Jump to content

MD_Ag

Members Plus
  • Content Count

    108
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Everything posted by MD_Ag

  1. I wasn't kidding when I said I was looking forward to a Great British Bake-off / Kamado crossover. I've wanted to do a tarte tatin for a while, but it is an intimidating dish. Turns out I should have done this long ago. The natural sweetness of the apples combines with the buttery pastry and kamado smoke to create an excellent dessert. The Mrs. was very pleased. It all started with a from scratch puff pastry. A real one, not a rough puff. The dough is fairly simple, but the magic comes from the sandwiched layers of butter. I did two regular turns, then a book turn, then a final turn. Each process needed an hour in the fridge to cool. Now for the filling. A simple caramel was made from 235 g of sugar and half a cup of water. You're looking for a lighter brown color. Once done, pour directly into the skillet (pre-greased with 1 tbsp butter). Important note: no matter how good the caramel looks, do not try to get a swipe with your finger. You will get a bad blister immediately. The caramel will, however, taste delicious. The apples were honey crisp. I believe I used five (probably should have used at least one more). Used a quick corer, then cut the wedges in half. Arrange the bottom layer on top of the caramel in a nice pattern, since this is basically an upside down cake. Then pile the rest of the apples in. Roll out the dough to cover the entire skillet. Cut off the excess, but leave enough that you can tuck the edges down between the apples and the side. While the tart was cooking, I used the excess dough to make some quick cinnamon turnovers. Now assembled, put on the grill at 400-425°. Bake for about 40 minutes and check for doneness. I went for 45 overall. Allow the tart to cool, then the moment of truth: turning it out. Any extra juices should be poured back over the apples. While the grill was still hot, I cooked up some bacon wrapped sweet and sour shrimp. A slice of tarte tatin and a glass of port was a great end to this celebratory meal.
  2. Nice bake! Food Wishes is a great resource.
  3. MD_Ag

    Cast Iron Tarte Tatin

    Never disparage an apple crumble. I've gone to restaurants specifically because of its presence on the menu. Good to hear! The flip was much easier than I thought. The stainless pan was one inch bigger than the cast iron, so there was both room for error and convenience of handles lining up.
  4. MD_Ag

    Rotisserie Glazed Pineapple

    Looks nice. I'm a little surprised you went for direct heat. I usually get too many burnt sugars that way.
  5. MD_Ag

    Cast Iron Tarte Tatin

    Reverse that. Apples on the bottom of the pan, then pastry on top of them. The flip to apples on top only happens after the cook. Unless I'm misunderstanding you.
  6. MD_Ag

    How to cook a pork belly?

    If you mean remove the skin instead of fat, that's personal preference. You'll need a higher temp at the end to crisp up the skin at the end if you leave it on, or bring it to a frying pan for the effect. I like to remove it and make very juicy bite sized pieces, sort of like burnt ends.
  7. I was going to say deviled eggs, but this is nice too.
  8. MD_Ag

    Cooks Using Covered CI Pots

    When I've made pasta sauces or other items in a Dutch oven, I typically leave the lid off for the first hour or two to get more smoke flavor. Be ready to add more stock/water/wine as appropriate if drying out is a danger.
  9. I always use a drip pan for turkey, but it's for gravy purposes. Toss some veggies and stock in there to simmer with the juices from the bird.
  10. I've got a work luncheon coming up. We like to celebrate Thanksgiving without dealing with the same leftovers we're all about to have for a week. So instead of turkey, I'm going to smoke a ham. As this isn't a big event that has to be "perfect", I'm hoping to use it to try out something new. I'm looking for ideas for the glaze. Maybe it's your favorite. Maybe it's something you wanted to try but haven't had a chance (we'll be your Guinea pigs!). Maybe your in-laws have a killer recipe, not that you'd admit that to their face. Whatever it is, let's hear it. Many of us have done a classic orange/ honey/ brown sugar (and if not, hop to it), but what can we get when there's no tradition to worry about?
  11. That's the one I've done before. It works very nicely. I'm learning towards a sweet mustard sauce, as the ham will be taken into work cold and likely served as sandwiches.
  12. MD_Ag

    Drying Peppers

    This reminds me I have a bag of dried peppers that needs grinding. I followed gotzero's instructions from an earlier thread, then toss them into a convection oven to speed the full drying process.
  13. I've been interested in trying to put together more "kamado meals". It's easy to throw a brisket or pork shoulder on and figure some sides out during the twelve hours you have to wait. But what if it's a weekday evening and you need to start from scratch? And you want to include dessert? I started with a sweetened shortcrust pastry dough so it could sit in the fridge during the rest of the prep. Next, I cut a small (~3 lb) pork roast in half long ways, then sliced that into eight medallions. These were coated in a spicy southwest rub, then wrapped in bacon. Those went in the fridge to marinate. The small potatoes (got a mix of red, yellow, and purple) were cut into even smaller pieces. Not sure if they count as diced. These were tossed with a bit of rub and half a diced onion. To start the cook, four slices of bacon were placed on the cast iron I had already placed in the grill. After a few minutes to render, the potatoes were added and the pork medallions placed on top. I cooked them until the probe showed 150 internal, flipping once. While that was going on, I rolled out the pastry dough to make some rustic apple dumplings. "Rustic" here means too lazy to peel. While my wife and I ate the main course, the dumplings were on a 40 minute timer. Probably could have used an extra ten. They completely fell apart, but honestly, the taste of an apple dumpling is the most important part. Any combination of dough, apple, butter, and brown sugar will work. I started the prep around three, we ate the meal around 5:15 and had dessert around 6:15. Not too bad for timing, and some could be saved with night before prep. I was also pleased with the new Nomex felt keeping all the heat in. Thanks for reading!
  14. MD_Ag

    Beef back ribs

    Very jealous. Around here there is a $6/lb difference between a back rib and a rib-eye steak, so they're cut as close to the bone as possible to maximize profit. If I call my local butcher ahead of time, he'll sometimes leave a little more on there, but never that much.
  15. MD_Ag

    Beef back ribs

    Where the heck did you find a butcher who leaves that much money on the bones?!
  16. I will be showing this one to my wife. Switch out couscous for quinoa and it's got her food groups.
  17. MD_Ag

    Beef back ribs

    I like back ribs better than short ribs when straight smoking. More surface area for the rub means a more consistent taste. Short ribs are nice when you are braising or plan to do more to the meat. I will say there is a huge difference in the back ribs I get from the butcher shop versus what I see in a grocery store. Butcher or bust.
  18. MD_Ag

    Kamado Apple Pie

    Excellent job. The dessert sub forum is way underutilized, but still one of my favorite sections. More things like this, everyone!
  19. I didn't plan on joining this month's challenge. I've never cooked any seafood on the kamado, as I'm always paranoid about under cooking and getting someone sick, especially now that my wife is six months along. But she loves seafood and really wanted me to make a recipe she found, so here we go. Step one: Halve and peel peaches, then soak in lemon water. Step two: Make the corn and bacon relish. Cut the bacon small, cook until fairly crisp, then pour off most of the oil. Add in (frozen) corn until warmed, then add a splash of cider vinegar. Salt and pepper to taste, then keep warm until time to plate. Step three: Prepare the asparagus. Toss in olive oil, then add rub. Foil up and grill around 350°. Step four: Make the fish rub. In relative amounts, use one portion of cinnamon, two of cumin, and four of paprika. Salt and pepper to taste. Apply to the rub to the filets, then lightly rub with olive oil. Drizzle honey on top, then move the filets (on a cedar plank) to the grill. Cook until done (minute were twenty minutes). Step five: Once the fish is on the grill, also add the peach halves. Grill about ten minutes on each side. Plating: Top the salmon with some lemon butter (lemon zest with 4 tbsp melted butter). Drizzle honey over peaches. Final step: ENJOY! This actually turned out really well. I was suspicious of the cinnamon in the fish rub, but it came through very nicely. And though I know this already, I really need to grill fresh fruit more often. Such a nice way to end a meal. Thanks all for reading.
  20. MD_Ag

    Beef back ribs

    Your butcher was extremely kind. So jealous.
  21. Saw another German YouTube video that made me want to try something. Basically just a smoked meatloaf, but that doesn't mean it isn't tasty. 2 lbs "meatloaf mix" from the store (mix of beef, veal, and pork) 2 eggs Breadcrumbs (I was out, so I crushed a bunch of fancy crackers we had) Seasoning (mostly a Lawry Southwest mix) Brie cheese (half a small wheel, ~4 oz.) Bacon Blackberry sauce (BB jam, cider vinegar, butter, honey) Mix the meatloaf ingredients, then take about half to make a bottom layer. Slice the cheese and lay in the middle, topping with additional seasoning (some was already in the mix). Cover with the rest of the meatloaf, getting a good seal. Lay bacon across, then more seasoning. I put all this in an aluminum tray with holes poked for grease drainage. Had the grill somewhere around 300° (probe said 275, dome said 350). When the internal temp reached 130°, I slathered the top with the Blackberry sauce. Cook until 165. Very tasty, but I wish I had checked the fridge before going to the store. I thought I still had a pack of dried apricots that would have gone inside with the cheese. Guess I was subconsciously giving myself an excuse to make this again. Original video inspiration:
  22. MD_Ag

    Smoked Cheesy Meatloaf

    I made sure there was at least a half inch seal all around. As for preventing cheese ooze when slicing, I'll chalk that up to luck. I think the rind from the cheese wheel created a barrier that held a decent portion of the cheese back.
  23. MD_Ag

    Lamb Spare Ribs

    My wife loves lamb. So do I, but then I cry when I think of the price markup in this area. Would probably be over $20/lb here. Amazing cook that almost makes me want to do it anyway.
  24. The end of summer always means a large, meat filled gathering for me and my friends that we call "Meat Fest". One friend is smoking a turkey, another is making pit beef and ham for sandwiches. Me? Just these little guys: That's an 11.68 lb brisket (asked for a smaller one, after all) and an 11.26 lb pork belly. The beef was surprisingly well trimmed already, so I just had to remove some of the hard fat. Coat with the 50/50 S&P mix, and we're ready to go overnight on a 240° grill. The pork belly was my first example of the item. Interesting learning to remove the skin. Should have cut the belly into some sections first. I'm following a BBQpitboys recipe to cut the belly into small pieces, using a spicy southwestern rub. I added some extra brown sugar to tone it down some. The two trays of the chunks will sit in the fridge overnight, waiting to go on as soon as the brisket comes off. More updates in the morning.
  25. MD_Ag

    Meat Fest 2018

    Final pictures: The pit beef and ham were excellent. Sadly they cannot be recreated, as that chef was under the influence of multiple rum and cokes. He only knew a few ingredients based on what he found on the counter when he woke up. Sadly no shot of the entire turkey, but it had an awesome dark golden skin. I believe it was made on a pit barrel cooker. The brisket was, as suspected, way over done. I tried to make due with thicker slices, but most still fell apart. The cubes from the point were still pretty good. The pork belly was my favorite. Sweet and spicy and juicy and chewy. Some had a bit too much fat, but I don't think that can really be avoided. Not pictured are all the chips, dips, cookies, pasta salad, etc. that gave us something other than protein to consume. Thanks for reading along with the cook today.
×