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Boater

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Everything posted by Boater

  1. Just another observation here, different subs there can have different attitudes. My perception is that the Green Egg sub is ruder than the KJ is. And some of the other subs (like vegetablegardening) are pretty helpful as well. Just don't go on to the general Reddit page - not for me, at least.
  2. Reddit already has subs for Green Egg, Kamado Joe, charcoal, grilling, etc. And there's a different vibe to some of those subs, but for me, at least, they seem to have more activity from folks that are relatively new to the subject, but who are pretty positive that they have THE answer. The other obvious difference to me is the speed with which topics come and go. Here, we seem to get fewer responses, but on average more helpful ones. A lot of the credit for that has to go to folk like @John Setzler (and several others) who have a level of experience and study well above the norm. I'll miss the diversity of topics (recipes, gear, and especially the random pictures thread) and the courtesy that make this more a community rather than just a place to get a question answered. That said, if this site disappeared and was resurrected on Reddit, you'd find me there (under a different pseudonym).
  3. @John Setzler, a week or so ago, you mentioned that you replaced the motor on the Joetisserie with a heavier duty motor. Do you have a recommendation for that upgrade? Thanks
  4. This morning, I'm able to access the site on a mobile device for the first time in a while. No obvious / severe slowdowns, either. Must be magic
  5. When I was looking at controllers, I'd considered the Smobot. I got put off by the price of it (about $150 more than the controller I ended up with) more than anything. I like the simplicity of it - and that it's working "with" the grill itself, not adding a fan to do the job of creating air flow, which the grill itself is very capable of. Had that price been more competitive with the Auber controller, I'd probably have gone that direction.
  6. Yeah, ribs are trickier than most. I've found that if I'm careful about putting the probe in the thickest part of the rib, and half-way between two of the ribs, and away from any other bones, I sometimes get OK results. Sometimes I'll have to insert it more than once, when I see the meat temp going up faster than I think it should. But you can also just go by time and flex. I'm only concerned about the meat temp for ribs if I'm going to be away from the grill for an extended amount of time (I'm still traumatized from the gasser I used that required constant monitoring).
  7. On a laptop, at least I can get through. Mobile is not even doing that (Android, DuckDuckGo browser). Laptop it is...
  8. Hey, @T_om, I didn't see any attachments on your post. I'll go a bit of a different angle on it - ribs can get done in a range of temps from about 200 to about 350F, with some major adjustments in time and method. I've not figured out my "best" method, but would be interested in trying more, including yours, if you include the details
  9. I've done several different cooks with this controller now, mostly slow, but also chicken. So thought a summary of my experience might be in order. This was my first controller, so not familiar with a lot. A bit of a learning curve, but not bad. A lot of the issues I listed below were part of that learning curve. They're included here to hopefully shorten someone else's learning curve. The pit probe is the plug furthest away from the plugs for the power and fan, and is not labelled. With 3 probes, not hard to figure out, but labels (in contrasting color, not just as raised plastic) would be nice. App installed without issue, firmware updated without issue, following the directions in the manual. The basic manual for the 3615 is available on the website, but there is a troubleshooting manual and other materials for the prior generation (2615) that are not posted for the newer model at this time. The Auber information says you can save up to 6 cooking profiles, with up to 6.steps per profile. Well, not so on this version of the controller. That may be true with some of the non-kamado versions of the controller, but not mine. It has one profile, with up to 6 steps. You can also set it up in the app to just run at a fixed set of parameters (single step) and then adjust the temp if you need to. I use the steps to let me know when the meat hits an intermediate target temp, so I can know to check it, wrap it, or just for information if my phone is in my pocket. One cook, I didn't get push notification that step 2 started. Had Auber app open on phone, and note appeared on app. But wasn't looking at phone, and the screen was off. Expected notice that didn't happen. Otherwise, that has worked as expected. It does take a minute or so for the app to update with fresh info, especially if you're looking at the plot of temps. There is a "refresh" icon, which is handy. This post is already too long, so I won't get into the app, other than to say that there are a lot of controls available you may not need, and sometimes the one you're looking for isn't where you might expect it. But it is simple enough, once you've done it a few times. The unit is PID-controlled, and does a good job of maintaining temp, if everything else is working right. I've had a few instances where that was not the case, but those were not the fault of the unit, but the setup. I tried doing a chicken at 375, using a KJ electric starter to get the fire going. Set the deflectors and set up the controller. Fire never got to temp. Finally pulled the meat and stirred the coals, and found the temp climbed after that. The last couple cooks, the fan didn't run for quite a while, and temps were not quite where they should be. The issue was the setting of the fan in the lower vent. If it's not set in well, there's enough leakage that you won't be able to hold temps at 250F or below. A little care in setting the fan in place (and some tape if needed) can cure that. @Omogogo has provided some information on the earlier model running on an Akorn grill. Their primary issue was that the temp would overshoot the target, then the fan would shut off. The grill would take so long to get back to temp that they would lose the fire. I had similar issues with the newer model, though I never lost the fire. But in at least one cook, the fire didn't spread and heat very well. In another cook, it overshot the set temp (set at 350, went above 400 for a few minutes). Back to set temp in half hour (with some opening of some to set up food). I'm ok with some initial overshoot, as you'll need to open the grill to put food on, and after that your grill will be pretty close to the temp target. Once there, it holds it very well (if you've been careful about setting the fan to avoid leaks). Earlier had issue with maintaining connection to wifi. Turns out, you can't lay the unit on a metal table and get a wifi signal. Once I stood it up a bit, that issue went away. Customer Service via email has been very responsive, my only experience. Each probe can be individually adjusted for offset, if they're off temperature. That's a single offset per probe, but that should be adequate. The data is not curated on line. Rather, it's held in the unit, and sent to your phone when you request it from the app menu. That means that if you want to save the data, you need to do it at the end of the cook. Also, only the last 10 hours of the cook is retained, so if you're doing a 14 hour cook, you'll need to download that in two batches - one sometime before the 10-hour mark and another one when you pull the meat. It makes for one more thing to do when everything else is going on. Once the unit is unplugged, the data goes away. Data is saved as a .csv file, so easy to import into a spreadsheet and graph if you wish. You can also do screenshots of the app for documentation, if you want. There are no markup features on the app, so if you want to make notes on your cook, a separate means is needed (AFAIK), or they could be added later to the downloaded .csv file. I use a separate small spreadsheet (a practice I started before getting the controller). Useful, if you're trying something different, and want to remember details. The downloaded data file is a 10-column .csv file, with a header line and 101 lines of data. The first 5 columns are for the last 2 hours of the cook, in 1-minute intervals. The second set of columns is for the last 10 hours of the cook, at 6 minute intervals. Overall , I'm very satisfied with the product, but the real proof will be in the longevity of the unit and probes. It was a fair bit less expensive than other units on the market (got mine for $210, just saw they're on sale for a bit less now). That's the controller, fan, 1 pit probe, 2 meat probes. For that, I can do without all the bells and whistles.
  10. I've done several different cooks with this controller now, mostly slow, but also chicken. So thought a summary of my experience might be in order. This was my first controller, so not familiar with a lot. A bit of a learning curve, but not bad. A lot of the issues I listed below were part of that learning curve. They're included here to hopefully shorten someone else's learning curve. The pit probe is the plug furthest away from the plugs for the power and fan, and is not labelled. With 3 probes, not hard to figure out, but labels (in contrasting color, not just as raised plastic) would be nice. App installed without issue, firmware updated without issue, following the directions in the manual. The basic manual for the 3615 is available on the website, but there is a troubleshooting manual and other materials for the prior generation (2615) that are not posted for the newer model at this time. The Auber information says you can save up to 6 cooking profiles, with up to 6.steps per profile. Well, not so on this version of the controller. That may be true with some of the non-kamado versions of the controller, but not mine. It has one profile, with up to 6 steps. You can also set it up in the app to just run at a fixed set of parameters (single step) and then adjust the temp if you need to. I use the steps to let me know when the meat hits an intermediate target temp, so I can know to check it, wrap it, or just for information if my phone is in my pocket. One cook, I didn't get push notification that step 2 started. Had Auber app open on phone, and note appeared on app. But wasn't looking at phone, and the screen was off. Expected notice that didn't happen. Otherwise, that has worked as expected. It does take a minute or so for the app to update with fresh info, especially if you're looking at the plot of temps. There is a "refresh" icon, which is handy. This post is already too long, so I won't get into the app, other than to say that there are a lot of controls available you may not need, and sometimes the one you're looking for isn't where you might expect it. But it is simple enough, once you've done it a few times. The unit is PID-controlled, and does a good job of maintaining temp, if everything else is working right. I've had a few instances where that was not the case, but those were not the fault of the unit, but the setup. I tried doing a chicken at 375, using a KJ electric starter to get the fire going. Set the deflectors and set up the controller. Fire never got to temp. Finally pulled the meat and stirred the coals, and found the temp climbed after that. The last couple cooks, the fan didn't run for quite a while, and temps were not quite where they should be. The issue was the setting of the fan in the lower vent. If it's not set in well, there's enough leakage that you won't be able to hold temps at 250F or below. A little care in setting the fan in place (and some tape if needed) can cure that. @Omogogo has provided some information on the earlier model running on an Akorn grill. Their primary issue was that the temp would overshoot the target, then the fan would shut off. The grill would take so long to get back to temp that they would lose the fire. I had similar issues with the newer model, though I never lost the fire. But in at least one cook, the fire didn't spread and heat very well. In another cook, it overshot the set temp (set at 350, went above 400 for a few minutes). Back to set temp in half hour (with some opening of some to set up food). I'm ok with some initial overshoot, as you'll need to open the grill to put food on, and after that your grill will be pretty close to the temp target. Once there, it holds it very well (if you've been careful about setting the fan to avoid leaks). Earlier had issue with maintaining connection to wifi. Turns out, you can't lay the unit on a metal table and get a wifi signal. Once I stood it up a bit, that issue went away. Customer Service via email has been very responsive, my only experience. Each probe can be individually adjusted for offset, if they're off temperature. That's a single offset per probe, but that should be adequate. The data is not curated on line. Rather, it's held in the unit, and sent to your phone when you request it from the app menu. That means that if you want to save the data, you need to do it at the end of the cook. Also, only the last 10 hours of the cook is retained, so if you're doing a 14 hour cook, you'll need to download that in two batches - one sometime before the 10-hour mark and another one when you pull the meat. It makes for one more thing to do when everything else is going on. Once the unit is unplugged, the data goes away. Data is saved as a .csv file, so easy to import into a spreadsheet and graph if you wish. You can also do screenshots of the app for documentation, if you want. There are no markup features on the app, so if you want to make notes on your cook, a separate means is needed (AFAIK), or they could be added later to the downloaded .csv file. I use a separate small spreadsheet (a practice I started before getting the controller). Useful, if you're trying something different, and want to remember details. The downloaded data file is a 10-column .csv file, with a header line and 101 lines of data. The first 5 columns are for the last 2 hours of the cook, in 1-minute intervals. The second set of columns is for the last 10 hours of the cook, at 6 minute intervals. Overall , I'm very satisfied with the product, but the real proof will be in the longevity of the unit and probes. It was a fair bit less expensive than other units on the market (got mine for $210, just saw they're on sale for a bit less now). That's the controller, fan, 1 pit probe, 2 meat probes. For that, I can do without all the bells and whistles.
  11. I've done several different cooks with this controller now, mostly slow, but also chicken. So thought a summary of my experience might be in order. This was my first controller, so not familiar with a lot. A bit of a learning curve, but not bad. A lot of the issues I listed below were part of that learning curve. They're included here to hopefully shorten someone else's learning curve. The pit probe is the plug furthest away from the plugs for the power and fan, and is not labelled. With 3 probes, not hard to figure out, but labels (in contrasting color, not just as raised plastic) would be nice. App installed without issue, firmware updated without issue, following the directions in the manual. The basic manual for the 3615 is available on the website, but there is a troubleshooting manual and other materials for the prior generation (2615) that are not posted for the newer model at this time. The Auber information says you can save up to 6 cooking profiles, with up to 6.steps per profile. Well, not so on this version of the controller. That may be true with some of the non-kamado versions of the controller, but not mine. It has one profile, with up to 6 steps. You can also set it up in the app to just run at a fixed set of parameters (single step) and then adjust the temp if you need to. I use the steps to let me know when the meat hits an intermediate target temp, so I can know to check it, wrap it, or just for information if my phone is in my pocket. One cook, I didn't get push notification that step 2 started. Had Auber app open on phone, and note appeared on app. But wasn't looking at phone, and the screen was off. Expected notice that didn't happen. Otherwise, that has worked as expected. It does take a minute or so for the app to update with fresh info, especially if you're looking at the plot of temps. There is a "refresh" icon, which is handy. This post is already too long, so I won't get into the app, other than to say that there are a lot of controls available you may not need, and sometimes the one you're looking for isn't where you might expect it. But it is simple enough, once you've done it a few times. The unit is PID-controlled, and does a good job of maintaining temp, if everything else is working right. I've had a few instances where that was not the case, but those were not the fault of the unit, but the setup. I tried doing a chicken at 375, using a KJ electric starter to get the fire going. Set the deflectors and set up the controller. Fire never got to temp. Finally pulled the meat and stirred the coals, and found the temp climbed after that. The last couple cooks, the fan didn't run for quite a while, and temps were not quite where they should be. The issue was the setting of the fan in the lower vent. If it's not set in well, there's enough leakage that you won't be able to hold temps at 250F or below. A little care in setting the fan in place (and some tape if needed) can cure that. @Omogogo has provided some information on the earlier model running on an Akorn grill. Their primary issue was that the temp would overshoot the target, then the fan would shut off. The grill would take so long to get back to temp that they would lose the fire. I had similar issues with the newer model, though I never lost the fire. But in at least one cook, the fire didn't spread and heat very well. In another cook, it overshot the set temp (set at 350, went above 400 for a few minutes). Back to set temp in half hour (with some opening of some to set up food). I'm ok with some initial overshoot, as you'll need to open the grill to put food on, and after that your grill will be pretty close to the temp target. Once there, it holds it very well (if you've been careful about setting the fan to avoid leaks). Earlier had issue with maintaining connection to wifi. Turns out, you can't lay the unit on a metal table and get a wifi signal. Once I stood it up a bit, that issue went away. Customer Service via email has been very responsive, my only experience. Each probe can be individually adjusted for offset, if they're off temperature. That's a single offset per probe, but that should be adequate. The data is not curated on line. Rather, it's held in the unit, and sent to your phone when you request it from the app menu. That means that if you want to save the data, you need to do it at the end of the cook. Also, only the last 10 hours of the cook is retained, so if you're doing a 14 hour cook, you'll need to download that in two batches - one sometime before the 10-hour mark and another one when you pull the meat. It makes for one more thing to do when everything else is going on. Once the unit is unplugged, the data goes away. Data is saved as a .csv file, so easy to import into a spreadsheet and graph if you wish. You can also do screenshots of the app for documentation, if you want. There are no markup features on the app, so if you want to make notes on your cook, a separate means is needed (AFAIK), or they could be added later to the downloaded .csv file. I use a separate small spreadsheet (a practice I started before getting the controller). Useful, if you're trying something different, and want to remember details. The downloaded data file is a 10-column .csv file, with a header line and 101 lines of data. The first 5 columns are for the last 2 hours of the cook, in 1-minute intervals. The second set of columns is for the last 10 hours of the cook, at 6 minute intervals. Overall , I'm very satisfied with the product, but the real proof will be in the longevity of the unit and probes. It was a fair bit less expensive than other units on the market (got mine for $210, just saw they're on sale for a bit less now). That's the controller, fan, 1 pit probe, 2 meat probes. For that, I can do without all the bells and whistles.
  12. My local Ace also carries B&B lump, and once I registered with them, I get regular coupons for discounts (usually $5) on purchases over $35. 2 bags of B&B fits that description, so it gives me another option for picking up my lump (along with Academy Sports).
  13. Thanks, @MikeRobinson, but I'm really not after sear. I just want a bit of brown rather than grey on the surface. Also, my burgers have a pretty uneven surface, so hard sear surfaces don't work that well on partially cooked burgers - most of the meat is not making contact with the iron. Working them right over an open flame does put a more even color to them. And I'm not mashing juices out.of the cooked burger. But for smash burgers, that CI skillet or griddle is absolutely great, and I have a Lodge griddle that sits nicely on the Joe. It keeps the smoke and aromas outside, so diners get less saturated with those smells before mealtime. (Other than those who are out supervising or encouraging the cook).
  14. Yep, as I was cooking these, I was thinking that the next batch would be started off indirect, smoky, and slow, then finished hot and direct. Kind of irrelevant of the thickness of the burger for me, as I'm not trying to maximize the crust and those flavors, but focusing on getting smoke flavor. The learning curve continues.
  15. One of my first memories of barbecue hamburgers, perhaps like some other, is from an old fashioned church barbeque. The church elders lit the fire about 2 a.m., and the meat went on when it was ready. As many as 3 or 4 different meats, with split chicken halves usually being the best seller. But one of the options was a thin hamburger cooked slow, along with the rest of the meat. Needless to say, the Maillard reaction was not a big thing there, and they were pretty dry (though that was hidden by a baste of a local BBQ sauce). The primary flavor, though, was smoke. These days, a lot of the recipes I see for hamburger are cooked at higher temperatures, and my experience with those recipes that i've tried is that they are good, but they really don't say "Cooked with smoke" like those old burgers did. So today, I was thinking about those BBQs and got an itch for one of those burgers (or at least something similar). Lit the Kamado about 2 hours before lunch, and added 4 chunks of live oak. Let it go about an hour to get all stable, running about 300F. Used some grass-fed beef, fairly lean, but not sure what % fat. Salt, pepper, garlic powder, made the patties when I lit the fire, and let them rest. Made 1/3 lb burgers, fairly wide, maybe half-inch thick. Once the patties had been cooking about 20 minutes, started bumping temps up a bit, and ended up pulling them at about 35 minutes, just above 350 on the dome. A bit of color on them, which was why the heat was raised, but definitely not well-developed. Was really satisfied with the smoke flavor of the burgers, which is what I wanted. They went on some store-baked rolls with fresh lettuce and tomato. Didn't do the classic version, which only had the (mustard and onion based) barbeque sauce on the bread. But the smoke flavor was just what I was looking for. Just posting as a reminder - in this day of Kamado grills, wireless thermometers, digital barbeque controllers, pre-packaged dry rubs, cast iron and soapstone cooking surfaces etc., don't lose sight of the basic barbeque that got most of us interested in this method of cooking in the first place. It's still good, and worth a visit.
  16. Yeah, too much sage and rosemary for me - but I've cut down those, and dropped the sugar, increased the garlic, and find that more to our taste. But I find that to be the case with a lot of spices - our palates are not quite where a lot of others are. One reason I stick with a few homemade rubs. We'll get some commercial ones as gifts, and use them, but haven't repurchased any (yet).
  17. @kappclark, if you hadn't run across it, @John Setzler's list of videos is a great way to start your search for a recipe. He's got more out there as well, but there's a ton of info in those.
  18. So shiny! Looks good. Yeah, it was comments like that, on this site and elsewhere, that convinced me to get one when I ordered my grill. So the original bottom plate is still unused. Got the KJ version, rather than KAB, but that one is built solid as well. Along with the multi-part firebox and updated body materials for high-heat cooks, IMO, the greatest developments from the classic kamados
  19. Yeah, jackpot, right? Enough ideas there to go a long ways. And room for more, if you have some good ones to share.
  20. Check out the recipe forums on this site. My problem is that I can't leave well enough alone, and make more changes than I should. Sometimes that works....
  21. So many great recipes are like that. A splash of milk, a scoop of butter, "some" salt and pepper.... And if you ask for measurements, you're breaking the flow of the process, that makes the cook uncomfortable at best, and you can get "the eye". Best of luck!
  22. Welcome, @Maarssen. Looks like a solid base! How's the kamado sitting in there - got some concrete slab or similar under it? Will be interested in the build-out.
  23. I guess I'd be in the N-X category. Not currently trying to find out the value of X, but aware such a thing does exist. And aware that my knowledge of its existence modifies it. And that's as metaphysical as I'm getting
  24. Funny how that happens. They're amazingly simple and effective, and produce great food. I ended up accumulating a few (depending on definition of "few") more accessories than I "need" to do more with it. That's likely.a "newbie" thing, as I know folk who haven't done more than maintenance for decades. Welcome!
  25. So just for some perspective, here's the band on my newer Classic 1. The bands do have what seems to be the same felt material as the gaskets for the dome and base, all in this pic. Hard to judge just based on your pic, but it seems that there would not be enough additional material to make up the width you need. (The black speckling on the bands and bolt are from brushing carbon buildup from the dome, not corrosion etc.) And to answer some of.your other questions - KJ has a much smaller and a much larger model, but nothing with just that little difference as what you asked about. Could not figure out what you were trying.to show in the last pic. Good luck on the project.
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