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Webber_Grills

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Posts posted by Webber_Grills

  1. 44 minutes ago, Chris Topher said:

     

    what about the sharks? or the lions?

     

    we may be near the top of the food chain, but a tiny irukandji jellyfish can kill an adult human. And, as we've all learned over the last year, that a simple virus (which is barely in the category of a life form and some debate that it is not a life form and merely a biological chemical) has the capability of wiping out an entire civilization.

     

    Back to topic of impossible meat, I haven't tried it and have no desire to do so. If placed in front of me, I'd probably try it out of curiosity. Given the choice between a fresh home-made veggie burger (with visible chunks of beans, carrots, rice, oats, onion, peppers, etc.) and any meat-based burger, I'd go for the veggie burger every time. My preference is to celebrate the vegetables rather than try to make a plant-based meal taste like a meat-based meal. YMMV, of course.

    I'm with you on preferring to have non-meat meals that are that way "on purpose" rather than imitating a meat meal

     

    But, we have vegetarian friends who are glad for having better options of "mock meats" for things like group get togethers - if only so they don't have to stand out as different, and they can also just scarf down a couple of burgers like anyone else rather than being limited to sides and salads

     

    I get that. 

     

    They also explained that "mock meats" tend to be the more social dishes, since there are a lot of people who want to "pass" at a backyard bbq, but not so many who want to pretend at home with the rest of their meals

  2. 8 hours ago, KamadoJor said:

    Increased stability is a plus, really. We have a lot of wind over here and it does influence the heat. I used to have my Junior in a semi-closed wooden table, but sold that, because it was taking up too much space. Now that I have another toddler running around, I'm looking to buy a table again. He seems to be really fond of the Joe Junior, which is great  :bravo: but I can't have him touching it when it's hot of course. 

     

    If only these cabinets had wheels, it would be perfect for my use case.

    You could definitely track down casters that would screw into the height adjustment stems, but It would likely need additional support to keep everything squared up in motion. Racking does make the walls buckle a bit, but they are solid once installed. Maybe a bar from caster to caster on the bottom would get it strong as hell....

  3. 1 hour ago, Brandon Store said:

    Dojoe isnt meant for those temps. Max is 700F. If you want the 930F pizza Roccbox is an excellent choice. I have one and enjoy it alot. I do prefer Dojoe for when I want American pizzeria style. In my opinion it does that very well. (Especially if you have a big joe and stretch out a 16 inch pie)

    Another good option - without buying another cooker - is to get a kettle pizza attachment. I have one semi-permanently set up on my 18 inch Weber Jumbo Joe, although I can also move the bolts and put it on my bigger 26. With a good stone/steel, it will easily hit those quick cook times for Neapolitan.

     

    Nothing wrong with the ones I make on my KJ Jr though

     

    Now, if only I had a good picture where I didn't completely screw up the launch

     

    IMG_5096.thumb.jpeg.c2f2adfe3134d9e060e2361ef6c48845.jpegIMG_5088.thumb.jpeg.c0ad3c9a6ef56ced8d7bea3dc9a2e5a8.jpegIMG_5092.thumb.jpeg.571d0bdc39f30e18106ed1743556c053.jpeg

  4. 2 minutes ago, CeramicTool said:

    Very cool. More for Woods, but the science remains the same. Again, this only introduces more questions ;)

     

    Like, I already own a Thermapen IR (and MK4), BUT, if I fork out for a high temp Thermoworks IR gun, is it as simple as pointing the gun at the charcoal? Does the white ash layer interfere with readings? I assume yes, the glowing red is the hottest part!?!?

     

    I'm thinking this is a viable path to perfection. I've asked myself before the relationship of bottom damper to top damper, and come up retarded. 

     

    This article articulates that there is a proper temperature:

     

    "Thin blue smoke is the result of a equilibrium (fuel, oxygen, heat) being achieved and the burning process being deemed efficient. In this state the fuel in the woods carbonize or caramelize which results in thin blue smoke."

     

    So Im thinking out loud and asking for rebuttals and corrections when I say: the airflow relationship between the top and bottom vents should be used to produce the best smoke flavor. Many positions can hold a grate temperature, but only one optimal position holds a grate temperature AND allows for optimal smoke.

     

    Thoughts? This gets into another area entirely, airflow and dampers, which I really don't understand, so please school me by correcting my thoughts.

     

     

    That's a rabbit hole I've found myself down many times, and definitely is going to be different between wood, charcoal kettle, Kamado...

     

    My thoughts? Keep a small spot hot in the fire. Feed enough air on the intake for it to be clean but not enough to encourage it to spread. Keep the top damper as open as you can without getting too hot or closing the bottom completely (you still want an upwards flow) 

     

    For me, that's open a knats testicle on the bottom and all the way open on top, but sometimes, I end up closing the top to 3/4 or so. Not the usual 1-finger many others recommend. I want my smoke to kiss the meat and get out without ever lingering. But that's a matter of taste.

     

    You can go nuts measuring charcoal temp on an IR, but it would likely work (ish). I prefer to think concept, and see it as an explanation why a small hot fire is better than a larger cooler one - despite the overall pit temp being the same

  5. 8 hours ago, CeramicTool said:

    What about this idea I heard about charcoal burning off a nasty tasting smoke when first lit? and that once charcoal has turned red and then cooled down the bad stuff is already burnt out so its fine to just light and go? Ive mostly ignored this idea, but its in the back of my head to understand what was meant, and what circumstances it applies in.

     

    What temperature approximately is the threshold for having charcoal light itself again when adding oxygen? obviously the temperature of the air makes a difference, so lets just say on an 80ish f degree day. Am I correct in assuming that there is a temperature below which something happens, but there is not enough energy to make the charcoal hotter, just generate some heat and prolong the cooldown time? or is it an activation/no activation equation without an in between?

     

    This sounds like it answers my question RE bad smoke above, its generated from a low burn temperature, not from anything in the charcoal that needs to be burned off?

     

    Also, good explaination! The C + O2 form a gas, which spontaneously combusts in the presence of enough heat?

    Basically, but it’s just as important to understand which different compounds are burning because each is a part of the flavour profile.

     

    If there is not enough air for the volume of fuel gas being released by the solid fuel, you are tasting those gasses. If it is burning efficiently, you are tasting the fuel “post burn” which is entirely different 

     

    This here is a good deep dive

     

    https://barbecuefaq.com/thin-blue-smoke/

     

     

  6. 1 hour ago, MD_Ag said:

    1) C + O2 -> CO2, Heat of formation = -393.5 kJ/mol

     

    2) Once the oxygen in a closed kamado is used up, it's gone until the vents or hinge are opened to allow more in. The thermal energy generated during combustion will in part stay in the unburned charcoal, serving as a source of the activation energy needed to begin combustion once oxygen is reintroduced, or until normal thermodynamic equilibrium is established with the surroundings (i.e. it cools down).

     

    3) It's out once it no longer has the activation energy.

     

    4) Answered above. Try not to overshoot.

    Activation energy.... I had so much trouble with that in college...

     

    great explanations!

     

    heat + fuel + oxygen. All are required. Remove one, fire stops. Add it back while the other two are ready to go, and there’s a strong likelihood that it’s coming back. 
     

    As for temperature surfing, the best way to have good clean burn is to have a small amount of fuel burning hot instead of a lot of your fuel smouldering because it’s just barely getting air. Start in one spot, it will favour itself before spreading because it has to convert the solid fuel to gas before consuming it. 

  7. 39 minutes ago, KamadoJor said:

    That looks great! What do you do with the door when grilling? Keep it open or closed?

    Thank you!

     

     I can get to any temperature with the door shut - perhaps because there are two round holes in the back that I left unplugged (they are for the sink variant) 

     

    I actually find it even more stable on a windy day, likely because it prevents gusts from affecting intake airflow

  8. 10 hours ago, daninpd said:

    I thought the thought police around here was about politics.  I don't consider IQ to be political.  I guess I'll find out.

    Considering IQ to be political is political because it assumes the other side is dumb

     

    and let’s be honest, there are more than enough dumb idiots to go around 

  9. 30 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

    Covid Fun Fact: We found out that KN95 masks are actually washable, by mistake. I had a used mask in my pocket and meant to throw it away, but forgot. The shirt went in the wash, and when she unloaded the washing machine my wife found it. It was in tact and clean, she set it out to air dry. It came out almost new.  Who knew:)

    IMG_1698.thumb.jpeg.ab7dab6e207ad79516415130b1af2ff3.jpeg

    IMG_1699.thumb.jpeg.4b27c885a82d13b7e9d2f9249f475f9b.jpeg

    As a woodworker, I can tell you that the filter loses some of its capabilities but still tends to work well enough to be worth washing when its shot

     

    I can barely smell the wood dust with a new one, but can smell stronger with a washed one, but don't get dust boogers. Guess is that the holes get ripped open a bit wider than N95 spec

  10. 18 minutes ago, gadgetlover said:

    That's useful, thanks.  I think perhaps going for the big Joe for increased flexibility, knowing that it will take longer and therefore will be for use at weekends, whilst keeping his current BBQ for quick week night meals (and yes perhaps up adding in a classic or junior in a few years, since our wee boy will obviously need his own to braii with dad :lol:)

    The wee bairn can grow into a Weber Jumbo Joe or a Kamado Joe Jr (a nice second Kamado for a reasonable price) 

     

    My son is 8 and has reached the point where I can have him clear the ashes from the previous cook, pile the charcoal, and light it

     

    Inside, he makes sauces and prepares rub on meats

     

    Started him out when he was about 4 with a plastic "lettuce knife" (looks like a serrated chef knife) and a paring knife with a blunted tip. Knowing the rules of when and where to keep fingers near a cutting board was the first lesson

     

    By next year, he will be making dinner at least one evening a week. My parents did it to me, and I'm glad for it

  11. 2 hours ago, gadgetlover said:

    Eeek... more choice! Can I ask what the main differences between the Monolith and KJ are?  Would the accessories like the Joetisserie and dojoe work on the Monolith (or do they have their own version?). I was planning on buying a bundle with all available accessories as I do love the faff around with gadgetry :lol:

     

    There will most definitely be vast quantities of steak and boerewors!

    That's a dangerous goal - if you include 3rd party stuff, there is a LOT if available kit for KJ. Almost as bad (good?) as Weber for choice

     

     

  12. 4 minutes ago, JeffieBoy said:

    I bought mine at a Hardware store in Michigan.  My Sales rep in Sarnia crosses over weekly at least (pre pandemic).  He offered to grab one and carry it to my office.  It was great.  $129 USD on sale, no shipping or HST... delivered to my desk. Gotta love friends!  

    BTW - He did the same for a Carbon Fibre Bike that I bought in California.  Free shipping via Fedex within USA.  Shipped it to his drop box in Port Huron. He carried it back and delivered it.  He thought I got ripped off, the box was so light.

     

    They are also available at Home Depot over the border.  Most likely not stocked, but they will ship to the closest store to you.  I just looked them up at HomeDepot.com.

    Alas. Maybe when this is all over. I have a mailing address in upstate NY but can't get to it

  13. Portable? Only one?

     

    Weber Jumbo Joe. Light enough to be easily transported, not going to shatter if (when) I knock it over, tons of accessories for the 18 inch size, and easily modified to suit my needs

     

    A portable pellet has a place

    So does a small Kamado

     

    But 18 inches of goodness, with a slow n sear inside.... if I'm stuck with one, that's the one for meIMG_6080.thumb.jpeg.924b23586d556522970f98ca77385cc5.jpeg

  14. 51 minutes ago, Rick in Ontario said:

    The current craze of vegetable based protien is not so much health related as it is environmental (ie: cows and CO2) is it not?

    Depends on the person, I suppose

    Not to mention the ethical considerations and the religious ones

     

    I've got issues with inhumane treatment of some animals at some facilities. As a result, I tend to get my meats from reputable suppliers that I know are respectful of their livestock (or from friends who hunt and kill humanely). They are raised for food, but there is no need to be cruel to them until then. I know that my choice means my meat is more expensive, but I prefer less meat of better quality to more factory-produced crap. That's my view, which I will impose on nobody. I know exactly where meat comes from, and enjoy cooking and eating it.

     

    We have close friends who are observant jewish (keep Kosher) and others who are vegetarian (meat is "icky") and who don't want to eat from something that touched meat. So, silver lining, I have a dedicated grill for vegetables, which respects both the kosher friends and the vegetarian ones, and which is still useful to me when preparing sides at a different temperature range.

     

  15. Glad to hear it went well! My folks just got their first jab of the Phizer - second jab June 28. Its such a relief to me that they are safer than they were before

     

    Hopefully, my turn will end up ahead of schedule (September-ish) as we now have a lot of doses arriving 

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