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Addertooth

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  1. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from RaymondL87 in Kamado K7 Restoration   
    I would say that anyone who services outside grills and fire pits should be able to hook you up with the right fitting.  And yes, I do drop into this thread from time to time.... I entirely applaud those who continue to add to this resource.  Although these types of Kamado grills tend to have the same kinds of problems (cracks, frozen dome spiders, falling off tiles, etc), it is almost reassuring to see someone come up with something new and different from time to time.  It makes this thread a better resource when something new is introduced.
  2. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Colin in Kamado K7 Restoration   
    I would say that anyone who services outside grills and fire pits should be able to hook you up with the right fitting.  And yes, I do drop into this thread from time to time.... I entirely applaud those who continue to add to this resource.  Although these types of Kamado grills tend to have the same kinds of problems (cracks, frozen dome spiders, falling off tiles, etc), it is almost reassuring to see someone come up with something new and different from time to time.  It makes this thread a better resource when something new is introduced.
  3. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Colin in Kamado K7 Restoration   
    HSacCo,
     
    I think you will like the Satinite 3000 coating.  It really reflects heat well and reduces the chance of thermal shock cracks from forming.  I probably would not have gone with the rutlands silicone for cracks, as accidental excursions over 500 are quite possible (especially how fast they climb in temperature once you hit the 150 degree "knee").  The rutlands silicone probably is not a bad choice for tiles, as it actually provides a greater amount of thermal insulation than most thinsets.  The cloth backing for the tiles is part of the problem (with the original tiles), as the backing starts to cook off at around 500.  The original thinset, which was not latex modified amplified the tile loss.  One of the virtues of the old K7s is the thick cross-section of the refractory cement, it lends itself well to patching fairly strongly.  If you have any pictures of yours before the damage, please post them.  You have one of the unusual colors of tiles which were only available for some of the final models.  BTW, you did a great job of re-tiling the top, the rows look beautiful.  May I suggest a charcoal grey grout?
    And also, take a read through this thread, and check out the fix for the sagging damper springs.  If not already, then some time soon the lid may not stay up without locking down the dogs on the damper springs. 
    Best of luck with your restore,
     
                      Addertooth
  4. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Weekend Griller in Bayou top vent   
    If the upper damper is cast iron, you can also use a strong magnet as a "door stop" do hold it in place.
  5. Thanks
    Addertooth got a reaction from dj714 in Another K7 in the forum   
    K_sqrd showed the actual factory rack.  I attached a photo which shows the original X-Rack for the diffuser as well.  I have the old wire basket insert which has the flat topped handles, which give an even lower location to rest the diffuser stone.  A new rack can be purchased from the company which makes the "rocket" in Las Vegas (Galaxyoutdoor.com).  I got my stone from Californiapizzastones.com
    It is made from a material more durable than a standard pizza stone.  It is chemically closer to a kiln stone in terms of it's composition. 
     

  6. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from freddyjbbq in Joe Jr use case   
    Why?





  7. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from mliebs in Joe Jr use case   
    Why?





  8. Thanks
    Addertooth got a reaction from marauders in Kamado K7 Restoration   
    I used the standard high temp tape which is used to seal the dome to body on most kamados. 
    It is known as:
    Lavalock® Nomex Gasket w/ Self adhesive
     
  9. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from inpowers in Problem keeping a "low and slow" temp   
    Addertooth's semi-scholarly overly-technical treatise follows:
    Everyone on this forum will agree that Oxygen intake rate drives temperature.  The more oxygen coming in, the higher the burn rate of the charcoal, thus more heat is released from the charcoal.
    Oxygen is a portion of the air coming into the Kamado, along with Nitrogen, Carbon Dioxide, etc.
    The airflow rate is driven by 5 principal factors:
    1. The position of the lower vent (size of gap)
    2. The position of the upper vent (size of gap)
    3, Size of charcoal chunks and quality of charcoal
    4. The speed of any wind that day, and relative position of the lower vent (is it straight towards the vent and thus acting as a scoop, At a right angle to the wind which is essentially neutral, or away from the wind, creating a partial vacuum)
    5. The total heat being released by the coals and temperature of the ceramic.
     
    Lets discuss 1, 2 and 3 first (mechanical blockage).  Airflow is principally dictated by vent positions.  Keep in mind it requires both vents to be at least partially open to get good through-and-through flow.  If you close either vent, you will never achieve pizza temperatures, even if the other vent is wide open.  Adjusting either vent (upper or lower) affects total airflow.  For most people, they use the upper vent for fine adjustments, and the lower vent for large adjustments. However, most (but not all) people cannot entirely snuff out the fire by closing only one vent.   Think of the vent position pictures posted as a "starting point", besides minor differences in Kamados, there are huge differences in charcoal (even within the same brand sometimes).  Small crumbly charcoal tends to block airflow, thus requiring larger vent openings to achieve the expected temperature.  Large chunks of high quality charcoal seems to require vents which are more closed to achieve a specific temperature.  These mechanical factors determine how much "resistance" air flow encounters while it tries to flow through your grill.
     
    Now onto item 4, wind speed and direction.  Every hot rod piston head knows the way to get more power out of an engine is a supercharger or turbocharger.  As you add more air, you can burn more fuel which creates more power.  The same holds true for your Kamado.  If your lower vent is facing the wind on a breezy day, it will act as a scoop.  The scoop action enhances air flow through the Kamado, which in turn increases the burn rate and the corresponding release of heat.  Facing the vent away from the prevailing breeze has the opposite effect.  If it is a really windy day, you may wish to have the vent at roughly 90 degrees to the wind, in order to cancel out any scooping or sucking effect. 
     
    And finally, item 5 which is the amount of total heat energy in your Kamado.  When air is heated, the molecules and atom start to vibrate, nudging each other further apart.  This makes hot air have fewer atoms per square foot, fewer atoms per square foot makes that air "lighter" than fresh cool air.  Because the hot air is lighter, it rises.  The hot air rising out of your upper vent creates the flow, which in turn causes fresh cold air to be sucked into the lower vent.  Remember, it is this fresh cool air which has the unconsumed Oxygen mixed in with it.  The hotter the Kamado is, the higher the flow rate of air is *for any vent position*.  This is part of the mechanism for temperature overshoot which some people experience.  The novice will get the charcoal going raging hot (they either leave the lid open too long, or light too many spots on the charcoal for a low and slow cook), then wonder why their temperature launches beyond their target temperature.  All that extra heat encourages a higher airflow (more oxygen), then they overcompensate by "over-closing" their vents, which as the heat declines, and convection (flow) rates drop, causes airflow to drop precariously low.  We end up with the poor newcomer chasing temperatures all over the place, with some of them snuffing the fire out entirely. 
     
    At Casa Addertooth I use a few very basic rules of thumb.
    1. Light the coals in one spot for every hundred degrees you are shooting for (round up)  So, 225 (rounded up) is 3 spots, 350 would be 4 spots.
    2. Light the charcoal first, perhaps an hour before it is needed, use the hour to go inside and prep the food.
    3. Light, Adjust vents to expected position, Add any deflectors you are going to use, then close the lid, let time be your ally. 
    4. Never ever sweat 25 degrees (unless you are doing something really technical like Crème Brule). Heck, many of the experienced cookers here don't sweat 50 degrees or more.
    5. Don't make yourself frantic or worried at any time over temperature, it WILL eventually bend to your will.  Give a good 20 minutes between any vent adjustment, make very small adjustments.
     
    Grilling and Smoking should be a relaxing experience, being in a hurry to get the fire going can be a major stressor, plan ahead, light early and make small adjustments. 
  10. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from jnc342 in Cast iron half moon   
    I love my griddle!


  11. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Panchango in Becoming Frustrated With Joe Jr....   
    When a ceramic part cracks, it indicates there was stress introduced when it was fired (ceramic typically shrinks when fired).  The key to a good patch on a crack is simply prepping the cracked faces, and then using whatever your patching agent is while the ceramic part is in a "relaxed state".  If you wire it tight as you are patching it, then the stress will remain and you will end up fixing the crack again.  
  12. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from dianlonyc2 in Cast iron half moon   
    I love my griddle!


  13. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from KismetKamado in Cast iron half moon   
    I love my griddle!


  14. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Dub in Two Racks of Ribs on the Joe Junior   
    I thought they would fit, so I tried it.  With a rib rack, you can fit two racks of ribs on the Joe Junior.
    1. The racks must be Saint Louis style, so you have dome and dome thermometer clearance.
    2. The racks must be cut into two unequal halves.  With the shorter half on the front/back or the rack, the longer half in the middle of the rack.  The best way is to measure 13 inches from one end, and cut there.
    3. Cook the ribs with your usual method.
    4. Enjoy.
     
     

  15. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Dub in Joe Jr owners.....what are you using for a cover?   
    Considering your father had knee surgery (and deep knee bends will be difficult), consider getting one of the stainless prep tables that are sold at places like Costco or Sams for about $120.  I found bending and crouching when using mini-sized grills, such as the primo Jr and the Kamado Jr problematic.  Once I put my two juniors on a table, so the handle height was the same as my larger Kamados, they were a lot easier to use. 
  16. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Astroguy57 in Beef ribs on the #KamadoJoe hot and fast   
    The rendering came out perfect. The texture was "show doneness", that is, slight tug, but not falling off the bone. When I have cooked these at 225, I got more of a smoke ring.
    The ones in the picture below were 225 for the entire cook, no foil, rub only:
     

  17. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Astroguy57 in Beef ribs on the #KamadoJoe hot and fast   
    Every now and then I get the urge to play with a tried and true recipe.  The victim today is classical slow smoked beef ribs.
    I have always stayed away from the hot-n-fast club, after all, low and slow is the classical way to smoke many favorite dishes.
    Today I had 3 hunks of beef ribs, and a short timeline to dinner; it was time to play fast and loose.
    The ribs were rubbed with #KamadoJoe steak rub, and Bone Sucking steak rub. 
    Next they were placed on the Big Joe which was cruising along at 250 degrees. 
    The smoking woods were put on extra heavy, as this cook was going to be fast.
    The woods were hickory (20%), pecan (20%) and apple (60%). 
    After 3 hours on the smoke, the ribs were foiled with a few tablespoons of beef stock.
    They were kept in the foil for about an hour, then the foil was removed.
    Lastly, the ribs were sauced and the KJ was raised to 350 degrees to set the sauce.
    30 minutes later the ribs were pulled, sliced and served.
     



  18. Like
    Addertooth reacted to coferj in Another K7 in the forum   
    Ok I don't have the same basket. My handles are shorter and more angled outward than that. 

  19. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from coferj in Another K7 in the forum   
    K_sqrd showed the actual factory rack.  I attached a photo which shows the original X-Rack for the diffuser as well.  I have the old wire basket insert which has the flat topped handles, which give an even lower location to rest the diffuser stone.  A new rack can be purchased from the company which makes the "rocket" in Las Vegas (Galaxyoutdoor.com).  I got my stone from Californiapizzastones.com
    It is made from a material more durable than a standard pizza stone.  It is chemically closer to a kiln stone in terms of it's composition. 
     

  20. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from sdv in Kamado K7 Restoration   
    Part-way through this, and it is time for a minor rant.  The original purchaser paid extra for stainless steel bands.  They now show (very) minor surface rust.  The majority of the nuts and bolts appear to be zink plated carbon steel.  I think most purchasers would normally expect if they pony up the extra cost for stainless bands, they would get stainless hardware to match.  For those who know the history of the company, they can only smile and nod at this point.
    As a sub note, I tried taking a torch to the seized upper damper threads; still no joy.  Tomorrow the 3/4-10 die is scheduled to arrive.  After cleaning up the threads, a lock nut and jam nut will be put on the upper damper threaded shaft.  Perhaps with some cautious wrench action, it can be freed.  I am a little scared to get too macho with it.  The spider is just tubular steel with steel rod (the rod is cast into the dome) supporting the "floating spider".  Too much force will bend the tubes, or crack the dome. 
  21. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from JoeC in Conspiracy Theory   
    hmmm, sounds like a cookbook may be in the outing.
     
  22. Like
    Addertooth reacted to ckreef in Another Diem Kamado!   
    Looking good. Can't wait to see you fire it up. Not sure I'd take it much over 400*. Wouldn't want to chance cracking it. 
  23. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from marauders in Another Diem Kamado!   
    Great find BigCaddy.  The finish on those old Diem grills was amazing.  One of the few glossy ceramic finishes which kept their looks without significant crazing.  One of these days I will trip over one of those old diems, and it will become mine.
  24. Like
    Addertooth reacted to Sharon in Kamado K7 Restoration   
    Hello all, I have had 2 Richard Johnson K's since 1999.  A K7and a K3, they were manufactured in Indonesia before the quality went to crap.  They are tiled with colbalt blue tiles.  We've never had any issues with either except baby k did seize up last winter when I closed her top hat (damper) down solidly.  Had to work on her for a couple weeks with lubricant to free her.  We  moved the baby K (k3) to our new home, but K7 is still at the old one.  She's moved twice, and I'm not sure given many people's experiences, she will enjoy a 3rd longer distance move.  In speaking with Dennis, at Komodo Kamado, he tells me I must have gotten a couple of the "dry ones", meaning that they were properly cured.  That being said, we elected to seriously upgrade our kamado experience and pulled the trigger on a KK 22" supreme Hi-top a couple of weeks ago.  I'll probably keep K3 for old times sake for small cooks, but will look to part ways with K7 and her accessories as she is similar in size.  Not all Richard Johnson K's are equal.  If you can find a decent one, it will give you some incredible cooks.  Just my 2 cents.
  25. Like
    Addertooth got a reaction from Lumpy_Coal in Big Joe Firebox Divider - Do you Use It?   
    John, you know my mind on this.  The firebox divider, combined with the horizontal diffusers, gives a significant effect.  Especially if you block the air holes in the charcoal grate on the non-charcoal side.  It makes a reverse sear a practical thing to do, without having to pause and re-configure the system mid-cook.  For people who have a single Kamado, it is a real bonus.
    In terms of raw numbers, I would wager there are several dividers which have never seen fire.
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