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DerHusker

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  1. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from philpom in Cold Smoked Cheese   
    I been wanting to do this for a long time but didn’t have a proper equipment or the correct weather conditions. I recently bought an A-MAZE-N smoking tube.

    It was expected to get down to 41 degrees (fairly cool nights for Southern California) and it was only 67 during the day so I decided to give this a try. Around 4:00 PM I started by cooling the kamado down by placing 5 pieces of Blue Ice in it.

    Around 8:30 it reached 50 degrees outside, so I started up the A-MAZE-N smoking tube in my gasser so as not to heat up the kamado.

    Once it ignited, I let it burn for a few minutes

    before blowing out the flame.

    I let it smoke while I went in and prepared the cheese. I had purchased 2 lbs. of Gouda, Colby Jack and Sharp Cheddar at Costco.

    I took them out of their wrappers.

    I cut them up into smaller sizes so they could absorb more smoke and placed them on a wire rack.

    I then placed the A-MAZE-N smoking tube in the bottom of my kamado. I next put in both of my ceramic heat deflectors, then the grill grates and then the rack of cheese. (You can see some of the smoke coming up around the deflectors)

    I closed the lid and observed a small amount of smoke coming out the top vent.

    An hour later it looked like this.

    After two hours in the smoke I opened the lid. WOW!

    I brought the rack in the house where I could see a subtle change in the cheese color.

    I vacuum packed them all and placed them in the fridge to age and mellow for 3 weeks.

    This morning I when out to see how much of the pellets were left in the A-MAZE-N smoking tube. It looks like approximately 1/3 was left unburnt. I’m thinking it could’ve gone at least another hour.

    I can’t wait to try them but will wait to let time do its thing on them first.
     
    Thanks for looking.
  2. Like
    DerHusker reacted to psych in Tacos al pastor   
    I'm a little over a year and a half late to this post, but I found it a few days ago after deciding to try some different things on the Joe besides my typical fare. We were missing this meal after a local place we used to eat at closed down (presumably due to COVID) and I hadn't realized it was something I could do at home. We followed the instructions pretty much to the letter aside from doing it on the Joetisserie. All in all it was phenomenal and well worth the effort.
     
    I would definitely try to find a boneless pork shoulder since my butchering skills leave something to be desired. I also need to work on getting more char. After I trimmed off the first layer I never seemed to get more and as it was mostly already cooked I was afraid of leaving it on for too much longer in case it dried out. I could probably toss it in a pan afterwards and do a quick fry for a few minutes?

    Either way, excellent meal that certainly impressed my wife and our guest with not nearly as much work as expected. Half the time was just spent trying to butcher that damn shoulder.
     
    I just found a Gyro recipe here also, so moving onto that this weekend! Thanks to all those that continue to share their recipes.
  3. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from Alekto in Tacos al pastor   
    I love Tacos al pastor but have never made them myself. They are a popular street food here in SoCal and Mexico and I finally decided to try my hand at making some. Forgive me as this is a long one.


    I started out by thawing a Pork Butt I had in the freezer that I had purchased on sale for $.99 a lb. (7.93 lbs.)



    I unwrapped it and found there was still some ice crystals on it. (which is what I was hoping for to make cutting it easier)



    I cut it in half and deboned the other half.



    I proceeded to cut it all up into approximately 3/8” slices.



    I placed this into a large container, covered it and placed it into the fridge. I now gathered up the ingredients for the al pastor marinade.



    Here’s the recipe I used. (It’s a combination of several recipes I watched on YouTube) Not shown in the picture are the pineapple juice and the vinegar.

    8 lb bone-in pork shoulder (deboned)

    4 tablespoons achiote paste (I used 1 – 3.5 oz. brick)

    2 guajillo peppers (seeded and re-hydrated)

    2 ancho peppers (seeded and re-hydrated)

    3 Chipotle peppers + all the adobo sauce from 1 - 7 oz. can

    5 garlic cloves

    ¼ small white or yellow onion

    1 oz. Piloncillo (substitute brown sugar if you can find it)

    1 tbsp. dried oregano (preferably Mexican)

    1 tbsp. cumin                                                                            

    1 tbsp. salt

    1 tbsp. pepper

    1 tsp. cinnamon (preferably Mexican)

    1 tsp, cloves

    ½ cup pineapple juice

    ½ cup white vinegar

    ¼ cup OO

    ¼ cup of the water from re-hydrating the peppers

    ¼ cup orange juice

    ¼ cup lime juice

    1 pineapple, skinned and sliced into 1-inch (2 cm) rounds (for the spit/trompo)

    (Note: I only had some small guajillo chiles so I used 6 of them)


     
    Everybody went into the pool for a spin.



    I poured some marinade into the bottom of a very large bowl and then some pork slices.



    I repeated this process until all the pork was in the bowl and pour the rest of the marinade over the top. I then stirred it until everything had a nice coating.



    Now how will I cook this? Tacos al pastor is a dish developed in central Mexico that is based on shawarma spit grilled meat brought by Lebanese immigrants. It is traditionally cooked on a vertical spit known as a trompo. I don’t have such an exotic grill, so I had to improvise. I had found this indoor grill plate at a local thrift store for $2.17



    and used it to create a vertical spit.



    I now peeled and sliced up the pineapple



    And started my vertical trompo stack adding a slice of pineapple and red onion after every 6 or 7 layers of meat.




     



     


    I place the stack in the center of my weber redhead with coals all around it.



    I then setup my craving station.



    Here it is after approximately 30 minutes.



    After approximately 75 minutes I removed the trompo and craved off the outer charred layer. (The char is an important part of the taste profile)



    I then placed the trompo back in the redhead to char the outside again.



    So pretty!



    I then repeated the process another 3 times.




     


    After I had trimmed off the outside 3 times I set up my taco cart errrr bar



    and started to assemble my street taco plate.



    Oh Yum!



    Here it is served up with a Modelo Especial.




     


    This was a little on the spicy side but oh so delicious!         



    Thanks for looking.

  4. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from dh14ster in A very Tri Tip kind of Day!   
    It’s been a while since I last cooked anything let alone posted a cook. Sorry for that but life is just very busy and hectic for us these days.  It’s also been a while since I’ve had Tri Tip and it recently went on sale, so I picked up this 3.79 lb. behemoth.

    I took it out of the package and trimmed it up a little.

    I them minced some fresh Rosemary from my garden.

    I rubbed it down with some Worcestershire sauce, then some fresh ground salt, some fresh ground black pepper, some steak seasoning and finally the minced Rosemary.

    I wrapped this up in plastic wrap and let it rest in the fridge for 6 hours. I then made up some Tzatziki with I also let rest in the fridge for 6 hours.

    Around 4:00 I started prepping the Redhead for the cook. I started by spreading a layer of red oak chunks in the bottom of the Vortex ring.

    Around 5:00 I lit up a chimney of lump and poured it over the oak chunks. I place the Tri Tip off to the side and let it slowly come up to an I.T. of 113 degrees.

    I then took it off and loosely tented it with foil. I then opened up the vents and let the Vortex go nuclear!  (Here a pic without the flash so you can see it)

    I then placed the Tri Tip on the CI grate for 3 minutes per side.

     

    I then brought this in and let it rest for 10 minutes before slicing.

    While that was happening I sliced up some veggies.

    I then sliced the Tri Tip in half along the seam where the grain chances direction.

    I then thinly sliced each half across the grain.

    OH YUM!
     

    I had purchased some nice Pita bread so I made a Tri Tip Pita sandwich.

    Delicious!
  5. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from daninpd in Can anyone guess what this is?   
    Wow! Didn't think it would come out so quickly. This is the front view of a 1952-54 Kom-Pak camper with the 12' boat on top and is one of the latest projects my brother is restoring.
     
    Good job Ben!
     
    Here are some more pics.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    This is going to look awesome being towed behind the 56 Nomad he is also restoring.
  6. Like
    DerHusker reacted to adm in Soup: Hanoi Beef Pho   
    Today I made northern Vietnamese style beef Phõ (is that the right accent? No, but the closest my keyboard allows). The Northern style is typically simpler and more savoury than the Southern which tends to have a sweeter broth.
     
    Anyway. This was quite challenging to do on a Kamado.
     
    First, you need to get a load of bones for the broth. I used some beef marrow bones and knuckle, shoulder and an oxtail. Plus a pig's foot which is also common in the North to add some richness and gelatin to the broth.
     
    First off, soak the bones overnight in cold water. Drain in the morning, refill the water and bring to a rolling boil for a few minutes. Then empty the pan, clean it, rinse the bones - this gets rid of a lot of the impurities and scum that would otherwise make the broth cloudy. I couldn't think of a way to do this easily on the Kamado as my cooking area isn't set up for lots of water and rinsing. So I cheated and did it on the kitchen cook top. 
     

     

     
     
    Once you have done that, get some big shallots (or yellow onions) and ginger and char them up for 10-15 minutes on the Kamado. Then let them cool and remove the skins. Crush the ginger a bit. I used a 4lb lump hammer as it happened to be to hand.
     

     
    Now refill your pot(s) with fresh water and bring to a rolling boil. Then reduce the heat to a low simmer. Add your aromatics (the roasted shallots & ginger, Chinese black cardamoms (seeds only - unless you like the stronger camphor notes from the pod), star anise, coriander seed, fennel seed, some dried shrimp, some palm sugar, and a couple of heavy duty cinnamon sticks. I also added about a lb of boneless brisket. And some Vietnamese fish sauce.
     

     
    Let this simmer on the K for a couple of hours, then remove the boneless beef, cover with water for 10 minutes and then leave to cool.
     

     
    Keep simmering the broth for 3 or 4 more hours. Then you need to strain it all through a muslin/cheesecloth to clarify it. Leave the classified broth to simmer and adjust seasoning to your preference.
     
    Simmering is really hard on a Kamado. Boiling is easy, but simmering occurs at around 92 - 98C (sub 212F) and that's kind of tricky - or at least it was for me. At one point, my fire almost went out and I had to pull the pans of broth and cooking grid off the Kamado and mess with the coal. I got it dialled in eventually though.
     
    That's all you can do on the Kamado. The next bit is the assembly and condiments.
     
    I got some sirloin steak which I sliced thinly while raw. I also sliced up the brisket from the broth. Then I softened some rice stick noodles in hot water. Into the bowls went the noodles, the cooked and raw beef, some bean sprouts and some red onion. Then the broth went over the top to cook the raw beef and soften the beans sprouts.
     

     
    Condiments typically include Hoi-sin sauce, chilli sauce, fresh mint, coriander and any other herbs you fancy. Also sliced birds eye chillies, spring onions, more fish sauce etc, to taste.
     

     

     

     
     
    Anyway. It was good. I've got lots more broth left which I will freeze once it has cooled.
     
     
  7. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from KismetKamado in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    Well thanks KK. It's not quite as good as regular chili but it's a darn good alternative for me at the moment. It's a filling and satisfying meal that's still good for us. It's also really good on a baked potato.
  8. Like
    DerHusker reacted to TKOBBQ in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    I'm with KK, I don't know how I missed this post.  That does look downright tasty, Thanks for sharing.  
  9. Like
    DerHusker reacted to CheeseMcGee in Tuscan Sun-Dried Tomato and Roasted Garlic Bread   
    Once the pandemic started, it was clear lockdown was incoming, I grabbed a 25 pound bag of wheat berries just in case.  Now I'm trying to find every way I can to use it.  So once I saw that this months challenge was bread, I got pretty excited to try something new.
     
    The family really loves Sun Dried tomatoes, so I had to figure out how to get them in some bread.  I have a great sourdough starter, but the recipe I used can use regular yeast, all sourdough starter, or a mix of both.  I opted to use both. 
     
    The nice part about this bread is you can mix your dough ingredients, and let it sit on the counter overnight.  The next morning, you throw it in the fridge for 3-4 days and it's ready to go.  
     

     
    After the dough had rested for the night, I threw it into the fridge for a day.  Then I took it back out and let it come up to room temperature.  While waiting on the dough, I threw a bulb of garlic into some foil with a bit of oil and salt to get it nicely roasted.
     

     
    Once the dough was ready, I gently rolled it out about an inch thick. and put in the fillings:  Sun Dried Tomatoes, Basil, Roasted Garlic and Gruyere cheese. 
     

     

     
    After a gentle roll and tuck,it was back into the fridge to chill out for a few more days.
     

     
    Unfortunately, I got busy and forgot to take some of the pics of the baking process, but I'm sure you know how it goes.  I got the smoker up to a solid 450 with my large dutch oven inside to be ripping hot for the dough, meanwhile the dough was resting on the counter to come up to room temp.
     

     
    I dropped the rested dough ball into the dutch oven, and let it bake for about 20 minutes with the lid on, then I pulled the lid, and let it bake for another 10 minutes or so until it was golden brown and ready to go.
     

     
    While the bread was resting, I threw the rest of the tomatoes, basil, garlic, sausage and spinach into a pot and made a creamy soup that matched the bread perfectly!!
     

     
    This was a great bread, and although I didn't get a perfect spring in the dough and get all of those huge beautiful holes in the bread, it still came out amazing.  The taste of the bread was awesome.  Every few bites you would get a chunk of roasted garlic which was awesome, and the nice chewy tomatoes gave a nice texture.  On the next go round, I'll probably add more garlic and cheese, but this one was still great.
     
     
     
     
  10. Like
    DerHusker reacted to Golf Griller in Meat Stuffed Bread   
    I had seen this bread before the challenge was announced and I thought it looked good. Here is the ATK version of the bread: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2bxvkMltl0
     
    The deli was out of prosciutto when I was getting the meats, so I substituted panchetta.
     
    Here are the meats and cheese

     
     
    I had to brown the panchetta

     

     
    I found a white sandwich bread recipe online that I had the ingredients for:

     
    The bread ingredients were combined and kneaded in the Kitchen Aid mixer

     
    After raising and doubling in size here is the result

     
    The dough was stretched out into a rectangle and the meat and cheese were added and the dough was rolled up into a loaf and into a loaf pan.


     
    And then onto the grill.

     
    Time to come off the grill.

     
    After cooling and taken out of the loaf pan.

     
    And the finished and sliced product


     
  11. Like
    DerHusker reacted to bel4_20 in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    Looks amazing! off to the freezer i go looking for my smoked brisket i'm so making this tonight.
  12. Like
    DerHusker reacted to dman in FRIDAY!!   
    Came out great! Decided to go bareback. Kinda like a personal pan meatloaf!
     

     

  13. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from TKOBBQ in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    I picked up 2 lb. of 98% fat free ground turkey breast the other day.  I made some more of the 4 bean Turkey Chili I made a month ago with it but this time it was virtually free of points. (Only 1 WW Purple point)
     
    I diced up all the onions and peppers, mixed up the spices. Here are most of the ingredients.

     

     
    1 ½ Tablespoons Olive Oil
    2 lb. Pounds 98/7 Lean Ground Turkey
    ½ Yellow Onion (Diced)
    ½ Red Onion (Diced)
    I Poblano Pepper (Diced)
    1 Red Bell Pepper (Diced)
    1 ½ Teaspoons Minced Garlic
    1 6 Oz. Can Diced Green Chiles
    1 15 Oz. Can Corn
    1 15 Oz. Can Crushed Tomatoes
    1 15 Oz. Can Tomato Sauce
    1 15 Oz. Can Chili Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Black Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Dark Red Kidney Beans
    1 15 Oz. Cannellini Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Chicken Broth
    2 Tbsp. Chili Power
    1 Tsp. Cumin
    ½ Tsp. Crushed Red Pepper
    ½ Tsp. Chipotle Pepper Power
    ½ Tsp. Black Pepper
    ½ Tsp. White Pepper
    ½ Tsp. Salt
    ¼ Tsp. Cinnamon
     
    While I was prepping everything our new dog Lady came in to visit.

    I got out my enameled Dutch oven and placed the OO. I put it on the side burner of my Gasser.

    I put the Turkey in once it was heated up.

    I cooked it until just slightly brown.

    Next, I added the Poblano pepper, onions, Bell pepper and garlic. I covered this and cook it for 10 minutes stirring occasionally.

    Once the veggies had softened,

    I added in the spices and rest of the ingredients.

     

     

     

    and mixed everything together.

    I brought this to a boil and then covered. I turned the burner to low and let the chili simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Here it is after cooking.

    Here it is in a bowl, garnished with onion, cilantro, some lime and some Non-Fat Greek yogurt.

    This was delicious and only 1 point per serving. (A serving = 1 cup. This was a large bowl, so it was a double serving so 2 points) Eating like this makes me forget I'm losing weight.
     
    Thanks for looking.
  14. Like
    DerHusker reacted to daninpd in Cracklin Bread   
    It's a Southern thing, leaving off the "G" is just a given.  So, this is a Emeril Lagasse bread that he claims is best suited to serve with his "Country Pate" and he's right.  The bread is made with pork cracklings mixed in with the dough (early, in the yeast and water), and with a high protein flour (I used Caputo Americana) it comes out like a country French bread, slightly dense and chewy.  Served with his "Country Pate" it was a great opener to a epic lunch.  You see other recipes for Crackling Bread that are varieations on cornbread.  This one is worth doing.  https://www.emerils.com/122881/crackling-bread 
    And look up Emeril's "Country Pate" online.  It's really a terrine, but it is oh so good with that bread, pictures included for free.









  15. Like
    DerHusker reacted to KismetKamado in Jalapeño Cheddar Bread   
    I am not much of a baker, but bread making is something I have tried to get into.  My sourdough starter is still alive, though I don’t use it often and have blatantly neglected it for months at a time on several occasions over the years . My attempts at using only my starter have not been great, so I didn’t want to rely on that for my challenge cook.  I decided on an easy no knead type recipe for jalapeño cheddar bread that included commercial yeast. 
     
    Ingredients pictured... minus one key player - the salt. I thought to myself no one cares about salt in the picture... But in hindsight, I should have grabbed the salt at this moment while I was thinking about it.  (Cue the ominous foreshadowing and impending doom music.)
     


    I actually used twice as much jalapeño as the recipe called for.... and they were pretty big. If I do it again, I’ll probably go at least 6. 
     
    Shredded the cheese and chopped all but one jalapeño (which got sliced) and mixed that in with the bread flour.  Then tossed this all together. 
     

     
    Meanwhile, I added the warm water and yeast to another bowl. I added in a bit of my starter as well for good measure. 
     

     
    Then added my flour, cheese and jalapeño mixture to that and incorporated all the ingredients together.  Well... almost al the ingredients. 
     

     
    Let it rise for about an hour and a half. 
     

     
    Then plopped it out onto a floured surface and did a few stretch and folds and shaped into a round. Brushed that with a bit of olive oil and put a couple of slashes on it and then topped with some reserved cheese and sliced jalapeño.  It was at this moment,  as I was admiring my handy-work, that I realized I forgot the salt. Dang it!  Too late now.  Oh well. 
     

     
    Now before all that, I fired up the KK this morning and let it slowly come up to temp and heat soak. Once my dough was resting, I put in a diffuser and my Dutch oven and worked on bringing it up to 450-ish. 
     

     
    This enameled Dutch oven has a couple of chips in the enamel on the inside, so it is on permanent bread duty only. 
     

     
    Lowered my shaped and topped loaf into the screaming hot Dutch Oven using parchment paper. 
     

     
    Let it ride half an hour with the lid on and then pulled the lid. 
     

     
    Then let it ride another 20 minutes or so. 
     

     
    Set it on the upper grate of my Kk on a table to cool.  Super easy to lift out with the parchment paper. 
     

     
    Brought it in to rest a bit more. 
     

     
    And then cut into it way too soon... it was still steamy inside. Patience is not my strong suit. 
     

     
    I think the only saving grace for the missing salt was the cheese in the bread. It was ok... but would have been great with the salt. 
     
    Easy enough to do and came together within a few hours. I’ll try it again with more jalapeños... and the salt!
     
     
  16. Like
    DerHusker reacted to KismetKamado in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    Can’t believe I missed this post!  That looks fantastic. I’m a big turkey chili fan and yours looks perfect, @DerHusker.
  17. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from daninpd in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    I picked up 2 lb. of 98% fat free ground turkey breast the other day.  I made some more of the 4 bean Turkey Chili I made a month ago with it but this time it was virtually free of points. (Only 1 WW Purple point)
     
    I diced up all the onions and peppers, mixed up the spices. Here are most of the ingredients.

     

     
    1 ½ Tablespoons Olive Oil
    2 lb. Pounds 98/7 Lean Ground Turkey
    ½ Yellow Onion (Diced)
    ½ Red Onion (Diced)
    I Poblano Pepper (Diced)
    1 Red Bell Pepper (Diced)
    1 ½ Teaspoons Minced Garlic
    1 6 Oz. Can Diced Green Chiles
    1 15 Oz. Can Corn
    1 15 Oz. Can Crushed Tomatoes
    1 15 Oz. Can Tomato Sauce
    1 15 Oz. Can Chili Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Black Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Dark Red Kidney Beans
    1 15 Oz. Cannellini Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Chicken Broth
    2 Tbsp. Chili Power
    1 Tsp. Cumin
    ½ Tsp. Crushed Red Pepper
    ½ Tsp. Chipotle Pepper Power
    ½ Tsp. Black Pepper
    ½ Tsp. White Pepper
    ½ Tsp. Salt
    ¼ Tsp. Cinnamon
     
    While I was prepping everything our new dog Lady came in to visit.

    I got out my enameled Dutch oven and placed the OO. I put it on the side burner of my Gasser.

    I put the Turkey in once it was heated up.

    I cooked it until just slightly brown.

    Next, I added the Poblano pepper, onions, Bell pepper and garlic. I covered this and cook it for 10 minutes stirring occasionally.

    Once the veggies had softened,

    I added in the spices and rest of the ingredients.

     

     

     

    and mixed everything together.

    I brought this to a boil and then covered. I turned the burner to low and let the chili simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Here it is after cooking.

    Here it is in a bowl, garnished with onion, cilantro, some lime and some Non-Fat Greek yogurt.

    This was delicious and only 1 point per serving. (A serving = 1 cup. This was a large bowl, so it was a double serving so 2 points) Eating like this makes me forget I'm losing weight.
     
    Thanks for looking.
  18. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from KismetKamado in Repeat 4 bean Turkey Chili   
    I picked up 2 lb. of 98% fat free ground turkey breast the other day.  I made some more of the 4 bean Turkey Chili I made a month ago with it but this time it was virtually free of points. (Only 1 WW Purple point)
     
    I diced up all the onions and peppers, mixed up the spices. Here are most of the ingredients.

     

     
    1 ½ Tablespoons Olive Oil
    2 lb. Pounds 98/7 Lean Ground Turkey
    ½ Yellow Onion (Diced)
    ½ Red Onion (Diced)
    I Poblano Pepper (Diced)
    1 Red Bell Pepper (Diced)
    1 ½ Teaspoons Minced Garlic
    1 6 Oz. Can Diced Green Chiles
    1 15 Oz. Can Corn
    1 15 Oz. Can Crushed Tomatoes
    1 15 Oz. Can Tomato Sauce
    1 15 Oz. Can Chili Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Black Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Dark Red Kidney Beans
    1 15 Oz. Cannellini Beans
    1 15 Oz. Can Chicken Broth
    2 Tbsp. Chili Power
    1 Tsp. Cumin
    ½ Tsp. Crushed Red Pepper
    ½ Tsp. Chipotle Pepper Power
    ½ Tsp. Black Pepper
    ½ Tsp. White Pepper
    ½ Tsp. Salt
    ¼ Tsp. Cinnamon
     
    While I was prepping everything our new dog Lady came in to visit.

    I got out my enameled Dutch oven and placed the OO. I put it on the side burner of my Gasser.

    I put the Turkey in once it was heated up.

    I cooked it until just slightly brown.

    Next, I added the Poblano pepper, onions, Bell pepper and garlic. I covered this and cook it for 10 minutes stirring occasionally.

    Once the veggies had softened,

    I added in the spices and rest of the ingredients.

     

     

     

    and mixed everything together.

    I brought this to a boil and then covered. I turned the burner to low and let the chili simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Here it is after cooking.

    Here it is in a bowl, garnished with onion, cilantro, some lime and some Non-Fat Greek yogurt.

    This was delicious and only 1 point per serving. (A serving = 1 cup. This was a large bowl, so it was a double serving so 2 points) Eating like this makes me forget I'm losing weight.
     
    Thanks for looking.
  19. Like
    DerHusker reacted to SmallBBQr in 8” Mercer Chef Knife and My Knife Roll   
  20. Like
    DerHusker reacted to philpom in Camp Quesadillas and rice - BioLite   
    I think I posted about the BioLite a long time ago, we are camping at the lake this weekend and decided to use it as our primary cooker.   It burns almost anything, pine cones, bark, twigs, nut shells and even dried cow manure.  For the record I use twigs and bark for boiling water but when cooking food directly over it I use wood chunks like hickory, no cow patty.
     
    This cooker obviously qualifies as cooking over fire.  It is extremely unique in the idea that it burns wood gas for a very efficient burn.  It uses fan forced air to get extremely hot and burn clean.  For camping it offers endless fuel.  
     
    When I bought it I charged the battery.  I haven't charged it again because it charges itself while it burns.  It even has a USB port for lights or phone charging. 
     

     

     

     


     
    Home sweet home
     

     
    Visitors 
     

     
    I also whipped up some chorizo/egg tacos for brunch.  Served with guacamole,  sour cream and hot peppers.
     

     
    We'll see what's next for the weekend. 
     
     
  21. Like
    DerHusker reacted to John Setzler in Trying out my Enso SG2 Bunka knife by making Pico de Gallo   
    That looks awesome   Have you ever tried adding just a pinch of freshly ground cumin to that?
  22. Like
    DerHusker reacted to len440 in Trying out my Enso SG2 Bunka knife by making Pico de Gallo   
    Cumin the magic Mexican spice if you can find it try Mexican oregano
  23. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from JeffieBoy in 8” Mercer Chef Knife and My Knife Roll   
    Wow adm! Those are nice knives. A far cry from the cheapy Mercer I just purchased for the occasional use on a vacation or at a bbq gathering.
  24. Like
    DerHusker got a reaction from JeffieBoy in 8” Mercer Chef Knife and My Knife Roll   
    Thanks Jeffie. I'm assuming these cottages are far from a local super market so the kitchen box sounds to a great idea. As you stated " having only 30 year old, burnt, thin frying pans and butter knives disguised as  “chef knives"." gets old and this knife and roll is my response. The pans at this last one were usable but the skillets were straight out of the 70's. Old Teflon pans where the Teflon was mostly going or gone already. We weren't going to use them under any circumstance. Luckily we were visiting family up there so we borrowed one of their skillets to cook with.
     
    These Airbnb's should look there supplies and ask themselves weather they would want to cook on/with them. Again they don't need to be expensive but something usable would be nice.
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