Jump to content

Owly

Members Plus
  • Content Count

    82
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Owly got a reaction from ckreef in Vanishing Napalm Apple Crunch   
    A few years back I perfected the apple pie to the point where people lick their plates, and pies vanish before your astonished eyes..............The trick is extremely simple.   Make the pie normally in every way but one.   Take half a can of frozen concentrate apple juice / cider........ full strength, add a cup of sugar and reduce it in a pan as if you were making candy.......I put a generous shake of cayenne in for a bit of spicy bite... like applesauce with red hots..... I haven't had a candy thermometer for years... since I broke the last one.    It is a very scary process, as you are making napalm.... It is so hot and sticky that it will stick to your skin and take it right off if you get it on yourself.  But candy makers know all about this.   This is cooked down to the point where if it were allowed to cool it would be almost hard.... it would still have give, rather than breaking......... I can't give temps because I've never measured them, but I suspect they are approaching 270F when I take it off the heat.   This is poured over the apples in the pie shell, the upper crust added and the works baked.....The reason it must be cooked down is that the apples yield  their own juice, and it would be runny otherwise......   Believe me the apple flavor is so intense that people cannot leave it alone.
        This evening I did an apple crunch this way, but used a full can of concentrate.... A bit overboard delicious.     This was a generic oatmeal crunch.... C flour C brown sugar C oatmeal, 1/2C melted butter.  I used 7 small  Granny Smith apples in a 10x7 pyrex rectangular pan.   The result is rich, sticky and extremely tangy and flavorful with just a bit of a hot bite.  
     
                                                                                  H.W.
  2. Like
    Owly got a reaction from lnarngr in Chuck roast   
    There is no way to know what the quality is up front........ I generally go at least 24 hrs, but I cook it at 130.... My favorite temp for cooking most meats.... it gives me that intense pink that is one step above rare, and the flavor and moistness that goes with it.  My experience of cooking meat is that it hit's it's peak tenderness at about 130, and beyond that things start going the wrong way, but that's just my opinion. Higher temps result in faster changes, breaking down texture more as it tenderizes.   I seem to be able to turn "base metal" into "gold" at 130........ that is chuck into rib eye or tenderloin...    Your mileage may vary.
         
                                                    H.W.
  3. Like
    Owly got a reaction from Chris Topher in Floating Jars   
    Floating jars in sous vide is a nuisance.   Unlike using vac bags, there is often air space, and with some of the things I do, considerable air space.   Unless you use tall jars, with the product in the bottom, they have a tendency to flip on their sides.   My favorite jars are half pint wide mouth canning jars.   This morning I was experimenting with my power green breakfast  souffle benedict sous vide, and  because it rises quite a bit, I have to limit to just above half full.  These jars are not stable at this fill level, and I cannot reduce the water level in the pot I use enough to make them stable without starving the Annova.    I finally got pissed off enough that I went out and made a rack to set the jars on so I could submerge them to just under the ring.    My pot is a stockpot that I insulated with foam years ago, it also sits on foam, and  has a custom aluminum lid I built with a cutout for the Annova, with a piece of foam and another aluminum disc on top that holds the foam from curling.   It works very well, and I have no evaporation to speak of.
         This rack is simply a piece of aluminum I cut out with my plasma cutter, and perforated with numerous holes using a hole saw so the water can circulate freely.    Beneath it are 3 pieces of 1.5" steel pipe about 3" long, joined by pieces of flat strap welded to them to keep them in an ideal triangle shape to support the rack.... it works perfectly for what I need, providing me with enough additional depth to submerge the Annova sufficiently without floating the jars.
     
        The power greens breakfast souffle was something I wanted to make ahead, as my bag of Costco Power Greens was on the verge of "going off".  I use it in salads and such, and the problem of course is that mixed bagged greens tend to go off faster than I can consume them.  By cooking them like this as they approach end of life, I can save the souffles in the fridge for as much as a week, warm them, and use them later.  The canning jar / sous vide method seems to work very well.... About 45 min at 176, and they are well set, yet tender, and show no desire to fall.   The half pint wide mouth jars taper all the way, so they turn out nicely, and I suspect they could  even be frozen........... warming them without the jar might be an interesting challenge.   These are tender and airy, not tough and chewy like so many egg products, loaded with nutrition unlike the things people buy from what I call the "garbage isle" in the grocery store.  There is no reason  not to include whatever takes your fancy in them.  
     
                                                                                H.W.
  4. Like
    Owly got a reaction from Golf Griller in Power Breakfast   
    I've never been a fan of so called "breakfast foods".    I live a very active life, so breakfast is important to me, but I consider most things people eat for breakfast little better than garbage!
     
    I have several "power breakfasts" I regularly eat, but my current favorite is a sort of green souffle benedict.  Fast and simple.     A hand full  of "power greens", some chopped onion and fresh garlic, some grated cheese, a few cherry tomatoes, one egg and one egg white......... the yoke separated for the sauce, about 2 tsp flour, some salt and about 1/4 t of soda, all go in a single serve blender cup, and are pretty much liqufied.   The works goes into a ramkin that has been greased and floured, and is cooked in the microwave on power3 for about 15 min..... or until firm on top.  While this is going, I have a couple links cooking, and I mix about a T of olive oil or melted butter with with about a t of flour, a pinch of salt and cayenne, and a generous splash of cream or milk, and the egg yoke, which is cooked in a double boiler stirring constantly with a spatula..........  It doesn't take but a couple of minutes if you crank things up.   When It thickens, I throw  in about 1T of lemon juice, and stir until it reaches the consistency I want, then kill the heat and lift the pot out of the boiler.... Once the temp drops, I put it back in to keep it warm.  This is my pseudo hollandaise sauce.    The souffle is removed from the ramkin, and served with the sausages and sauce  for a satisfying and nutritious breakfast.  The result is light and filled with air, not tough and rubbery if done correctly. It rises a bit, but not much, but I've never had one "fall".
          The key  here seems to be the microwave.  I've tried pan fried and baked versions, and the results have not been nearly as satisfying or successful.   I'm tempted to try the sous vide, and probably will, but that will involve at least an hour of cooking, and would have to be done in a pair of those great wide mouth half pint jars greased and floured for release
  5. Like
    Owly got a reaction from John Setzler in Smoke - What You Need to Know   
    I don't see anybody using my favorite source of smoke.    I love the flavor imparted by fresh green creek bottom willow twigs with the bark on.   These are NOT willow trees such as golden or weeping, etc, they are the brush that grows in damp and wet areas, such as #### willows.  I use these for a light smokey flavor when cooking, rather than serious smoking. Most recently I did a rack of prime ribs this way, and a lamb roast.  both were pre-cooked to medium rare, and put on the kamado frozen, and the ribs  were cooked until up to eating temp.    The idea is to create a surface smoke as a seasoning.    The lamb roast was refrozen for later use, so I didn't worry about core temp.   This was done at a low indicated temp.....  around 200.    The lamb was used on New Year's Day dinner, along with the pecan cheesecake pie I described in the dessert section.   We sliced and very briefly steamed the thawed lamb on a wire rack in a skillet to bring it up to temp without cooking it further or drying it out.  It was very delicious, and popular.   Nobody there had ever had lamb smoke cooked.
     
                                                                                      H.W.
  6. Like
    Owly got a reaction from daninpd in Thermal Fuses   
    This is only slightly off topic, as most folks here have kitchen appliances that heat. Coffee makers, hot plates, slow cookers, etc.   Thousands of these appliances end up in the dump each year because they quit working, and nobody fixes them.   My $100 Bunn coffee maker has a 3 year life expectancy plus a little bit.... Just enough to get beyond warranty.   Inevitably a thermal fuse in it fails.  I was fortunate enough once to have still been within warranty, but after buying a replacement once, I simply got mad and cut the thermal fuse out the next time one failed....Had to have that morning coffee!! , and ordered a handful of replacements on  Ebay, installing one later..............
         Today another one failed...... this time on my hotplate during a "process".... it took a little while and a VOM to track down the problem as I was rigged with a PID controller.   I don't like using something like that without a thermal protection system of some sort, so I called the local Radio Shack.   They stock thermal fuses, and one matches except for the current...... too low at 10 amps, but I will parallel 2 of them for current.  These are designed when the ambient temp gets too  high.   In this case 216C.   If you have not dealt with these things before, they look like a small resistor, but have a metal  housing.  The temp rating and current rating are printed on the outside.................
     
    Thermal fuses are normally covered in a heat resistant woven ceramic fabric sleeve.  You may not even notice that it is there.
     
    Don't throw that appliance away........ replace the thermal fuse.   In this throw away society, I try to fix things when I can.
     
                                                                                                                                                                      H.W.
  7. Like
    Owly got a reaction from philpom in Thermal Fuses   
    This is only slightly off topic, as most folks here have kitchen appliances that heat. Coffee makers, hot plates, slow cookers, etc.   Thousands of these appliances end up in the dump each year because they quit working, and nobody fixes them.   My $100 Bunn coffee maker has a 3 year life expectancy plus a little bit.... Just enough to get beyond warranty.   Inevitably a thermal fuse in it fails.  I was fortunate enough once to have still been within warranty, but after buying a replacement once, I simply got mad and cut the thermal fuse out the next time one failed....Had to have that morning coffee!! , and ordered a handful of replacements on  Ebay, installing one later..............
         Today another one failed...... this time on my hotplate during a "process".... it took a little while and a VOM to track down the problem as I was rigged with a PID controller.   I don't like using something like that without a thermal protection system of some sort, so I called the local Radio Shack.   They stock thermal fuses, and one matches except for the current...... too low at 10 amps, but I will parallel 2 of them for current.  These are designed when the ambient temp gets too  high.   In this case 216C.   If you have not dealt with these things before, they look like a small resistor, but have a metal  housing.  The temp rating and current rating are printed on the outside.................
     
    Thermal fuses are normally covered in a heat resistant woven ceramic fabric sleeve.  You may not even notice that it is there.
     
    Don't throw that appliance away........ replace the thermal fuse.   In this throw away society, I try to fix things when I can.
     
                                                                                                                                                                      H.W.
  8. Like
    Owly got a reaction from SmokeyBloke in Proportional Integrative Derivitive Controller   
    Back when I was brewing, and doing some other things related to brewing, which I will not discuss here..... I discovered the PID temp controller.   PIDs are "intelligent", and do not simply turn on and off at a set point, but determine the effect over time of on and off periods, and ultimately anticipate the results of on and off cycles, modulating the on and off times to hold temps very close.  A learning controller you might say..........
         In brewing these are typically used for controlling a heating element, and this is generally done using a solid state relay.   There is no reason this could not be used to control a brushless fan.....     such as a computer fan.   Most computer fans are axial, but they are also available in centrifugal, which means that you could easily direct the flow into your lower air control.  
     
        The best part of this is that a PID with thermocouple and solid state relay can be had on Amazon for a mere $18, and a 12 volt computer fan suitable for the job can be had on Ebay for around $7.00.... all including shipping.  All you need is a "wall wart" to run the fan.......... and some wiring.     If you don't have a 12 volt "wall wart" lying about .... another $8 on AMZN..... or pick one up at the thrift shop for a dollar!!
     
         You can use the system to control your kamado temp............or your mash temp for brewing, or the temp in the top of your reflux column............ or, whatever.   
     
     
                                                                        H.W.
  9. Like
    Owly got a reaction from GLOCKer in Prime Rib Adventure   
    The most flavorful meat is next to the bones.........  While you are eating your prime rib roast tomorrow, I will be doing a light smoke barbecue on the ribs only.  A local chef/caterer finds it more economical to buy bone in, and bone it himself before cooking, and often gives me trimmed off bones with a generous amount of meat in exchange for things I do for him.   I cook them in sous vide to 130, and have begun putting them in the kamado frozen, and smoke cooking them just enough to thaw and bring them up to eating temp.  You don't get a lot of meat per bone, but the meat next to the bone is by far the best!!
     
                                                                   H.W.
  10. Like
    Owly got a reaction from mike echo in Fasting for Survival   
    Avoid setting a pattern is one of my rules.  When you set a pattern, your metabolism adjusts to that pattern.  Keep your body off balance.   I just finished the second fast of this year.   A 5 day following one eating day, after a 3 day.  I'll take a couple of days off, and pick it up again.  I might do my rotating meals fast, which I like...... breakfast today, lunch tomorrow, dinner the next day, nothing the following day, and breakfast the day after that for a week or so..... 30 hour fasts essentially.  I don't count these when I total up fasting days, I only count fasts of at least 48 hours.  The target this year is to 145.  I've let things slip over the period since I stopped last years fast........ because I intended to resume this winter.    If it takes only a brief amount of fasting to hit your goal, you do not stay in autophagy long enough as far as I'm concerned. I'm planning on 40 days total this year over a few months.   I always gain when I visit family, and during the holidays....... and that's OK.   I've changed my regular eating habits, and that's an ongoing process.  I absolutely refuse to "diet" or count calories, or work out in a gym.  I walk 2 miles a day on my own trail through the woods  ..... round trip to the post office.   I'm very fit at 64, and can still hike 20 miles up into the mountains in a day without difficulty.  
     
                                                               H.W.
  11. Like
    Owly got a reaction from DEW in Fasting for Survival   
    Last year in December, I stepped on a scale, and registered 202....... which for my 5'6" (actually I've shrunk to 5'5" (age 64)).......... is far too much.   I've spent most of my life in the range or about 180... which is still to heavy.   I had taken up home brewing........ doing about one brew a week (2 - 3 gallons).   I love to brew, and I've been brewing beer and wine since I was in my early teens.  My brother loves to tell the story about me with my Louisville slugger.... and apples in a burlap sack, at age 12 pulverizing the apples to make apple jack.......... the truth is that I NEVER owned a Louisville  Slugger.... It was a cheap bat, and I was never much of a team player, but I did do fermentation from about that date forward, usually with a hydrometer and real beer or wine yeast.  And I ranged into distillation.  None of these activities were known to any adults......... I was clever and secretive...... 
         I had let things get out of control........... and it showed not only by my weight, but when I put on my electronic blood pressure cuff, the result matched the weight numbers........ or very nearly!!!
     
         I was going to die an early death..........or spend the rest of my life taking drugs!    I do NOT doctor, and never have, except for laceration repairs (stitches), or for antibiotics when I have something life threatening like Strep.   Neither alternative had any appeal to me.......... but death is the preferred option to joining the herd of folks who visit doctors and live on drugs........ otherwise known as poisons!
     
         I stopped eating that day............ and for 4 days, took a break of 48  hours, and resumed fasting.  I continued this for 110 total days of fasting, all in 3 to 4 day fasts.    The pounds melted away, and my eating habits changed.  Within a couple of months, my blood pressure was within an "acceptable range"....... Acceptable for my age.  I do not buy medical absolutes.......  roughly 130/85.   I continued my "program"........ and is is 100% mine.   I do NOT follow any defined program.   My policy was to fast, but pay attention to my body.  If the "signals" told me to break after 3 days.......... I did it.  If it was smooth sailing and I was feeling good, I might go 5 days.  Friends and relatives were horrified......."you are going to ruin your health"....... Utter nonsense!!   I do not do things with my eyes closed or ignore my body.   I reached my 50 pound target in early may, and have gained back the expected amount of about 6-7 lbs, and have been holding at that consistently....... about 158 +/-   I do have a target of about 10 lbs less, and plan to pursue it this spring.    During my fast, I walked every day......... I always have walked at least 2  miles a day through the woods on my own path.   I REFUSE TO WORK OUT OR HAVE ANYTHING TO DO WITH GYMs........  That stems from my hatred of my elementary school gym teacher I suspect.....but that is another and rather entertaining story.     "Hatred" is probably too strong a word.... I was a stubborn child, and could not be bullied either by my peers or adults.......  I never recognized a difference for all intents and purposes.    Backpacking in the mountains this summer was effortless.... I've always been strong and robust, but with the weight loss I was unstoppable.  
     
    ...........  I AM NOT A FASTING ADVOCATE.......  There is much benefit, and if you do your research you will find this to be true.  But it is NOT for everybody, just as Keto, or Atkins is not for everybody.  It was for me.  I was NOT willing to spend years clawing my weight down.  From what I have seen dieting does not work for most people.   Lifestyle change is critical, whatever path you take.    Fasting was for me... it may not be for you.   I have a contempt for the conventional medical "wisdom", and I am impervious to criticism when I am comfortable with my choices....... unless that criticism is based on solid facts.  It almost never is.   Folk wisdom, and the common knowledge is largely nonsense, and I've long recognized that.  This puts me at odds with most people, most of the time.    I was not willing to take years to achieve my goal... I'm strong, healthy, and determined... a survivor , who has relied on my own instinct in situations most folks never encounter, because I push the limits, and always have.    People often say "I couldn't do that".......  that's fine with me.  Do what you can.   
     
     
                                                                                            H.W.
  12. Like
    Owly got a reaction from ckreef in Nitro Covfefe   
    My childhood was far from ordinary.............  I have a LOT of stories 
  13. Like
    Owly got a reaction from ckreef in Nitro Covfefe   
    Oops..... forgive the misspelling.    
         This forum has no section for beverages........ Or at least I didn't see one.    I'm a home brewer from way back........... I think I brewed the first time in about '67.   My younger brother loves to tell the story of me beating a burlap sack of apples with my Louisville  Slugger in a washtub..........the truth is I never had such a bat, and he knows it, but it enhances the story.   He was 8 and I was 12, and this is  more or less a true story other than the non existent Louisville Slugger, and the apples were  Gravenstins not the Granny Smiths... which to my knowledge did not even exist back then or were as yet unknown.  We had an apple tree and a bing cherry tree in the back yard.   The juice thus extracted was bottled, and treated with bread yeast to make apple jack........    on the sly, as my folks were tea totalers.    We also made rootbeer from those powder mixes, and allowed them to ferment longer than was normally acceptable.   I later made wine from blackberries and strawberries, and eventually made beer from the only thing available in those days when brewing beer was ILLEGAL........ Hop flavored malt syrup.     Since those days I've brewed many hundreds of gallons of beer and wine, as well as making several stills including my  most recent that is a "convertible" that can be a pot or a reflux still.   
         I no longer brew beer........ I had to quit for health reasons, culminating in a weight loss program where I lost 50 lbs in about 5 months, and brought my blood pressure from about 190 down to 130 (systolic).   No doctors or medical supervision, etc.    
     
         I've been a coffee drinker since age 5........ but quit all forms of caffeine years ago.......... that's right, I drink decaf, and never touch any soft drinks.......... never have in my adult life.  
      
         Left over from brewing are 2 kegs, 1.75 gallon cornelius (soda) kegs, that fit perfectly on the top shelf in the fridge......... where "normal" folks keep milk   ;-).... One has carbonated water in it, and the other has had kombucha, but I just cleaned it, and did a custom installation of a stout faucet.... intended to be mounted behind a bar.   I built a small shaped bracket that bolts to one handle, and is welded to a thin steel plate that bolts down under the beer out connector.   I had to machine the connector on the bottom a bit to compensate for the thickness of the plate, and as I don't currently own a lathe, I simply chucked it in the drill press, and carefully used a grinder to shave a bit off the bottom, then cleaned up the threads with a deburring tool.     The faucet is way too tall of course, so I removed the stud where a tap handle is meant to go, and bolted a horizontal steel and wood handle on, which gives just enough clearance.   The long nozzle of a stout faucet surprisingly works....... an ordinary beer glass will slip under it.....not a tall one.    The stout faucet has a restricter plate with 5 tiny holes, designed for high pressure dispensing to give that creamy nitro effect.    I have nitrogen on hand all the time for refrigeration pressure testing (I own the bottle).    Today I installed a sintered stainless steel "carbonation stone" on the gas inlet, which has a short stem inside the keg.   I heated a plastic hose, and managed to slide it on, so the stone now lays in the bottom.      Nitrogen dissolves poorly in water, so the carbonation stone should help.   The protocol will be to begin with very low pressure, and gradually ramp it up over several  hours, ultimately ending up with about 60 psi serving pressure.
          I'm brewing my decaf cold brew using half a pound of Kroger decaf...... which is course ground, in a hop bag in a gallon of cold water.    I'll brew it for about 24 hours, then carefully filter it.   I'm thinking of doing a nitro mocha...............
     
    .............. Any ideas, wisdom borne of experience that anybody has to offer is welcome................
     
     
                                                                                                           Howard
     

  14. Like
    Owly got a reaction from ckreef in Meal in a Muffin / edible cupcake liners   
    My "meal in a muffin" is truly a full meal in a muffin or two....... Unfortunately it is so loaded with nuts and crasins and everything short of the kitchen sink that it does not hold together well.   Buckwheat groats, bran walnuts, apple chunks, dried fruit, etc......... You could live on them and at one time I knew a girl that did...... but that's another story.
     
         The problem has always been that the nuts and stuff were so large proportion compared to the batter, that they didn't hold up well......... crumbly.    In pursuit of a solution I looked at pie crust, rice paper, and puff pastry to line the cupcake tins......... None were entirely satisfactory.
     
         Enter the Portugese Custard Tart.........Find it on Utube..........The solution was the crust for these.    Recipe was 1 c flour and 1/3 c COLD water, and 1/4 t salt.  Mix into a sticky dough and use flour generously on your cutting board.... knead and let rest.     Roll it out into a rectangle, spread 2/3 of it with butter, leaving 1/2" edge margin.  Letter fold it and seal the edges, roll it out again and repeat.   Then roll it out, and spread butter over all of it except the edge margins, then roll it all up like a cinnamon roll, and refrigerate for an hour or so.   Slice it in half, and each half in half, and each of those quarters into .   One goes into each muffin tin, and with the cut side down / up.  With your thumbs, work it out and up the sides.  Then add your filling.  
         The result is a wonderful flaky crust around each muffin, somewhat like puff pastry, but much easier to work with.... It takes about a full stick of very soft butter to work....
  15. Like
    Owly got a reaction from lnarngr in Willow Smoke   
    Many years ago.. early '70's........ I discovered willow and maple for smoking.  It imparts a mild smoke flavor, and one can cut willow along almost any creek or river in the west at least..... I don't know about the east.  Willow and cottonwood often grow together and can be similar in appearance.  Willow as I'm talking of never grows to a tree, it grows in wet bottoms with stems from the ground with minimal branching.  It imparts a sweet mild flavor.
         The story is one of "young love" ........ eventually gone wrong, as love or more accurately "lust" often does ;-).   In the heat of passion in those days, I would propose a hiking trip on a lovely afternoon, and inevitably one or the other of us would decide we needed a couple of steaks..... We'd swing by Safeway, and grab a couple of T bones, and on the way out of town one or the other of us would remember matches, so we'd swing into the nearest bank and grab some book matches........ Free give aways everywhere in those days of smoking ( I never did, nor did any of my girlfriends.... I "culled" on that basis ruthlessly!!"... I'd already learned about kissing chimneys ;-)........ Surprisingly I was not slapped one day when I rather coarsely suggested to a smoker lady who found me attractive, that sex from behind was fine so long as I didn't have to kiss her!!  Needless to say she got the message that I was not interested  ............  I'm more of a "snag" these days (sensitive new age guy)....... read "more tactful".  
         Inevitably we'd end up out somewhere after a vigorous hike, combined with other "activities"....... ravenously hungry.... for FOOD.    A willow grill would be woven, a small fire built and allowed to burn down a bit, and as we had forgotten salt and pepper inevitably, I would throw heaps of willow branches and leaves on the coals.   Sweet smoke wafting over the meat would flavor it enough that salt was never missed.......The spice of sex I suspect had a lot to do with it     ..............  Ah the good old days.    I can take it or leave it now......... depending on the lady of course.   Knowing how wrong things can be.  
          Today I'm smoking a rack.  Beef prime rib trimmed by a restaurateur friend with willow collected on my daily walk to the post office a mile away..... through the woods...... Why did I wait so long to try it again?   It has that mild sweet smokey flavor of young love...... if one of those ladies is reading this..... perhaps we should try it again 
     
          In those days I took a pile of loose bricks and built a tiny fireplace behind my home on the river bank.......... I worked graveyard shift....... a shift I loved because I had  the entire day free!!  On the upstream edge of town, I often hiked and fished and waded upstream....... and back down, pulling out lovely pink fleshed trout.... and whitefish (generally considered trash fish here).  The tiny fireplace had a small chimney, and I would skewer the fish through the gills, and hang them in will or maple smoke from a small fire burned to coals and leaves piled on.   Cooked minimally...... only to tenderness, the grease (trout) would run out, and the tender flaky flesh would have a very mild smoke flavor........ perfect beyond words!!
     
    The Kamado allows me to duplicate SOME of this.  The willow experiment was a complete success, and I will repeat  it.
     
    Note that the ribs were sous vide cooked at 130 for several hours the other day and frozen.  They went into the Kamado frozen.   I currently have a Lamb roast........ also frozen in there...... I hate to waste charcoal!!   It was a gift, from the same friend.   Slow baked, my only object is to impart a bit of smoke......... a bit of "love" to it.    Nothing compares to the flavor of a lamb roast done properly IMHO.    My favorite is called "mutton" because it is several years old.... a healthy "weather" (castrated lamb) straight out of the  high mountains....... about 2-3 years old.  It has the maturity of flavor and marbling that "lamb" does not, and if properly cared for is mild, and wonderful............ but you cannot buy it.    Only a relationship with a sheep rancher who runs his sheep through the summer in the high mountains can supply it, and ONLY if you are a friend........ as they have no "market value" as "mutton" so they are butchered as lambs normally.    Few people have ever experienced this.......... I have spent my life around livestock and most of my friends are ranchers, and even they tend to have no idea what I am "raving " about......... as they tend to overcook everything.   Nothing is so offensive as overcooked sheep.   NEVER cook it beyond medium rare........ beyond that it continuously becomes more and more offensive.   DO IT RIGHT OR STAY HOME!!
     
     
     
     
                                                               H.W.
  16. Like
    Owly got a reaction from retfr8flyr in Please add my Grandson to your prayers!   
    On my prayer list......  At 64, I remember that age as the best years of my life, strong  capable, and fearless.   I was fortunate in having the parents I did.  They trusted me and let me run, instilled confidence, and gave me plenty of rope.    Good health, but I had to deal with bullies every day... At least they were tangible visible, and could be overcome with the resources bred into me.   I can't imagine having to tackle this kind of challenge at that age........... or this.   I've heard people criticize modern youth....they always have but I admire their strength fortitude and determination.  The future of humanity rests in their hands, and as far as I've seen, they rise to meet every challenge.   Have no doubt that he will rise to this challenge, and be a better man for it.
     
                                                                                                            H.W.
  17. Like
    Owly got a reaction from lnarngr in Bed of Nails   
    Problems with bird crap on my kamado table.   The starlings started using my new steel kamodo table for a roost and a toilet.    I cleaned it up and hauled it into the shop, ground it off and painted the top gloss black..... looks  nice, but I couldn't let the birds trash  it.   Took an aluminum sign, and cut it to the shape of the available surface, and epoxied a bunch of nails to it standing straight up.... decorative black twisted nails about 2.5" long.    It does the job, but this is NOT the way to do it.  It was difficult to make them all stand up, and keep them standing.  Next time I do something like this, I'll drill   holes for each nail.   I had to add more epoxy around each nail to make them solid.  It is very effective, looks menacing to me and to the birds
         I also welded a tab with a hole to the bottom of each leg of the support frame for the kamado and bolted it down solid.... the table is also bolted down to the deck.  We see 80+ mph winds every year here.
     
                                                                                                      H.W.
  18. Thanks
    Owly got a reaction from ndg_2000 in Making my own heat deflector plate   
    Beautiful .... exactly what I want!!   I'm very impressed with your project!!!!      Reminds me of my crucible furnace......... I bought "plastic" refractory cement.......... which is merely a term for refractory cement that is already hydrated and about the texture of clay........ Great Stuff........ You ram it in place instead of pouring.   My refractory supplier is EJ Bartells..........and excellent company IMHO.
     
                                                              H.W.
     
     
     
  19. Like
    Owly got a reaction from gander2112 in Stacking Racks   
    I smoked two half racks of pork ribs yesterday evening for about 4 hours in my 10" kamado.   Needless to say I didn't have enough space.    These were done sous vide first, and went into the kamado frozen with mesquite chunks on the coals.   Temp kept down under 200F.    They were frozen together on top of each other to start with, and I cut two pieces of pine lumber, which I charred over the propane cooktop, and used to space them apart once they thawed enough to separate.  Each side ended up on the bottom for about an hour (4 sides of course as there were 2 racks).  Once an hour, I juggled things about.  The spacers allowed the smoke to pass all the way around everything.  It worked quite well. Of course I had my home made deflector plate underneath, and was wise enough to wrap it in aluminum this time....
     
                               H.W.
  20. Thanks
    Owly got a reaction from lnarngr in Proportional Integrative Derivitive Controller   
    The logical solution would be
     
     
    The very rapid cycling would effectively give a variable speed.  The PID is capable of cycling in milliseconds, much like a PWM control, and it also is a "learning" system, that changes cycle frequency to stabilize the temp, anticipating the results based on "learning".  It is NOT a stupid thermostat that simply turns the power on and off at fixed set points.      People seem to be programming microprocessors for this..... A PID is already a microprocessor, and already programmed to "think on it's feet".     
     
        There might be wild fluctuations initially..........but they would level out fairly quickly.
     
    simplified Utube Video of PID temp controller
     
     
                                                        H.W.
  21. Thanks
    Owly got a reaction from lnarngr in Proportional Integrative Derivitive Controller   
    Back when I was brewing, and doing some other things related to brewing, which I will not discuss here..... I discovered the PID temp controller.   PIDs are "intelligent", and do not simply turn on and off at a set point, but determine the effect over time of on and off periods, and ultimately anticipate the results of on and off cycles, modulating the on and off times to hold temps very close.  A learning controller you might say..........
         In brewing these are typically used for controlling a heating element, and this is generally done using a solid state relay.   There is no reason this could not be used to control a brushless fan.....     such as a computer fan.   Most computer fans are axial, but they are also available in centrifugal, which means that you could easily direct the flow into your lower air control.  
     
        The best part of this is that a PID with thermocouple and solid state relay can be had on Amazon for a mere $18, and a 12 volt computer fan suitable for the job can be had on Ebay for around $7.00.... all including shipping.  All you need is a "wall wart" to run the fan.......... and some wiring.     If you don't have a 12 volt "wall wart" lying about .... another $8 on AMZN..... or pick one up at the thrift shop for a dollar!!
     
         You can use the system to control your kamado temp............or your mash temp for brewing, or the temp in the top of your reflux column............ or, whatever.   
     
     
                                                                        H.W.
  22. Like
    Owly got a reaction from cmospyder in Fasting for Survival   
    Last year in December, I stepped on a scale, and registered 202....... which for my 5'6" (actually I've shrunk to 5'5" (age 64)).......... is far too much.   I've spent most of my life in the range or about 180... which is still to heavy.   I had taken up home brewing........ doing about one brew a week (2 - 3 gallons).   I love to brew, and I've been brewing beer and wine since I was in my early teens.  My brother loves to tell the story about me with my Louisville slugger.... and apples in a burlap sack, at age 12 pulverizing the apples to make apple jack.......... the truth is that I NEVER owned a Louisville  Slugger.... It was a cheap bat, and I was never much of a team player, but I did do fermentation from about that date forward, usually with a hydrometer and real beer or wine yeast.  And I ranged into distillation.  None of these activities were known to any adults......... I was clever and secretive...... 
         I had let things get out of control........... and it showed not only by my weight, but when I put on my electronic blood pressure cuff, the result matched the weight numbers........ or very nearly!!!
     
         I was going to die an early death..........or spend the rest of my life taking drugs!    I do NOT doctor, and never have, except for laceration repairs (stitches), or for antibiotics when I have something life threatening like Strep.   Neither alternative had any appeal to me.......... but death is the preferred option to joining the herd of folks who visit doctors and live on drugs........ otherwise known as poisons!
     
         I stopped eating that day............ and for 4 days, took a break of 48  hours, and resumed fasting.  I continued this for 110 total days of fasting, all in 3 to 4 day fasts.    The pounds melted away, and my eating habits changed.  Within a couple of months, my blood pressure was within an "acceptable range"....... Acceptable for my age.  I do not buy medical absolutes.......  roughly 130/85.   I continued my "program"........ and is is 100% mine.   I do NOT follow any defined program.   My policy was to fast, but pay attention to my body.  If the "signals" told me to break after 3 days.......... I did it.  If it was smooth sailing and I was feeling good, I might go 5 days.  Friends and relatives were horrified......."you are going to ruin your health"....... Utter nonsense!!   I do not do things with my eyes closed or ignore my body.   I reached my 50 pound target in early may, and have gained back the expected amount of about 6-7 lbs, and have been holding at that consistently....... about 158 +/-   I do have a target of about 10 lbs less, and plan to pursue it this spring.    During my fast, I walked every day......... I always have walked at least 2  miles a day through the woods on my own path.   I REFUSE TO WORK OUT OR HAVE ANYTHING TO DO WITH GYMs........  That stems from my hatred of my elementary school gym teacher I suspect.....but that is another and rather entertaining story.     "Hatred" is probably too strong a word.... I was a stubborn child, and could not be bullied either by my peers or adults.......  I never recognized a difference for all intents and purposes.    Backpacking in the mountains this summer was effortless.... I've always been strong and robust, but with the weight loss I was unstoppable.  
     
    ...........  I AM NOT A FASTING ADVOCATE.......  There is much benefit, and if you do your research you will find this to be true.  But it is NOT for everybody, just as Keto, or Atkins is not for everybody.  It was for me.  I was NOT willing to spend years clawing my weight down.  From what I have seen dieting does not work for most people.   Lifestyle change is critical, whatever path you take.    Fasting was for me... it may not be for you.   I have a contempt for the conventional medical "wisdom", and I am impervious to criticism when I am comfortable with my choices....... unless that criticism is based on solid facts.  It almost never is.   Folk wisdom, and the common knowledge is largely nonsense, and I've long recognized that.  This puts me at odds with most people, most of the time.    I was not willing to take years to achieve my goal... I'm strong, healthy, and determined... a survivor , who has relied on my own instinct in situations most folks never encounter, because I push the limits, and always have.    People often say "I couldn't do that".......  that's fine with me.  Do what you can.   
     
     
                                                                                            H.W.
  23. Like
    Owly reacted to TKOBBQ in Interesting article   
    https://www.engadget.com/2019/10/25/harvard-barbecue-desora-kamado-joe-cinder-grills/
  24. Like
    Owly reacted to ndg_2000 in Making my own heat deflector plate   
  25. Like
    Owly got a reaction from Rip in Making my own heat deflector plate   
    The problem is size..... this is a 10" grill (actual grill dimension), which means that the deflector cannot be much more than 6"....... I'm beginning to become aware the  liabilities of going small........ but I have no use for a large grill.    Today I plasma cut a 6" circle of 1/4" plate for a first try....... I'll use it tomorrow on a chuck that I did sous vide on already.... I want smoke, and low heat.
        I have many great and ambitious ideas..... unfortunately often the shortest distance between two points is the path I take....... too much to do!!   This afternoon I made up a stand for my porch, to raise the kombodo to working height...... I still hope to so something more elegant, but I  had a pile of glavanized steel plate, and 6x8 square tubing from a rebuild of guardrails....... Guess what.  I chopped a tube down to 30", and welded two plates....... top and bottom, punched 6 holes with the mag-drill so I could fasten the komodo down....... we see 80mph+ winds every year....... The whole project took about 2 hrs, and I'm not unrealistic enough to imagine that it will not remain my grilling platform for the next few years........ always too much to do!!
     
                                                       H.W.
×
×
  • Create New...