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keeperovdeflame

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Everything posted by keeperovdeflame

  1. That is similar to what I do, in poor man's fashion. I don't have a sous vide but I put slices of prime rib into plastic baggies and heat them in a pan of water on the stove top. I the idea is to put a few slices in each bag so they heat trough quickly. I dip my fingers and sprinkle water droplets inside the baggies. I also heat au jus in a separate pan and drizzle that over my cut slices when I put them on a plater or plate them. I have never tried to heat a whole prime rib, my thought would be that the outside would over heat as you keep it in the sous vide for an extended period of time trying to heat the meat deep in the roast. The slice before heating seems much easier. I serve my PR sliced anyway.
  2. Glad you enjoyed your trout. I have been using that method for probably 30 years. We go fishing in Utah pretty much every year, and usually get some very nice rainbow and cutthroat trout. I love to make trout like that in the morning and then add some scrambled eggs for breakfast. A couple cups of great coffee off the camp stove and the morning chill, good times to be sure.
  3. Yeah, the dough is pretty sticky but really seems to make a nice pie. I use 00 flour for bench flour and with a slight dusting the dough is pretty workable. One thing that amazes me is that no matter how thin I roll out the dough a cooked piece does not bend or droop but stays flat when you pick it up. I also like the taste and chew. The edge is crisp with a really nice texture. He says you can use between 625 and 688 grams of bread flour with 480 grams of water. I was using the Ken Forkish 24 to 48 hour dough, but actually like this better. The recipe for his dough on line was from him and in cups, I converted it to grams so I could be more consistent. I pulled these pies a little soon, when I cooked them longer I got really nice color and char.
  4. I reduced the amount of flour to 625 grams and like my results.
  5. We actually get snow here in the mountains of Arizona. One thing I learned the hard way is that if you plan to remove a hot deflector during a cook, make an insulated spot to set it and don't just haphazardly put it onto of a stone table covered with snow. Only deflector, I can honestly say I ever broke over all the years I have been cooking.
  6. When they first came out years and years ago, I bought a Gen 1 KAB, the one with the thin steel wire. It eventually rusted and warped but still worked just fine and fit my Egg perfectly, Not because it was less effective but only because I wanted one, I eventually got a Gen II KAB with thicker steel wire, which I used for a really long time. Just last week the top wire bent a bit, which gave me an excuse to get a new, I am thinking, probably Gen III or more, stainless steel basket. Man, is that thing beautiful. Quality construction, heavy as heck, and will probably last as long or longer than I do. The guy that came up with these, baskets always did quality work, but the baskets he is putting out now are just things of beauty. Probably the single most useful accessory I have, and I use it every single cook I do. Can't recommend one of these enough. But by now probably every one here already knows that.
  7. Yeah, me too. I totally agree with Jack, I run HighQue Gold Standard Nomex on my large green egg and love them. The ones made to fit my Large BGE fit perfectly right out of the box with no adjustment. They have adhesive on the back of the gasket and are relatively easy to apply. I installed the gaskets I am running now on June 26, 2019 . I even did a post about how to install them. Here are a few pics. What they look like today after countless cooks
  8. At the beginning when I first started cooking pizza I used parchment paper and found it helpful. I used to make pies a head of time when we entertained guests and the ability to move made pies around really helped. Then I started experimenting with doughs and my technique changed. I started taking readings of my pizza stone with an infrared thermometer, and instead of putting pies on when my grill reached 500 on the dome thermometer, I learned to wait for my stone itself to get to 550- 600 degrees before putting on a pie. This technique really upped my Pizza cooks and my crusts IMO, came out much, much, better. However, parchment paper at those stone temps did not work so well for me, and I often had trouble separating the paper from my cooked pies. Hence I went from parchment paper to using flour on a wooden peal. However, when using flour on the peal I often picked up to much of a flour taste on my crusts. So, I went to using corn meal, which is like putting your uncooked pie on top of ball bearings as these little round kernels really allow your uncooked pies to slide well. However, you can't make pies ahead because if you leave a pie on the peal too long it will tend to stick and not load on to your pizza stone properly as it has a tendency to pull and loose it's shape. So now I use corn meal with a wooden peal to load pies and a metal peal to take them off once they are cooked. Higher stone temps was a key for me, and changed the way I cook pies. Hope this helps. I found pizza making is really a journey as you don't end up where you start off. Ps. I just made the coolest pie the other night. It was based on some of the dishes my wife and I had in Israel when we traveled there. My pie had chopped dates, sliced Italian green and kalmata olives, sliver sliced red onion, Mozzarella and goat cheese with shredded prosciutto and copocolo, with a drizzle of fig jam on the finished pie. Really good probably one of the best combinations I have tried. Happy cooking.
  9. If you are cooking a loin, know that they are similar to cooking a chicken breast in the fact they don't have much fat and as such are easily over cooked and dried out. I cook mine marinated in butter milk, and with moisture giving apples and sweet onions layered in between the two loins that are then tied together. I pull them at 125 internal and wrap them in foil to raise the IT to somewhere in the 130 range during a short rest. They come out white with a rose colored hue, and still quite moist. I use a roasted garlic blend rub on the outside over a slather of good olive oil. Prior to my cook I sauté some sweet onions and apples in olive oil and roasted garlic, to pre soften them and add them as a layered stuffing. if your cooking a actual pork roast, with a bone or a couple of bones, I would use the same rub cook indirect and pull it around 130 IT.
  10. There is an old saying which claims " even a rock wrapped in bacon is tasty" . Using that same logic and conventional wisdom "Anything placed on a pizza is delicious." I love your pulled pork pizza, it looks really tasty with jalapeños and BBQ sauce. Nothing betta for game night. Ps. I mix pulled pork with hatch green chilies and use it in scrambled eggs. I saw a special on Netflix the other night where a lady pizza chef's top pizza has kimchi on it. To me Pizza dough is a blank slate that can be painted with pretty much anything you can think of.
  11. For some reason, I seemed to have fallen off the pizza train. For years and years I made, at least, a pie a week. But with covid, supply chain issues, and the availability of great pizza in town, I drifted away from my practice. I got a spark of motivation when I watched The Netflix show Chef's Table featuring Chris Bianco, and researched his dough recipe. I made my first batch of his dough yesterday and threw a couple of our favorite pies on my Egg last evening. I really liked the flavor, texture, bite, and chew with the Bianco dough. Although, I went a little wild with dusting flour and got a bit of excess flour on the bottoms of my pies. Other that that, however, the pies were great and even though I can easily get great pizza in town, making pies at home again reminded me why I love making pies at home. Here's a few pics. Sautéed baby Bella mushrooms with garlic, green onion, and shredded prosciutto, with whole milk Mozzarella and goat cheese Naughty Margherita with pepperoni
  12. Chris Bianco's dough recipe 1 envelope Active Dry Yeast 2 cups water ( 105 to 110 dg) 5 to 5 1/2 cups bread or high protein flour 2 tsps fine sea salt converted to grams. 7 g active dry yeast 480g water 688g bread flour 9.8g fine sea salt Simple directions. Stir yeast into warm water let sit until dissolved 5 min Add 3 cups of flour stirring by hand gently until dough is smooth then add 2.5 cups more, when all the flour is in add salt continue stirring by hand until dough comes away from bowl, but is still sticky. knead and pull the dough in opposite directions 10 to 15 times to stretch it, then knead it until smooth about 10 minutes. Chris says It is done when it smiles. Shape the dough into 1 large ball and put in an oiled bowl cover with plastic wrap and let sit on the counter for 3 hours. Turn out on to floured surface cut into 4 equal balls dusting with flour during the process. put the dough balls in a proof box or cover them with plastic wrap from another hour or until they double in size. Now you ready to shape and top your pies. Bake between 550 and 600. If you want more sour dough taste extend the proof time to 7 to 24 hours. Pizza baked following the 3 + 1 hour original proof will brown more quickly than the longer proof times. Bianco says this is a basic recipe and he recommends using it and then mess around with it or just extend the proof times until you get it to match your personal taste.
  13. I used to get beef cheek tacos in a little place in the barrio where I worked, when I was still working. Amazing flavor, which I would imagine would fall into the same category as shanks. I know I love the heck out of lamb shanks and they have a much different flavor and texture than say leg of lamb. Great cook.
  14. Chris Bianco's dough recipe 1 envelope Active Dry Yeast 2 cups water ( 105 to 110 dg) 5 to 5 1/2 cups bread or high protein flour 2 tsps fine sea salt converted to grams. 7 g active dry yeast 480g water 688g bread flour 9.8g fine sea salt Simple directions. Stir yeast into warm water let sit until dissolved 5 min Add 3 cups of flour stirring by hand gently until dough it forms into one mass, then add 2.5 cups more, when all the flour is in add salt continue stirring by hand until dough comes away from bowl, but is still sticky. knead and pull the dough in opposite directions 10 to 15 times to stretch it, then continue to knead it until it's surface is smooth (about 10 minutes). Chris says It is done when it smiles. Shape the dough into 1 large ball and put in an oiled bowl cover with plastic wrap and let sit on the counter for 3 hours. Turn out on to floured surface cut into 4 equal parts dust with flour and form the parts into palls dusting with flour during the process. Put the dough balls in a proof box or cover them with plastic wrap for another hour or until they double in size. Now you ready to shape and top your pies. If you want more sour dough taste extend the proof time to 7 to 24 hours. bake at between 550 and 600. Pizza baked following the 3 + 1 hour original proof will brown more quickly than the longer proof times. Bianco says this is a basic recipe and he recommends using it and then mess with it or extend the proof times until you get it to match your personal taste.
  15. I am betting that your pie was delicious, sure looks great.
  16. Welcome ThAkorn, glad to have you and your Akorn with us.
  17. Welcome, glad to have you and your new Joe with us. Enjoy your new grill and the forum conversation as well.
  18. That is definitely cool, never seen one of those before. Makes for a really nice table presentation and family style serving.
  19. My thought is, it is Globals sharpener specifically made for Globals knives. I am not aware of another pull through that uses ceramic stones in a water bath. I have four Japanese water stones and a water sharpening station in a plastic tub, but using it and trying as I might, I can't get the quality of edge I do with the Global sharpener. My technique so far is sampling using the sharpener, and then stropping the blades on thick folded news paper. It seems to work very well, and I can't see any damage to the blades.
  20. Pretty cool project. After market Bands, Hinges, vents, and screens along with diffusers and internal cookingl grates and racks to hold them which are designed to fit a BGE are easily available on Amazon. Much of the after market stuff is designed very close to original BGE parts and some are, IMO, actually better quality With thicker stainless and such. I also like the AR rack and grate assembly from from a company called Ceramic Grill Store out of Denton Texas, and it is what I cook on. JB weld is what most people use to fix cracks during restoration. Another thing to think about is that you will be the original owner for any parts or ceramics you actually purchase from BGE , which means that those specific parts will be covered by the BGE warranty. If you need some more specific information just PM me. Glad to help.
  21. I cook on a BGE and not a KJ, but those marks look to be very small imperfections in the finish of your fire box panels, and do not appear to be cracks or anything serrious . Personally I wouldn't worry about those at all. I can't think of a single piece of ceramic gear I have that has an absolutely perfect finish. Think of those marks like a brush stroke on the finish, they are not deep or actual damage. My advice is don't worry about them and just cook like crazy. Besides, your ceramic gear is under KJ's warranty so if something should actually break, they will replace it.
  22. Definitely not as healthy as using the breast, but I am having a hard time cutting back on thighs and drum sticks. The mushroom blend with crisped up proscuttio really added a savory tang.
  23. A couple three weeks ago, JackJumper did a cook he called "layered chicken breasts". I took his idea and did a follow up cook using his method but with chicken thighs, for dinner this evening. I used a blend of shiitake and baby bella mushrooms with prosciutto, along with sun dried tomatoes and sautéed mashed garlic and onions. For cheese I used a blend of aged gouda, herbed goat cheese and a little grated parmesan. For seasoning I used a liberal amount of McCormicks roasted garlic and herb blend. For a side I made a tomato salad with chocolate tomatoes and good mozzarella. It came out great, and presented quite well. My wife loved it, and said we needed to add it to the dishes we do for company. Here's some pics.
  24. "Chef's Table - Pizza: Chris Bianco" is the hour long first episode of a new Netflix streaming series. I had no idea when I clicked on it, what it would be like, and it ended up being probably the very best single thing I have seen about food, cooking, and how it relates to life. I watched it with my wife, and believe it or not, we both had lumps in our throats and tears in our eyes. Truly an amazing widow into a man's art and his life. The big bonus is that I also learned quite a bit about cooking and pizza in general. I would be surprised if anyone who is into cooking would not have the same reaction as my wife and I did. Enjoy, IMO it is well worth the hour you will spend watching. Enjoy
  25. I use Royal Oak most of the time. But my favorite charcoal is Fogo and I buy a couple or three bags when ever I see it on the shelf at my local True Value. Expensive but I really like the way it burns and smoke aroma is very nice. I usually use it for big cooks like Thanksgiving Turkey, Christmas Prime Rib, and Easter Leg of lamb. I also like Jealous Devil and Big block KJ.
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