooking pizzas around 500 - 550 temp (fire box must be hotter) has something to do with the problem. Thanks Beerguy
  3. Thanks for everyone's input... I have bought a few of the recommended bags of charcoal ranked high in the list nakekwhiz website. Some have a oily smell to it (B&B Charcoal), some do not seem to get hot enough to use for high temp cooks (Cowboy Lump Charcoal), other like Royal Oak (gets hot, no foul smells, lot of dust) but find matter in the bag that is not charcoal, Rockwood Lump (pretty good, good size pieces, no foul smells, gets hot). So from my limited sampling there are differences how the charcoal is processed and the quality of the wood used. For that reason I brought up the suggestion that members get a common area to share their findings. I also think the charcoal producers quality changes overtime and the www.nakedwhiz.com site does not stay up with the changes. Some of their reviews are well over 5 years old. Lastly when new charcoal products hit the market I am not sure the nakedwhiz pics them up today.
  4. I understand that we have nakedwiz.com as a reference source for the different charcoal brands but is appears that listing has become dated and stale as well for different purposes beyond being used in a kamado. Therefore I propose that we start our own topic category that reviews charcoal brands. And if we could also have a rating method similar to nakedwiz.com that would be even better.
  5. One additional note that is key. I now have used the Flame Boss 400. One for boneless pork loin and yesterday I cooked beer can chicken and both times the temperature variance for the meat probe was 11 degrees low for the Flame Boss 400 compared to my Thermapen probe. Now I do not know if the problem is with the controller on the 400 or the probe included with the 400 unit. And I do not know of anyway to calibrate the temp reading of the 400 meat prob. On the positive end the reading of the pit temp probe seemed accurate. If you are now using the Flame Boss 400 you might want to compare the meat temp results that the 400 give off to another meat probe.
  6. Here is a two part review on the newly released Flame Boss 400 I put together. The content included is mine and I tried to stay as objective as I could. Hope this helps those that are seeking a temperature controller for your Kamado cooker. Part two of the Flame Boss 400 Review:
  7. KismetKamado…… your right about historically temp controller were geared for low temp cook management. But more people are looking to expand the usage of their Kamado cooks and the need for high temp cooks are becoming even more important. When we do our pizza bakes in our Primo XL we need to draft more air into the cooker to get over 500 degrees which makes regulating the cooker temps that more difficult. When we open the vents up the Primo XL over shoots to say 550 - 575 in a hurry. Then when we counter this too high a temp by closing the vents it drops temps below 500 degrees. Constant battle. And its not like using gas which you can quickly damp down or ramp up temps, we are talking charcoal which has a burn cycle all its own. Now I did find stainless steel probes that can handle temps up to 700 degrees. My guess they would fit into the control port by just doing a visual review. My problem is the Flame Boss mobile application has a hard upper limit at 450 degrees. I would love nothing more than Flame Boss giving me a work around to extend that limit to say 500 degrees and I will purchase my own probes to handle the higher temps.
  8. Thanks.... T Yelta….. ya the probes they include with the controller are safe to last up to 450 degrees. I will give the folks at Flame Boss anyway on Monday to see what they say.
  9. T Yelta….. its a combined controller and fan unit. So if I did the second of your suggestions I have issues with the fan blowing all the time since the minimum temp for the controller is 225 degrees unless I continually turned the unit on and off at the power plug source. Better to just get close to temp with the controller, pull the fan out and open everything up and finish off the pizza as I do today. I was hoping someone knew how to jail brake the Flame Boss iPhone app and raise the max temp to 500 degrees. Monday I am going to call the vendor and see if they can do anything for me. When more and more folks are making cooks at high temps with their Kamado cookers you think the controllers would stay up with how people use their cookers today. I do many low and slow cooks but I am discovering new ways to use my Primo XL.
  10. Just pit up the Flame Boss 400 and I wanted to set the pit temps to 500 degrees for making pizza. But to Flame Boss application restricts the temp between 225 and 450. Then after looking around at other products they all appear to limit pit temps below 500 degrees. Anyone know of any work arounds to this problem? I did read the vendors limit temps to extend the life span of the probs. Thanks BeerGuy
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