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Buttburner

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  1. Like
    Buttburner reacted to Marty in HOT Ribs!!! - Frustrating Cook :)   
    This is where the temp just jumps on me. At the end of the cook where I put on a sauce. The temp has been rock stable and locked in for a bit under  three hours  and then I open the top and sauce the ribs.. The ribs are prefect just what I want. Then the temp takes off and by the time i catch it it has even got to 425 or more and I have a burned surface because the sugar has burned. It is not that the spike over cooks the whole rib but just  lays down a burned crust. Of course i am cooking at 350  and close enough to  the the burn point of the sugar that the spike does me in. At 275 you are so far from the burn point of sugar that you would really have to screw up to get to 425.
     
    The best way I make sense of it is that the temp is stable but a lot of lump is right at the launch temp and all that keeps it from lighting is lack of oxygen and  then I open the top.
     
    Any more I close the bottom vent completely and this I believe prevents fresh air being sucked through the bottom vent while the dome is open and fanning the fire and igniting all of the lump that is ready to burst into flames.
     
    . If I forget to open it back i can easily open it again as the temp drops and it comes back to temp. This as compared to a whole bed of glowing lump that needs to be pulled back.
     
    What you ended up with looks great and I am sure tasted great. It certainly was not a disaster like i have had.
     
    My guess is that had you closed the bottom vent completely when you opened the dome and then waited a minute or so after closing the dome before opening--the spike would have been much less.
  2. Like
    Buttburner got a reaction from CeramicChef in Lighting tip from a board n00b   
    I have never used a weed torch but from what I have seen I think it would light too many coals for a low and slow fire
     
    the Mapp torch provides precision in lighting just a small area if thats what you are after. 
     
    It lights so quickly that I dont really think the cost of the Mapp gas is much of an issue.
  3. Like
    Buttburner got a reaction from CeramicChef in Lighting tip from a board n00b   
    Thank you Ceramic Chef for this little tidbit!!
     
    I have tried my old propane torch in the past to light lump, but it took more time than it was worth. After reading your tip, I borrowed a Mapp torch we have at work and wow what a difference! I will have to buy one now. I know about Mapp gas but just never tried it on lighting lump!
  4. Like
    Buttburner got a reaction from Big Dawg in pizza without a stone?   
    thanks guys
     
    It all came back to me, I had done this a few times on my gasser many years ago in another lifetime. Then, it was real hard to control the temp and not burn the crust
     
    But with the Akorn, it was a piece of cake.
     
    Came out great. Very simple recipe 

  5. Like
    Buttburner got a reaction from BEER-N-BBQ by Larry in pizza without a stone?   
    thanks guys
     
    It all came back to me, I had done this a few times on my gasser many years ago in another lifetime. Then, it was real hard to control the temp and not burn the crust
     
    But with the Akorn, it was a piece of cake.
     
    Came out great. Very simple recipe 

  6. Like
    Buttburner reacted to Toe in Fired it up for the first time inbetween storms this weekend   
    I always suggest a spatchcocked (or butterflied) whole chicken. If you're not familiar with that, you basically cut out the backbone and then press the bird flat (cracking the breastbone). Here's a guide: http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/spatchcocking_and_butterflying_poultry.html
     
    The reason I suggest chicken is that it's pretty forgiving - you can cook it successfully at just about any temperature, so long as the final internal temperature of the meat is right. A probe placed in the thickest part of the breast should read about 160-165F. Remember that the actual sensor on your Maverick is near the tip, so that's the part that should be in the center. It's always a good idea to double-check with an instant-read thermometer, especially if you're new to this.
  7. Like
    Buttburner reacted to CeramicChef in Fired it up for the first time inbetween storms this weekend   
    +1^ on the spatchcocked chicken. For the first low-n-slow do a pork butt. They are simply impossible to screw up and they are very forgiving of mistakes!
  8. Like
    Buttburner got a reaction from Bigs in Loose Lower Vent   
    I have a new one and the vent is nice and snug
     
    I would say if you can close all the vents and snuff out your fire then its tight enough.
  9. Like
    Buttburner reacted to ckreef in Low and Slow keeps snuffing out   
    Keep in mind all individual Kamados are different from each other even within the same brand. Just because someone else's work with the vents at say .5 & .75 doesn't mean that is exactly what you need. Use other people's suggestions for a guideline then figure out how your particular kamado behaves.
    Being an Akorn with its bottom grate I seriously doubt that you are clogging the airflow through the grate. You almost can't clog it up even if you tried to.
    Skip the volcano crap. Fill the firebox full of lump (not Briquettes) all the way to just slightly below the 3 tabs and light it in one spot at the back.
    Check out my profile - my threads - there are a few lump experiments that prove just how hard it really is to clog an Akorn grate (I rate it at almost impossible)
    Shoot for a temp of 250* and whatever temp it settles at use it at that temp - your meat won't know the difference with anything between 225* - 300*. Once you get things worked out you can start shooting for a closer particular temp.
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