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jark87

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Posts posted by jark87

  1. I tried recalling an old salmon recipe and think I got pretty close. If not, this one turned out great! Seasoned up the skin-on salmon, seared it on both sides in a healthy (or unhealthy, depending on your perspective) portion of butter. Once the salmon was cooked, I removed it and added honey, paprika and celery salt to the remaining butter to make a glaze. The skillet was too hot and burned some of the honey, but I salvaged enough for a good glaze. Tasted great!
     

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  2. I’ve thought about doing the same thing with my Smoke, just so I’ll be able to keep track of cooking temp when away from the grill area. I guess I’ve gotten spoiled by my KJ, as once I get the temp stabilized, it rarely moves more than 10°. I usually don’t even bother with the grate probe any longer, unless I have a 10+ hour cook.

  3. Looks like a nice pizza oven. I’ve heard positive comments on the Ooni oven. I don’t cook enough pizza to have a cooker dedicated to that specific task, but I do have a pizza oven that sits on top of my Kettle and it works great. Same basic concept, except the fire sits a little below the pizza stone in mine vs at the same level in a dedication pizza oven. The key seems to be ensuring that the heat is trapped near the top of the pizza so that the toppings cook as quickly as the dough.

     

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  4. Interestingly, I’ve yet to get a bad bag of JD, and I order it from Amazon, so I imagine it sees the worst handling possible (although it arrives in a box.) I get the version that comes in the plastic bag. I don’t see how that could help, but so far, so good.

  5. I’m about halfway through a bag of KJ big block. It’s pretty good, especially for the price when on sale. I’ve been using mostly JD, but it’s SO expensive. Tried a bag of RO and it was a total failure. Felt like I needed a mask due to the dust every time I opened the bag.

  6. 6 hours ago, John Setzler said:

    this site is going to shut down in short order anyway

    Boo! Very sorry to hear that, John. I only found this site a year ago, shortly after getting my KJ. There’s no way I’d be enjoying it so much had I not found the gurus! Regardless of what you do with the site, know that you’ve helped me and many others, I’m sure.

  7. Well done @A.O.! My Kettle has a half-circle ring on 1 side than holds the lid pretty well. Even though I don’t use mine very often any longer, I just can’t see myself ever getting rid of it. I’ve had some great cooks and some horrible cooks on that thing. My best brisket ever was cooked on the Kettle with the SnS and the cook that prompted my KJ purchase was a horribly dry Thanksgiving turkey that was quickly transformed into turkey salad. Of course, I took credit for the brisket and blamed the Kettle for the turkey.

  8. 6 hours ago, Jack. said:

    They were delicious; I think better than any fish entre I've had in expensive seafood restaurants.

    Looks fantastic and probably tasted even better! I, too, have become less and less enamored with restaurants. Yes, I enjoy being served, and especially avoiding cleanup duty, but the food never seems to be on par with what we can do on our own at a fraction of the cost. I’d rather spend the money on high-quality, fresh food, prepare it exactly how we like it, and embrace the entire process.

     

    Keep the seafood cooks coming!

  9. All of these steak posts got my mouth watering. Local grocer had prime filets “on sale” for $25/lb, so we had some friends over on a gorgeous 75° day. Did the typical 250° cook on the KJ with the SloRoller until internal hit 125°, while slow sipping a tasty Tito’s martini with jalapeño-stuffed olives. (Everyday is Friday for us retirees!) Not the healthiest dinner we’ve served, as our sides were mashed Yukon potatoes and mac and cheese. But it sure tasted good!
     

    After about 45 minutes on the KJ

     

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    Quick sear

     

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    Hard to tell from the lighting, but cooked perfectly!
     

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  10. Cooked fajitas for a group over the weekend, so I didn’t get the chance to take very many pictures. Marinaded the chicken breasts in a lime and Worcestershire sauce mixture. Grilled up bell peppers, onions and jalapeños, along with the chicken - all on the gasser for convenience. Wife also carmelized some onions to the point they were almost a paste, which made a great, sweet spread for the tortillas. Banana pudding and fresh mango sorbet for dessert. Great meal!
     

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  11. That’ll do it! I know some people that actually probe the steaks during the rest period and won’t move them to the sear stage until the internal temp starts to drop, which means that carryover cooking has completed stopped. I don’t get quite that technical with it, but I do make sure the steaks have rested for at least 10 minutes before searing. Usually enough time to make a margarita or martini and also allows steaks to be served hot off the grill with some sizzle action goin on!

  12. This is a very easy recipe, with only about 15 minutes of effort, but it takes some time due to the brining process, which is overnight. It’s worth it because the result is superb!

     

    1 lb salmon filet (skin on or off)


    Brine mixture:

     

    1/2 cup dark brown sugar

    1/4 cup kosher salt

    1 tsp black pepper

     

    Mix brine ingredients thoroughly. Place a layer of brine mixture in bottom of a shallow glass dish and place salmon on top of the brine. Pat remaining brine mixture on top and sides of the salmon flesh, covering as much as possible. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing wrap as tightly as you can around the salmon. Put the lid on the dish, or cover with another layer of plastic wrap to seal it airtight. Place in refrigerator overnight, 8-12 hours.

     

    After brining, rinse off salmon under cold water, removing any remaining brine. Place salmon on a wire rack on a tray or small sheet pan and place in refrigerator for 2 hours. Surface of salmon will become tacky, allowing smoke to adhere.

     

    Glaze:

     

    1/4 cup Bourbon maple syrup (or regular maple syrup)

    1 tbsp hot honey

     

    Stir glaze together and coat the salmon. Smoke at 225° until internal temperature is 135°-140°, around 40-60 minutes, depending on thickness. You can add more glaze during the smoke, but if you’re using a SloRoller, it will make a mess on the top, so wrap it foil or use a drip pan, something I forgot to do.

     

    Serve as is, on a bed of cream cheese with crackers as an appetizer, or on a salad. Enjoy!

     

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