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5698k

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5698k last won the day on December 19 2017

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About 5698k

  • Birthday 04/14/1961

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  • Location:
    New Orleans
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    Komodo Kamado

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  1. I guess a better question, do you have any specific knives in mind?
  2. What about the white #1 do you like?
  3. Fat isn’t bark, it’s just fat, try fat down. You say you wrapped at 150°, that’s too early, if there was any bark, it hadn’t set yet. Wrap when it enters the stall, or roughly 165°. Did you probe it before you pulled? Brisket can be done anywhere between 190°-210°, so probe tender is key.
  4. The fact that you’re saying good red wine, I’m thinking Mr B’s, but regardless, it looks like traditional New Orleans style BBQ shrimp. Thanks!
  5. It will look dry as the bark forms, that’s a good thing. Fuel will only affect burn time, and flavor, but not general cook quality. Try one rind down, and ride it out. Cook to probe tender, not a specific internal temperature.
  6. Flip it over. The rind, or fat cap will protect the bottom from drying out. If you believe meathead, which I do in this case, the fat layer does nothing to help with moisture. Additionally, 195° may not be done yet, particularly if you’re thoroughly re heating the next day, it sounds like you’re finishing the cook.
  7. Like I said Ben, that’s not exactly what happened. You didn’t see the entire thread, but I have a screenshot of it.
  8. The other individual in the exchange did not take offense, nor did he make an over reactive remark in response.
  9. I didn’t take a stance, I said that what burgermeister said isn’t exactly what happened.
  10. That’s not exactly the way it happened.
  11. That’s a class I’d like to attend!
  12. 1. Looks good, but don’t go crazy, you can always add later. 2. Never over estimate simplicity. Salt and pepper are always good starts, particularly for beef. Pork typically adds brown sugar, garlic, and often chili powders to the mix. 3. You’re good, but keep it covered when not in use. 4. I like stainless, but there’s no need to be in a hurry. 5. You said low and slow. A chimney starter will start way too much coal for a lo/slo..you’ll learn to always start with a full load of coal, and I use Rutland cubes, put a single cube in the middle of your coals, close the lid, and allow your temp to come up slowly. Learning temp control is very important for beginners. 6. I don’t use a gasser, I can taste the gas. 7. The outside will get hot, so be aware of it.
  13. I’m thinking more like a drip wash tub...
  14. Yeah, the second large whole packer brisket.
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