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biddi4

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Central Ohio
  • Grill
    Akorn

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  1. Bump for added pics. Also, I did a chuckeye roast the other day and the temps ranged from 216-236. I'm totally fine with that. So, I love this gadget. Plus, when the cook is done, I can just close the original top vent and the fire goes out like normal. I think the TTT by itself has trouble staying closed to snuff the fire because when the unit cools, it opens up again. Now, no worries.
  2. No, because of where everything lined up with the TTT on top of the vent. Where the holes are actually holds it pretty snug. If you added height to the TTT with say a coffee can inside, then maybe. But attempt at your own risk. The way I have it, it doesn't move at all. I'm very pleased
  3. See pics here http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/18820-tip-top-temp-aka-ttt/page-4
  4. This post will be better once I add pics, but I just used a clever method to attach a TTT to an Akorn. I took out the center screw of the top vent. Replaced it with an eye hook screw. 1/4" I think. A 1/4" bolt fits through the eye. Then, I drilled 2 hole on either side of the TTT 180 degrees apart. Slid a 6"x1/4" bolt through one side, slipped on the eye hook, then slid the bolt through the other side and put a nut on it. Prior to this, I filed the top of the eye hook just enough so that the flapper of the TTT didn't get obstructed. Then I put the threaded end of the eye hook through the center hole of the Akorn top vent and put on the 2 original washers and finally the eye hook nut. Tightened everything up and slid the silicon gasket provided with the TTT and made a nice seal. Now, I still have my original vent and have no worries about snuffing out a fire after a hot cook. Plus, if I want to go 500-600 or so, I can just slide out the 1/4" bolt and lift off the TTT and I'm back to original Akorn with a little eye hook on top of the vent. I'll take pics after dinner is cooked.
  5. This post will be better once I add pics, but I just used a clever method to attach a TTT to an Akorn. I took out the center screw of the top vent. Replaced it with an eye hook screw. 1/4" I think. A 1/4" bolt fits through the eye. Then, I drilled 2 hole on either side of the TTT 180 degrees apart. Slid a 6"x1/4" bolt through one side, slipped on the eye hook, then slid the bolt through the other side and put a nut on it. Prior to this, I filed the top of the eye hook just enough so that the flapper of the TTT didn't get obstructed. Then I put the threaded end of the eye hook through the center hole of the Akorn top vent and put on the 2 original washers and finally the eye hook nut. Tightened everything up and slid the silicon gasket provided with the TTT and made a nice seal. Now, I still have my original vent and have no worries about snuffing out a fire after a hot cook. Plus, if I want to go 500-600 or so, I can just slide out the 1/4" bolt and lift off the TTT and I'm back to original Akorn with a little eye hook on top of the vent. I'll take pics after dinner is cooked.
  6. About a month ago, she did the same thing. So I spg'd them, reversed seared them, and only half the steak was tender and moist. I was pretty disappointed. Meanwhile, after owning this rig for 6 months, I'm still learning things I thought I already knew. I figured out by accident that the only part of the meat probe that should be trusted is about an inch of the tip. I had been sticking the whole probe in to steaks, chops, and chicken breasts which resulted in the tip being closest to the outer edge. Since I figured this out, my cooks have improved greatly. So, today I made sure I got the grill up to 225, (with toe's tip about leaving the bottom vent open all the way and dialing in the temp ONLY with the top vent. It hit 225 and didn't move. Granted it was less than an hour, but trust me, it was the most stable my temps have been yet. So, anyway, brought the steaks up to 130, covered them, brought the grill up to 600 and put them back on for 1 1/2 minutes a side. Best cheap steaks EVER. I ate every bit of it. I only have the one pic cuz I was too busy eating. But trust me. Perfection.
  7. +1 on the DIFFUSER. I didn't see it used, or mentioned in the pics above. I notice that even when the fire is first lit that if my probe happens to be over some flame, it can read in the 200's. Once it settles down, it's back to like 100. So to experiment with low temp, gotta have the diffuser.
  8. Well since I started this post, I've settled in to a pretty consistent method. The majority of my cooked are 225-250 and all I do it start with a half full basket with a slight mound in the middle. Then I light a half a weber cube and cover it with at least one good sized lump. Then set my smoking chunk on or near that. Put my smoking stone in place, shut the lid and open both vents full. Then, When the temp gets towards 180, I shut the vents to their low and slow positions and some times the temps stop right there so I have to open them up some. Other times temp climbs slowly to my target. If I do a reverse sear, all I do is open the vents wide and I'm up past 500 in 15 minutes. This method got me 14 hours last weekend with plenty lump left over. My original reason for the post was just questioning why the ceramics have all the holes in their baskets for air flow, but our open bottom/grate design baskets must be sufficient because I have no trouble dialing my temps in. Took me a while, but I've got this down.....I think
  9. I don't know about leavin that red sticker up in the dome like that. I removed mine.
  10. No, the label said: "Boneless Chuckeye Roast" from Meijer's I cooked at 225, but the first 2 hours it fluctuated from 210-220. I was trying not to adjust too much and I didn't want it to spike. I wrapped it at 170 and pulled it at 198. Like I mentioned, it felt dry when I wrapped it, so I figured I dried it out, but I thought it turned out good. Maybe I should have wrapped it earlier. Next time I will. It's all about learning. You can follow a recipe or directions, but I think you gotta actually do it to learn what works for you.
  11. I don't think so, Here's the ingredients from Stubb's website: Sea Salt, Paprika, Spices, Garlic, Ground Turmeric, Natural Smoke Flavor But knows what other chemicals are in there lol
  12. Here it is. Wow!! When I wrapped it, I thought it was burnt and dried out, but when I unwrapped it, it was moist looking and smelled great. I pulled it. It seemed perfect, but to be honest I haven't ever pulled beef before. But it tasted awesome. Beefy, moist, smokey. Perfect. Just dipped it in some BBQ sauce and ate her down.
  13. STALL!!! Been at 147 for over an hour! WTF? It's not that friggin big lol
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