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landscaper

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    Cumming Georgia

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  1. Me three. Looks perfect to me. Now I want pizza.
  2. Sounds great!. If you liked that then try this. It's good! https://thewoksoflife.com/italian-pork-sandwich-philly/
  3. I would put them on about 6 am and run at 275 to 300. When probe tender take off and wrap and put in a cooler. No problem. One more thing. I would put them in a foil pan inside the cooler.
  4. Nope! Ran mine all the time without a controller. The FB I have is just convenient.
  5. Vacuum seal and freeze. Reheat in microwave or sous vide or water bath in pot. Frozen for a year or more.
  6. I'm not sure but I would think they would use some type of acidifier.
  7. That's crazy. I'm sure you know this about garlic but I'll post it anyway for others who may not be aware. Foods that need to be blanched first: • Broccoli • Cauliflower • Cabbage • Brussels Sprouts • Turnips • Other cruciferous vegetables Unfortunately there are just a few foods that cannot be vacuum sealed. Some foods contain anaerobic bacteria, which can grow without the presence of air, meaning even within a vacuum sealed pouch these bacteria will continue to grow and may pose a risk to your health. Foods that cannot be vacuum sealed: • Mushrooms • Garlic • Soft cheeses • Brie • Camembert • Ricotta ... • Other soft and unpasteurized cheeses
  8. I bought a Vacmaster 215 a few months back. I love the dam thing. I use it a bunch. We have a foodsaver too but we hardly used it due to the expensive bags and the PIA factor. Although bags have come down in price as more competition has entered the market. I had one seal break on some chicken breast I froze. But that was probably user error. Correct seal time and making sure the bags are not wrinkled or wet when sealing is the key. Its a huge time saver and it saves freezer space as well. I think your going to love it John. Vacmaster is Chinese made too so I would guess that they share the same components. I saw the one you bought and thought about it. Price is good. I was just worried about support and parts. Which is why I went with the Vacmaster. Looking forward to your review.
  9. I too bought a VacMaster. Best decision I made. We have a foodsaver but hardly used it over the years due to it being so fussy and horrible on liquids. The Vacmaster is a breeze to use and does a fantastic job. I bought a SS table and put wheels on it and have the VacMaster setup on it. Sucker weighs 85 lbs. so you have to have a dedicated spot for it. But man is it worth it. Bags are cheap too. I use it several times a week. OP If you can swing a Vacmaster you won't regret it.
  10. Couple tips. Stretch the dough to the size you want...actually a little bigger as it will shrink a little...before putting it on the peel. Dust the peel with some flour before putting on the peel. Only leave the dough on the peel long enough to dress the pie. The longer it sits the more its going to stick as it transfers moisture to the peel. Lastly....pick up one end of the dough and blow under the dough. Give it a little shake and launch. Blowing under the dough is a tip that has helped me. Works like a charm. One more thing. In the beginning I was using too much flour mixed with Semolina flour.....problem is it burns and you can taste it in the final pie. Cut back on both flours and started to blow underneath before launch and the results are much better. One one more thing....rub the flour into the peel. You don't need much at all. I have a peel similar to this I got at RD. https://www.webstaurantstore.com/american-metalcraft-2414-15-1-2-x-13-7-8-wood-pizza-peel-with-8-handle/1242414.html
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