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Beluga

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  • Location:
    San Juan island wa
  • Grill
    Other Kamado

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  1. It was stainless bailing wire. I looked at the big joe firebox. Oh yes, that looks like the one to get. I’m not crazy about spending $120 on it. Then again, It spells the end of the cracked ceramic firebox. Actually it makes me consider trying one more time to repair mine by building some kind of fitted ring around the top rim. I could probably cut one from a piece of sheet metal. But first I’m thinking of finding a more stout stainless wire than what I put on it three years ago. I’ll check out braided stainless wire. Thanks for the tip.
  2. I forgot to mention the chilis. I use whatever I’ve been growing that has a medium heat and is fully red in color in my cold frame. This time I chopped up a large padron pepper and added it, seeds and all, plus one small jalapeño, seeds and all.
  3. Smoke a bunch of tomatillos and tomatoes for an hour or more in cherry smoke. Meanwhile, On the stove mix 8 or more crushed garlic cloves and a couple of finely chopped, strong onions. When they are browned add fresh cilantro, a finally chopped zucchini, thyme, oregano, a few sage leaves and as much fresh basil as you like. I like a lot of basil. Add a cup of good white wine and four tablespoons of raw sugar to the mix. Then take the smoked items off the kamado and into a blender and liquify. Add them to the pot and simmer for three hours. Turn it off and let the pot sit overnight at room temp. simmer it again the next day until it reaches a smooth and dense consistency. By the way, the picture shows just half of the tomatoes and tomatillos smoking on my very old kamado.
  4. Hi Tom, The firebox will be the next thing i replace. It’s a different material than the main ceramic unit, more like cinderblock. It’s pretty much cracked into two pieces which I’ve temporarily repaired last year by binding it with several wraps of wire. While getting the outside of the body ready for painting, I noticed that the wire has corroded to almost nothing. I’m confident the BGE large firebox will serve just fine. Otherwise the inside of the main body looks like it could last another 60 years.
  5. I bought an unknown kamado at a garage sale about five years ago for $75. It had all the ceramic parts plus a very classy hinge mechanism, but nothing else. The paint was peeling off it. Research unearthed all I needed to know about the function of the kamado, although I soon learned it was not a big green egg. I also found the phone number of a guy in Rhode Island who had been importing these Japanese barbecues. He told me mine was probably 50 or 60 years old. He also told me that the parts sold for big green eggs would likely fit it. I bought a stand, a grill, a heat distributor and a very nicely engineered chimney from BGE, and then started learning mostly how to slow cook briskets, ribs and even my own meat chickens. This year I added a brand new stainless air intake and decided to seal the kamado with sky blue wood stove paint before the ceramic itself started to crumble. Here’s a photo of the barbecue as, today I’m cooking baby back ribs.
  6. Thanks for the link, Vanole. I found one crack in the small ceramic lid when I bought it four years ago for $75 at a garage sale. I repaired it with wood stove glue, sanded it, then painted the lid with mahogany wood stove paint. It looks new. I searched eBay yesterday and found one in far worse condition than mine, but with the original metal accessories (all of them rusted) selling for $1300. I had no idea. Made me feel like a winner from antique roadshow. The kamado at that web site looks just like mine. Same elongated shape, that I’ve seen no where else. Mine was once covered with green paint, but I see no evidence of a baked on glaze, unless that loses its shine after 50 years or more. Mine also had slight evidence of a two inch band of orange paint at the seam between top and bottom. Almost all the paint has rubbed off and it would be straightforward to rub off the remainder with steel wool. I'm now thinking of spray painting it with steel blue wood stove paint, and maybe mahogany wood stove paint at the seam. One thing the website tells me is that drilling a few small holes is no big deal. I think I’m going to buy one of those fancy dracarys air intakes. thanks for the help, folks.
  7. Hi jack, I just found a contact email for dracas company. They are in China. I await their response. If engine paint works, I imagine wood stove paint will also work just fine. I guess my question was really seeking info about the longevity of a kamado after the paint has rubbed off. The original light green is almost entirely gone on the upper lid Leaving the buff colored raw ceramic. I have already sprayed wood stove paint on the ceramic cap and the hinge assembly. That worked ok, but doesn’t have the shine or protection of the commercially applied baked glaze.
  8. I own a 70 year old kamado oven made in japan that I found at a garage sale. It had nothing but the ceramic unit. I added new grates, heat disperser, air regulator and even a stand from Big Green Egg. Everything fit perfectly, which makes me realize how much the BGE copies my unit. Now five years have passed, and I notice the original air intake is rusting. I see a really great one made by Dracarys with a punched steel inner piece for sale on Amazon. Before buying i need to know the exact distance between the 4 screw holes on this intake because I don’t want to drill new holes in my ceramic. I noticed two people had already asked amazon the size (not screw hole distance) of this intake but got two different sizes in reply. I'd much appreciate someone here telling me the distance up and down between these screw holes? Also almost all the baked on paint is gone on mine. Can I paint this myself with wood stove paint or is it better to leave it as is?
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