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OpieSF

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  • Location:
    Seattle, WA
  • Grill
    Other Kamado

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  1. Yeah, I realized that after I hit the post button. Same with the plug comment. The square interface is far more versatile once I actually thought through it. Will be interested in reading reviews on this one.
  2. Yeah, same here on all counts. I get that the Smoke is older but yeesh, it must have a much bigger install base. I'm also stumped about why they opted for that aperture/interface. Aren't the plug-style interfaces the defacto standard?
  3. I'm using Kingsford Hardwood briquettes for small, dual zone/indirect cooks and Fogo Super Premium lump for long, low & slow cooks. If I had to choose a fave it would be Fogo, hands down.
  4. Not an expert, but have lived on the fringes of logistics most of my career. For the price, buy two and keep one for parts/backup. The shipping charge probably wouldn't be too divergent if they were crated together. The trick would be finding an LTL carrier that isn't FedEx (or the other, usual suspects) to convey the freight. They're out there, but it'll take some footwork. One other consideration is that when you ship like this you typically take possession of the good once it leaves the FOB point, leaving you on the hook 100% for the transit. If you can, find a freight forwarder that offers insurance.
  5. @ckreef nailed it. I ordered direct from Fogo since Seattle is a charcoal wasteland. It arrived in about 3 business days which is absurdly quick for a parcel to get form Florida to the PNW. Quick/free shipping + quality product = return customer..... ...and the ribs were freaking amazing.
  6. I've had the good fortune to be a new kamado user blessed with @ckreef and his amazing lump comparison thread. I went straight to Fogo Super Premium for my first long-ish (7 hour) short plate cook and honestly, as long as i can continue to get the stuff I'm not going to mess around with anything else. It reacted almost telepathically to the temps I wanted and stayed rock-steady throughout the entire run. Only used 30% of the load as well with the smallest amount of ash you can imagine. The wife loved the aroma it produced before it reached the oak and pecan....and I know where my bread is buttered. I got the SP and Quebracho while they were on sale. The Quebracho is being delivered this week and I'm rubbing my hands together in glee trying to figure out what I'm going to cook with it first.
  7. I made picanaha for the first time this weekend as well using Painted Hills beef. Can confirm everything Cavman said. It is superb in every way. My wife couldn't believe it. @Cavman that sear was superb!
  8. Well done, sir. That looks freaking amazing. I'd also like to know about the flavor change up.
  9. Wow, that looks incredible. Definitely going to try this out...I looove jerk chicken. One thing to try on your next cook is to add a kiss of smoke to the chicken with a mixture of Turkish Bay Leaves and allspice berries. Maybe a handful of leaves and a half cup of berries in a foil pack near the fire so they smolder a bit. Together they allegedly approximate the Pimiento wood (source of allspice berries) they cook the chicken on on the island. Really adds a little somehtin-somethin to the cx even though I cheap out and use bottled jerk marinade from Walkerswood (on Amazon). I also lay down some bay leaves on the grill and place the chicken directly on top of them - everything is better with bay leaves.
  10. This looks like it'll be amazing, but is the tri-tip still wrapped in plastic in that last pic? Honest question: if it's still in plastic what's the advantage over water and a circulator? Poaching in ghee, rosemary, and garlic has to be incredible.
  11. Thanks everyone. @keeperovdeflame You know it's weird, I'm finding some great butchers up here. What shops there were in SF were stupid expensive and I generally just went with Costco. The Seattle Costco seems to be of lower quality from a meat standpoint, even though it's a stone's throw from their HQ. @St1brew Thanks! Never in a million years did I think I would I have a view like this. Makes cooking even better. @BobE Yeah, I went through a LOT of foil. Plumber's torch as well, to get rid of mold.
  12. My driveway is similar and the FedEx guy did exactly that: liftgate off of the truck and pallet jacked the grill down and helped me wedge it into the garage.
  13. You did the recipe proud, DerHusker. Interestingly, cochinita pibil has become something of a 4th of July tradition for my family - I'm going to try some the techniques you've incorporated into my next cook, especially the tight packaging and the scoring. I first had this dish in Playa del Carmen and became obsessed a) finding the best CP in the area and b) recreating it once I returned home. One addition I might offer up as an addition is a bright and spicy salsa we found served at several of the establishments in the Yucatan that served CP. It pairs really well with the richness of the pork: Xnipec Salsa 1 lime, juiced, more if the lime is not juicy, or small half a medium red onion, diced 1 habanero, diced fine, seeds removed it less heat is desired 2 pinches salt, more to taste Combine ingredients in a bowl and let sit for an hour. The lime "ceviches" the onion and hab, making what would be an insanely hot sauce somewhat subdued and 10x tastier. It also serves as a great base for guacamole; just add some garlic salt and you're done.
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