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adm

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  1. Like
    adm got a reaction from Lumpy_Coal in Gravy on Kamado?   
    What he says!

    I did a spatchcocked Turkey last week, and that was my original plan, but I ended up putting the bird on a rack over a sheet pan as in the picture below. (You can see another drip pan underneath - which was the original plan. This was set up off the heat deflectors...) The sheet pan was full of onions, carrots and celery and some sprigs of thyme and sage. I then added a bottle of white wine.
     

     
    I cooked the turkey for 2 hours and the juices from the bird mingled with the wine and veggies came out great. I got a bit fancy and made a separate turkey stock with the giblets, backbone, neck and more veggies, then combined that with the pan juices and a roux to finish the gravy off.
  2. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from JeffieBoy in New Year's Day.....Beef Rib.   
    Just sayin'.....
     

     

     
     

     

     

     

     
     
    There's going to be some good roast beef sandwiches tomorrow....
     
     
     
     
  3. Like
    adm got a reaction from BURGER MEISTER in New Year's Day.....Beef Rib.   
    Just sayin'.....
     

     

     
     

     

     

     

     
     
    There's going to be some good roast beef sandwiches tomorrow....
     
     
     
     
  4. Like
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in New Year's Day.....Beef Rib.   
    Just sayin'.....
     

     

     
     

     

     

     

     
     
    There's going to be some good roast beef sandwiches tomorrow....
     
     
     
     
  5. Confused
    adm got a reaction from Beermachine in New Year's Day.....Beef Rib.   
    Just sayin'.....
     

     

     
     

     

     

     

     
     
    There's going to be some good roast beef sandwiches tomorrow....
     
     
     
     
  6. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from Duke_Kaboom in Gravy on Kamado?   
    What he says!

    I did a spatchcocked Turkey last week, and that was my original plan, but I ended up putting the bird on a rack over a sheet pan as in the picture below. (You can see another drip pan underneath - which was the original plan. This was set up off the heat deflectors...) The sheet pan was full of onions, carrots and celery and some sprigs of thyme and sage. I then added a bottle of white wine.
     

     
    I cooked the turkey for 2 hours and the juices from the bird mingled with the wine and veggies came out great. I got a bit fancy and made a separate turkey stock with the giblets, backbone, neck and more veggies, then combined that with the pan juices and a roux to finish the gravy off.
  7. Like
    adm got a reaction from JeffieBoy in Christmas Turkey!   
    Merry Christmas!
     
    I currently have a 16lb turkey sitting in a citrus brine here. I'll pull it out in the morning, then leave it in the fridge to air dry until Christmas morning. Then it's getting spatchcocked and cooked on the Kamado.  I'm going to put a big roasting tray full of root veggies and white wine on top of the heat defectors so the juices drip into it.....
     
    Pics to come...
  8. Like
    adm got a reaction from JeffieBoy in Christmas Turkey!   
    Actually - I did end up spatchcocking it once I took it out of the brine this morning. The backbone and giblets along with assorted vegetables, herbs and stuff are simmering away to make stock as we speak. Some for gravy, some to go in the roasting pan under the turkey with the wine.
     
    I'm going to use the same ceramic feet that I use with my pizza stone to keep the roasting tray off the heat deflector......and oh yes - there will be garlic and herbs and stuff.
     
    I am currently making stuffing with pork sausage meat, chestnuts, onion, herbs....
  9. Like
    adm got a reaction from philpom in The perfect ribeye?   
    Lovely!
     
  10. Like
    adm got a reaction from Tongmaster in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  11. Like
    adm got a reaction from Jack. in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  12. Like
    adm got a reaction from daninpd in Duck   
    If you steam it ahead of time, some of the fat will render out. Then leave it uncovered in the fridge overnight for the skin to dry out. Put some Kosher salt and pepper on it and cook on the Kamado and you will have wonderful crispy skin. I would personally do it hot and fast rather than slow smoked. Maybe around 450F for 30 minutes (or longer if you didn't steam it first)
     
    Unless of course, what you actually want is smoked duck breast - in which case, low and slow. But no crispy skin.
     
    By the way - this method works excellently for chicken wings as well if you can be bothered.....
     
    A nice orange or cherry sauce would work most excellently with it.
     
    And it will render out quite a lot of fat - so make sure to use a drip tray.
     
    Oh - and @cameronleespencerCameron, duck confit. Fantastic! One of my favourite foods of all time. Enjoy.
     
     
  13. Like
    adm got a reaction from JeffieBoy in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  14. Like
    adm got a reaction from Ronnie9 in What am I doing wrong?   
    :-) I am also in the UK, so I can definitely imagine your joy! I recommend a garden parasol to keep you a little drier - and an LED worklamp on a stand which can be had from Toolstation for £36. That way you can stay dry and see what you are doing....
     
    A remote thermometer is also a wonderful thing as you don't need to go out to check. If I am cooking a pork shoulder I normally don't wrap it at all and will not open the dome once between putting it on and around30 minutes before it is done. Don't open the dome to spritz or anything like that - just put the meat on and leave it alone. "If you're looking, you ain't cooking".
     
    As for the cut of pork, exactly what you are looking for is a "neck end pork shoulder with the blade bone left in and the spine removed". Rind off - but keep the rind to make crackling. This cut of meat will typically run about 5kg and you'll need to speak to a proper butcher to get good quality cut the way you want it. You do want to leave the fat cap on.
     
    I cook at 110-130C until the internal temperature reaches 85-90C, then pull it and the latent heat will take it to 95C. Leave it to rest at least 30 minutes before you want to eat.
     
    Finally, you need to leave plenty of time. For a 5K piece, I will normally put it on the Kamado around 10 or 11pm. It will normally be done somewhere around midday the next day. When it's done, I wrap it in a double layer of foil, then some towels and then leave it to rest in an insulated cooler. It will stay hot like this for hours, and will be perfect for a meal around 3-6pm which gives you plenty of time to make sides etc....
     
     
  15. Like
    adm got a reaction from daninpd in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  16. Like
    adm got a reaction from skreef in Rustic Autumn 5 Course Meal   
    I missed this the first time round - but it looks great.
     
    Grilled cheesecake is a whole new one to me. Tell me more....
  17. Like
    adm got a reaction from BURGER MEISTER in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  18. Like
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  19. Like
    adm got a reaction from KismetKamado in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  20. Like
    adm got a reaction from Rob_grill_apprentice in Fillet steak with Pink Peppercorn Sauce   
    A month or so ago I got a chance to pick up an entire beef fillet at an exceptional price, so I did.....and stuck it in the freezer. This weekend our eldest child came home from University, so I took it out and we have dined on beef fillet all weekend.
     
    The meat itself was Spanish, and unlike the young meat we tend to get here in the UK, this was from a retired milking cow about 8 years old. Once they are done as milkers, they put them out to pasture in the hills of Galicia and leave them to graze and reach a ripe old age. They get somewhat chubby and lay down some nice marbling and amazing flavour. Fillet can tend to be a little tasteless, but this is not the case here.
     
    Anyway....for the Saturday, I made Beef Wellington with half of the fillet which went down really well. Sadly, no Kamado involved.
     
    Then yesterday I cut the rest into steaks (I have saved about 8 ounces to make a spicy Thai Beef Salad with this evening). I made up a pink peppercorn sauce using all the trimmings from the fillet, shallots, brandy, beef stock, pink peppercorns and cream. Then I grilled up the fillets at about 700F. My wife made her famous chips (fries) and we had a nice green salad. 
     
    Served up with a bottle of 2009 Beaune Premier Cru it was a wonderful way to finish off the fillet!
     

     

  21. Like
    adm got a reaction from rwolf10 in More Soup: Prawn & Chicken Curry Laksa   
    This one took a while. Three days in total, but it was super tasty.
     
    First off, I made up an Asian style chicken stock. Chicken carcass, star anise, ginger, scallions, onion, peppercorns and garlic. This got about 5 hours slowly bubbling away. 
     


     
    Once that was ready, I strained it through a muslin, fed the chicken parts to the dogs and put the stock in the freezer.
     
    The next day, I made the Laksa paste. This has lots of ginger, onions, garlic, dried and fresh chillies, lemon grass and spices. The brown blocky bits in the photo below are belachan - which is Indonesian fermented shrimp paste. It stinks a bit, but it adds lovely flavour.
     

     

     
    That all gets blended up and then fried for about 30 minutes stirring constantly. I did this on the indoor hob as stirring constantly in the rain on my Kamado wasn't part of the plan that day!
     
    You end up with something like this. The cooked paste then needs to go into the fridge for 24+ hours for all the flavours to meld properly.
     

     
    When that's all done, to make the actual soup I took the stock I had made, plus the paste, plus two cans of coconut milk, palm sugar, tamarind paste, more lemon grass and a load of "Laksa leaves", otherwise known as "hot mint" or "Vietnamese coriander". This is a plant called Persicaria odorata which is a staple in Vietnamese cooking - and apparently in Laksa as well. Who knew? Luckily, I already have it growing in my herb garden.
     
    Let this all simmer for a while on the Kamado
     

     
    At this point, it was dark outside and raining again. But we are pretty much done now. So inside we go again.
     
    To assemble the dish itself, you need to blanch off some noodles, shrimp, beansprouts, green beans. I also poached a chicken breast and added some fried tofu puffs to my soup broth. Then pour the hot broth over the rest of the ingredients in the bowls and served piping hot. Oh - and add half a soft boiled egg, plus some fresh chilli to taste.
     

  22. Thanks
    adm got a reaction from JeffieBoy in Random Pictures Thread - John Setzler   
    Here's my random picture of the day....not cooked on the Kamado, but Beef Wellington with a chestnut mushroom Duxelles:
     



     
  23. Like
    adm got a reaction from Golf Griller in Random Pictures Thread - John Setzler   
    Here's my random picture of the day....not cooked on the Kamado, but Beef Wellington with a chestnut mushroom Duxelles:
     



     
  24. Like
    adm got a reaction from TKOBBQ in Random Pictures Thread - John Setzler   
    Here's my random picture of the day....not cooked on the Kamado, but Beef Wellington with a chestnut mushroom Duxelles:
     



     
  25. Like
    adm got a reaction from Jack. in Random Pictures Thread - John Setzler   
    Here's my random picture of the day....not cooked on the Kamado, but Beef Wellington with a chestnut mushroom Duxelles:
     



     
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