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adm

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  1. Like
    adm got a reaction from KismetKamado in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  2. Like
    adm got a reaction from eric in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  3. Like
    adm got a reaction from BlacknTan in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  4. Like
    adm got a reaction from Ron5850 in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  5. Like
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  6. Like
    adm got a reaction from buckleybj in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  7. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from EZ smoke in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  8. Like
    adm got a reaction from BURGER MEISTER in Just some more burgers....   
    This might be a bit on an information rich post, so I apologise in advance....
     
    Anyway. For some reason, large sweet onions are difficult to find around here. Regular brown cooking onions, shallots, little baby pickling onions etc, easy as pie but I go months without seeing big sweet onions. But yesterday my local store had some really nice ones for some unknown reason.
     
    So I bought one. An of course, if you have a sweet onion, you really need a good burger to show it off. So I went to the butcher 50 feet down the street and he had some lovely looking short rib. So I bought some of that. Then I finished up with brioche buns, lettuce, tomato and potatoes to make chips.
     
    This morning, the beef came out of the fridge. I took the bones off for the dogs and then chopped it up.
     

     

     
    Then I chucked it in the freezer for an hour and then gave it one pass through the mincer using a 1/4" plate
     

     
    After that, I turned them into burgers. No seasoning, no breadcrumbs, just 100% pure short rib
     

     
    Finally, I grilled them up on the cast iron half moon. 450F with no heat deflector between the griddle and coals. 4 minutes per side. The crust came out beautifully and the Maillard reaction turned all that lovely fat into flavour.
     

     
    Finally, assembled and eaten!
     

     

     
    Very tasty indeed!
     
     
     
  9. Like
    adm got a reaction from buckleybj in Complete Menus that have worked well   
    When we have a group of people round, I'll typically do a Menu that works with the temperature profile of the Kamado - so starting low and slow and getting higher.
     
    For example an overnight smoke of pulled pork or brisket for the main protein - alongside with a pan of baked beans bubbling away underneath. Then while that's relaxing in the cooler I'll heat the grill up and make some chicken wings and maple glazed chipolatas for starters. While those are cooking I would prep some cold cuts and cheese and some chips and guacamole
     
    Then maybe a side of salmon cooked for crispy skin on the cast iron griddle, plus some asparagus or other roasted veg. Typically a big dish of creamy, buttery mashed potatoes or some baby new potatoes - these are done in the kitchen oven or on the hob.
     
    As for the deserts, I leave those to my wife!
     
    So a full menu might look like:
     
    Starters
    Chicken wings
    Maple glazed chipolatas
    Cold cuts (typically nice Italian salamis and parma ham) and cheese
    Chips and guacamole
     
    Mains
    Pulled pork
    Grilled salmon
    Mashed potatoes
    BBQ beans
    Grilled vegetables
    Salad(s)
     
    Deserts
    Some form of fancy cheesecake
    Profiteroles
  10. Like
    adm reacted to Ron5850 in Sausage and Spinach Soup   
    I started out heating up my Dutch oven on the Big Joe.  Then, I added sausage to the hot pot for a few minutes.  Next, I added one clove of minced garlic and two sliced carrots.  Once the vegetables began to soften, I added six cups of chicken broth.  Once the broth started to broil, I stirred the Yukon gold potatoes.  I partially covered the soup and simmered until the potatoes were tender.  Once the potatoes were tender, I threw in a pinch of red pepper and a handful of fresh spinach.  Lastly, stirred and served.  






  11. Like
    adm got a reaction from Ron5850 in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  12. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from Rob_grill_apprentice in Baguettes De Tradition   
    They look really good!
  13. Like
    adm got a reaction from daninpd in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  14. Like
    adm got a reaction from TKOBBQ in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  15. Like
    adm got a reaction from KJKiley in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  16. Like
    adm got a reaction from Nnank76 in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  17. Like
    adm got a reaction from JeffieBoy in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  18. Like
    adm got a reaction from Brick Pig in Spicy Pasta e Fagioli with Rotisserie Smoked Chicken   
    Looks lovely - and your rotisserie chicken looks beautifully moist.
  19. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from SeaBrisket in What is the secret to Jess Pryles' perfect porchetta skin?   
    I would say that you absolutely need the pork skin to be perfectly dry. If your pork is vac packed, then take it out the day before and leave it to dry out uncovered in the fridge.
     
    This might sound stupid - but I have seen a lot of pork joints that don't have the skin on them,. You absolutely need the hard "rind" to be successful. If you just have a fat layer, then it won't be crackling! On a big piece of pork belly, expect to see a nipple or two and potentially some hairs.
     
    Then there's the slicing of the skin. You need a proper sharp knife (a "Stanley" disposable blade DIY knife or similar is perfect) and you need to cut right through the skin into the fat layer.
     
    Finally.....salt. Just before you put the thing on to cook rub some good quality sea salt into the cuts.
     
    As above, if I were cooking this in the oven I would go full heat for 20 minutes and then turn the oven down to 320F until properly cooked.
     
    On a Kamado, this is harder - but I would probably start with the grill at 450- 500F then immediately shut the vents almost totally closed and let the temperature slowly drop over an hour or so until it hit 320-350. You could also try starting low and gradually increasing the temperate over the cooking time to end up around 500F.

    Maybe experiment first with some boned and rolled loin or shoulder of pork rather than going through the fuss of making a porchetta.

    Either way, you'll have tasty fun figuring it out!
  20. Like
    adm got a reaction from ckreef in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  21. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in Green Chili Stew   
    That looks great - and is now on my list if I can ever find those kind of peppers here in the UK.
     
    Maybe I'll just grow my own next year....
     
  22. Like
    adm got a reaction from BURGER MEISTER in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  23. Like
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in French Onion Soup   
    One thing I forgot to add.....
     
    Calvados. Or cognac, or any brandy really.
     
    Splash a glug of it in the bottom of each bowl before you add the soup/croutons/cheese. 
  24. Like
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in French Onion Soup   
    A bistro classic that seems to have fallen out of favour over the years....
     
    First off melt a load of good French salted butter and add a load of sliced onions. Let these cook down and caramelise for several hours. This was at about 340F for three hours.
     

     

     

     
    Then stir in some plain flour, some fresh thyme, balsamic vinegar, and cook for a few minutes. Then gradually add in beef stock and hard cider. Preferably Normandy cider if you can get it. Let this all simmer for an hour of so stirring occasionally.
     

     
    Once that's done, slice up some baguette and toast lightly on both sides. Then rub each side with a split clove of garlic. Spoon the onion soup into bowls, float a couple of croutons on top of each one then cover in grated cheese. I used Gruyere and Compte. Then put the bowls under the grill until the cheese is melted and bubbling.
     

     
    In fairness, it's not the most photogenic of soups but it does taste most excellent. Especially with a nice bottle of Cote du Rhone or similar.....
     
     
     
     
  25. Like
    adm got a reaction from philpom in Ranch hand bean soup - open pit   
    That looks really tasty. And the open fire and original pot is a nice touch too.
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