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Found 206 results

  1. I have a problem! It's a nice problem to have but it’s still a problem. Yep! My tomato plants are going crazy and I need to find ways to use all these tomatoes. I figured one way was to make a few pizzas. One is a version of Margherita Pizza utilizing lots of thin tomato slices. Here are most of the ingredients I used. Tomatoes sliced and ready to use. Fresh Basil and Oregano from my garden. Took everything out to my gas grill / outdoor prep area. Cut my dough in half And constructed my pizza. Here is the results. And plated with a nice IPA. Perfect crust. Yum!
  2. Hi everyone, Below is a video recipe in response to a discussion about deep dish pizza dough at http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/20554-chicago-style-pizza-questions/. The issue was whether corn meal or corn oil is used when making deep dish pizza dough. Here is the winning recipe: Corn Oil Based Deep Dish Dough Recipe: 20 oz AP flour (100%) 12 oz Water (60%) 4 oz Corn Oil (20%) 0.4 oz Sugar (2%) 0.4 oz Salt (2%) 0.4 oz yeast (2%) Mix together and knead. Video: http://youtu.be/q7GWHD3YZSw
  3. Due to thunderstorms, I had to do this in my oven. :/ Oven set at max temp of 525f. Set on my Kitchen Supply Old Stone (seriously great). I also used my new peel and pizza cutter, WOW! Homemade crust, Gattuso pizza sauce, pepperoni, mushrooms, green peppers, red onions, green olives, mozzarella, parmesan, sliced fresh garlic and bacon. Straight rain, the gazebo does the job, 90km/h wind gusts, it's useless. lol Thanks for looking! The mat is also new! I forgot to add it in one of my haul posts! \ Better than take out pizza any day. Even though it wasn't done on the kamado, it was still freakin amazing!
  4. I’ve made and posted this many time so this is more of just showing you what we had for dinner last night. (We had guests so the pictures aren’t great) Start out by dividing my dough. Then assemble my pizza. Now on my pre-heated (to 550) kamado. And done. Second pizza.
  5. I told my wife to get off the telephone and come into the kitchen....she had a nice pair to choose from. I was giving her all the warning I could before Teenage T-Rex found out that he could engage in his next feeding frenzy. I'd planned on doing this cook on the BigJoe, but I'd not cleaned up my pizza stone and other pizza cooking gear.....normally not an issue but there was an event one of them had to leave for early this evening.....so it was done indoors. It went together so fast that my first pie was rolled, sauced and topped and waiting when the oven finally beeped that warm-up was done. That's fast. Second pie was right behind and waiting. Feeling much better and moving much easier. Great thing was had the area to myself and engaged in some audio-therapy. Enjoyed most of this great album while getting everything cooked. Nothing screams Summer time like the Red Rocker. I'm looking forward to his new album release date in a couple weeks !!! This pair was done with a desire to make two light, yet flavor filled pizzas. Neither of us like the heavy, greasy, loaded pies that I used to make or that we usually wind up with at a pizza joint. Lighter and flavorful.....hmmmmn. It's a stretch for me because I love the toppings that I use.....and I tend to love too much of each. I think I succeeded with these.....just didn't quite get the tops done as well as my BigJoe would have. Gotta love that radiant heat coming off the dome. Even the use of the broiler in the oven just didn't get me there. A pair of these easy to work with and great tasting dough balls. Okay....here is the light yet flavorful part. Both dough balls were rolled out fairly thin. One was sauced with pesto sauce cut with a small amount of lemon juice. The other one was sauced with Cento brand San Marzano peeled tomatoes. I simply put the tomatoes on the dough...chopped them apart with a spoon and spread them along with some of sauce from the can. Both were hit with a generous amount of Italian seasonings and fresh ground pepper and then the toppings applied....very light on the mozzarella. These things are hugely flavorful and easy....just dump in a bowl and shake out the including topping packets and dressing. No plated pics.....sorry.....it would have required a fast action speed that I'm not yet capable of. T-Rex found out what was going on just as the second pie was finishing..........
  6. Ordered the Dough-Joe stone (14.5"x7.8") - really going to love this thing versus the other crappy cheap versions; have been without for a couple of months and that's much too long to not do pies. Ran at about 500 for 45 mins and dropped it on for about 9 minutes (turned at 4;5ish); crust was perfect, stone really held the heat well. Goes without saying, as others have praised it, but this is HIGHLY recommended if you're looking for a stone. Thanks to all who have referred it!
  7. Triple Pizza Pizzazz This was a Mother’s Day cook. Mrs. Smokehowze enjoys Kamado pizzas and especially likes a “white sauce” pizza in addition to the usual styles. Son and I did a bit of pizza pizzazz for dinner. We pretty much used John Setzler’s crust recipe expanded for three pizzas and shaped/rolled them into thin crispy crust. Add some Lazy Magnolia's Southern Pecan Nut Brown Ale as a beverage and finish the meal off with dessert of chocolate dipped strawberries specially ordered by son and daughter for their mother and it was a great day. We served the extra white sauce for dipping. The red sauce ‘Supreme” pizza used a leftover from scratch mushroom and vegetable tomato sauce as a base made earlier in the week for a pasta dish. A number of veggie toppings and mozzarella plus the sausage rounded it all out. In the morning, I made a fresh batch of bulk homemade Smokehowze blend hot & well-seasoned Italian sausage as a primary topping for this pizza. The sausage was precooked right before building the pies. I would have like the tomato to have cooked a bit more but these were not as ripe as I would prefer and all the store had. Oh well... It was still good! The two white sauce pizzas had a basic common uncooked white sauce perfected by my son and daughter – ricotta and Greek yogurt seasoned with herbs, fresh chopped garlic and cracked black pepper and allowed to develop in flavor during the day. One white pizza was spinach and roma tomato with heavy sauce and extra garlic – complemented with dollops of ricotta as an additional topping. The fresh spinach was blanched and ice water shocked and well drained before pie making started. Another white pizza was spinach and the Italian sausage - complemented with dollops of ricotta and a light layer of mozzarella cheese as an additional toppings. These pies were cooked on my Classic Kamado Joe using a double stone arrangement with air space between the deflector and the pizza stone which was additional raised by sitting it on some kiln spacers. Dome temperatures were 575 to 650 degrees and similar temps of the stones. The deflector also has one of my thin pizza stones on it that has a waffle air gap underside. My idea was to have the main pizza stone soak at the saturated temperature in the Classic (and not keep heating up from radiated heat from the main deflector) and let the additional further heated air rolling up the sides of the Kamado bring a “top cooking” heat stream at a bit higher temp to the toppings. This worked well along with the parchment to balance the cook between crust and topping Cook times were roughly 10 minutes each pizza cooked in sequence with a short recovery between pizzas. Started with parchment under the thin crust for the first 7-8 minutes to keep the crust from getting too crunchy. I used two oak chunks inserted into in the lower ash area to give a burning wood smoke effect more akin to a wood fire oven flavor element by having one aflame and one smoldering. A good time was had by all and especially by Mrs. Smokehowze!
  8. Momma wanted pizza so she got pizza. BBQ chicken pizza is one of her favorites and I had all the ingredients. Yeah! Made up some dough and let if proof for 8 hours. Got all my ingredients together all took them out to my work area on my gas grill. Rolled out the 1st pizza and placed it on some parchment paper. Sauced. Placed on the onion, red bell pepper, cilantro, chicken, and mozzarella cheese. On to my pre-heated (to 550) kamado for 6 to 7 minutes. As the song says “I’ve got the fire down below!” All done and cut. And second pizza. Yum!
  9. First run at pizzas tonight!!! Too busy to snap any more pictures but I got one!!!
  10. Did some research in the forums and got the guts to try pizza on the new Akorn. I wasn't really confident, because I wasn't sure I had the proper setup, but a trip to Wally World and I fired up the grill. I used a 16" pizza pan for a diffuser on the smoking stone hangers and I placed my pizza stone on the main grate. I started the grill and ran the temp up to 450 - 500. The kids all prepared their pizzas the way they wanted them, and off to the grill we went. Taking some advise from the forums, I placed the pizzas on the stone with some corn meal to keep them from sticking and closed the lid. I monitored the progress through the top vent and when the cheese started to crisp up, I opened the lid and checked the crust. The results were 6 perfectly made pizzas (at least there were no complaints - and seconds were requested my most). The bottom line was another successful cook on the Akorn. I am absolutely loving this grill. Again, thanks to everyone for all of your input in the past. Using the advice of the members here, I am sure I can tackle any grilling project. Ever forward. (I will post some pictures tomorrow, as I cannot sync my iphone with my laptop) Sean
  11. We got the ham going a bit late today. So while we waited we did Pizza before we starved. This is an unusual pizza that really wakes up your taste buds. It is a bit like an Olive Brushetta. My wife likes the big thick puffy crust so that is what we did. Spread the formed pizza dough with the Red Pepper Pesto and then cover with the olive salad. Cover with cheese. Slide on to the Pizza stone and cook until done. Red Pepper Pesto 1/2 cup of roughly chopped roasted red peppers from a jar. Drain and pat dry 1TBS capers rinsed 1TBS olive oil more if needed 2 TBS toasted walnuts Process in a food processor until finely chopped. Transfer to bowl. Olive Salad 1/2 cup of green olives 1/4 cup black olives 1/4 cup chopped sweet cherry peppers 1/4 cup chopped pickled vegetables 2 cloves of garlic, minced 1/4 tsp ground black pepper 1 tsp dried Italian herb blend No need to clean the processor. Pulse the Olive Salad until coarsely chopped into 1/4 inch or less pieces.
  12. I guess first is dough since that needs to be done the day BEFORE you cook Pizza. Having the dough slowly rise in the fridge for at least 24 hours gives you a much better Pizza Crust. I use King Arthur "Bread" Flour for normal hand tossed or thicker crust, if I want to do a thin crust I use Antimo Caputo 00 Flour . Both of these flours have a high protein content between 12.5% to 12.7%. Because of the difference in water absorption I basically do not give an exact amount of water to use, I make up close to 2 cups of warm 115 degree water and may or may not use it all, I pour about 1 1/2 cups of water into the mixer and then go from there as it starts to mix I just add a spoonful at a time until I see the just right hydration point. Which to me is just when the dough starts to get sticky to the touch. The doughs for standard or thick and thin crust are totally different for me, thin is different flour, different amount of water, NO Oil, NO sugar/Honey and higher cooking temp. Thin is a more Neapolitan style crust/dough. So this recipe I am just going to do the standard crust. I always make a larger than normal amount because I like to make 4 Hamburger Buns from the same batch of dough to have within the next 2 days. 4 Cups of King Arthur Bread Flour I make up about 2 cups of 115 degree water, I do not use it all I just add until I get the right consistency which is just starting to get sticky in the bowl and fingertips I add a good tablespoon of Honey to the water and stir to dissolve and give the yeast something to chew on. To the water I add 2 teaspoons of regular yeast to proof it, usually about 5 minutes or so. I add 2 nice pinches of Kosher Salt which is around 2 teaspoons to the water to dissolve. Just before I add the water to the four I add 2 tablespoons of Olive Oil, stir well and pour about 3/4 of it into flour. The addition of the oil and the sugar/honey means you can cook this dough at a lower temp (480-490)and get a very nice crunchy, crispy outer layer and chewy center. Turn on mixer with Dough Hook. I add water as needed while its mixing until I get the hydration just right. This usually takes about 6-8 minutes, though sometimes can take a bit longer I think I have the mixer (Kitchenaid) on 4. When it starts to look and feel close I cut off a chunk and then slowly pull the dough in several directions until I can get it to "Windowpane" which is to stretch very thin so that you can almost see through it when you hold it up to the light without it tearing. If it doesn't windowpane then keep mixing until it does. Once you get the dough properly kneaded I then cut off 4 chunks of 100-105 grams each and roll them into balls and place into a round cake pan that is thoroughly greased with olive oil, use enough oil so that you can roll the dough balls around and coat them evenly in oil. I sprinkle usually Montreal Steak Seasoning, or Sesame Seeds, or Dehydrated Onions on top of each ball then stretch plastic wrap over the pan and put into fridge for Burgers in a couple days or so. Take the rest of the dough roll into a ball and then slide into a gallon size ziplock bag that you have oiled well with Olive oil and place into fridge until about 5 hours before you plan on cooking your Pizza. I usually cook about 5pm so I pull mine out just before Noon and let rest on counter. I start my Kamado at around 4pm, takes between 45-60 minutes for grill to get to 480-490 which is perfect because you want a nice slow steady rise in temp in order to get the stone fully heated through. If you go much over 500 degrees in a Kamado or any grill when using dough with Oil and Sugar in it you are going to get one of two things. Either a crust where you get the bottom nice and crispy and that perfect dark golden brown with just a few little darker spots and toppings that are no where near done. OR toppings that get close to done with a full on burnt bottom crust. Kamado's or really any other grill are NOT "Pizza ovens" in a classic pizza oven all the heat is ABOVE the stones and uses a very high 900+ degree heat that slowly heats the what are usually 2" thick fire bricks on the bottom of oven, that thick firebrick is probably not as hot as a 1" thick Pizza Stone in a 480 degree Kamado and all the heat in the Pizza Oven comes from the top down, on a Grill it is the Bottom up. Thus on a grill you need lower overall temps in order to get the toppings nice and cooked before you burn the bottom and it is best to get your Pizza Stone as close to the Dome as you can. this gives you as close to a Pizza Oven as you can get without building yourself a real Pizza Oven. I set my Kamado up (happens to be a Vision grill but all are basically the same) with 2 stones, I use a 1" thick Lava Stone on the plate setter just above the charcoal. I pretty much fill the firebowl or close to it with quality Lump Charcoal, I start it with a Weed Torch which takes between 30-60 seconds and then place 1 chunk of Pecan Wood on top for smoke, I put both of the grates in then I add bricks on the top grate and then put the Pizza Stone, (I recommend a 1" thick Dough Joe Pizza Stone) on top of bricks this set up brings the pizza to as close as I can get it to Dome. It also slows down the air flow which is why it takes so long for it to get to 480-90 degrees. This is what my Stone set up looks like. I start pulling and pushing the dough into shape usually just after I start the Grill. I put a little flour, (try to use as little flour as will do the job) on my large cookie sheet which I use as a makeshift Pizza Peel and then knuckle the dough allowing it to just self stretch over my knuckles to get the center started then I put on the floured sheet and start pushing the dough from center out to edges until I get about 15" and then I let it rest right there until Grill reaches about 400 degrees. This is what it looks like at that point. At around 400 degrees or so I have probably got about 5-10 minutes-ish before I reach the optimum 480-490. So I start building my Pizza about now. First thing I do is to lift one half of the dough up, fold over on itself and then spread a fairly generous amount of Semolina Flour (use plenty of the Semolina this both makes the dough slide easily and adds a nice crunch to the bottom of crust, it also gives a good buffer between dough and stone, most any burnt Semolina will remain on stone when you take the Pizza off) onto Cookie sheet pizza peel, then same on other half, then I give her a shake shake back and forth and make sure it slides nice and easy, this shrinks the diameter down from 15" to an exact 14.5"" to fit on my 14.5" Dough Joe Stone right to the edge. (The dough will shrink more than 1/2" if it has not rested long enough) For Sauce I usually use a combo of Enrico's which I thinly spread over most of the dough thicker near the outer edges and in the center none. I then add to that some really nice Sun Dried Tomato Tapenade that I get from Harris Teeter I am sure there are several others equally as good. I dab the tapenade all around, its a very tomatoey, sun dried almost sweet kick, just adds a layer of flavor without much moisture. Sauce combo. Here is the dough at this point. Now I start to add the veggies, my usual Pizza I use "Sweet Yellow Bell Pepper", "Fresh Jalapeno Slices" , "Red Onion" "Fresh Cremini Mushrooms" and Napa Bistro Garlic Stuffed Olives that I slice up. I find this is a perfect combination for my wifes and I taste. Here it is with veggies, and always I add my veggies on top of sauce first, then cheese on top of veggies, and then meat on top in that order. This cooks the veggies perfectly. I then add my Cheese, I use the best fresh Mozzarella I can find which is usually from Costco, I use fairly large pieces and scatter them around evenly. I then add a copious amount of the finest Pepperoni I can find, which is "Uncured Applegate Farms Pepperoni" its large diameter very good pepperoni that I get sliced fresh at Wholefoods, this pic shows Pepperoni and grill at 480 degrees. I also sprinkle a good dusting of Feta crumbles on top of Pepperoni. Here it is on top of Pizza Stone just before closing lid. Now it becomes a game of peekaboo, I keep an eye on it through the top vent until I start to see at least some browning on pepperoni then I crack open the lid just enough to reach in with a spatula to lift up dough to check the bottom, I do this until it reaches that perfect golden brown with just a few dark spots, this means the perfect very crisp layer. Also in these last couple of minutes I close the top vent completely this builds up the heat under the dome and finishes browning/melting the toppings. At 480 degrees, with oil and sugar in dough with stone as close to top as you can get you should get the bottom of crust perfect crisp and the toppings nicely browned and done while the inside of dough is nice and soft with a slight chew. I then slide the pizza on top of my cookie sheet using the spatula to push, that I now have a metal cooling rack on top of it so that the Pizza crust stays crispy until the very last piece. Any water, excess moisture drains to the cookie sheet which I have placed a couple of paper towels on to catch whatever falls. This way crust stays perfect just the way you came off the stone. I slice it up, then add either fresh Basil and or Fresh Spicy Greek Oregano on top, plus a few dabs of Basil Pesto around the crust. crunchy, chewy, crispy, as good as it gets. I Literally can not even eat delivery Pizza or Costco and all the other Pizzas that we used to like anymore.
  13. Zucchini Crust Pizza – It’s a Winner! In our current low carb family diet regime, the Smokehowze clan has been clamoring for something close to real pizza so I investigated alternate non-bread crust pizzas. Having cooked baked goods using zucchini, the idea of a zucchini crust pizza was appealing. Here is the article I used as the basics for the crust although the idea is pretty straight forward: http://www.recipegirl.com/2014/04/24/zucchini-pizza-crust/ Dinner Time! BTW, at the same time, my son and I made a cauliflower pizza crust and after the pre-bake step there was clearly a better “crust” using the zucchini. The difference was striking and we did not even use the cauliflower crust. We crumbled it up and saved it as a side dish for another meal. After this experiment cook, zucchini is the go-to for an alternate non bread pizza crust. The Details Most posts on things like alternate non-bread pizza crusts do not provide many photos of all the steps. I have done that to assist mastering the process. I bought 10 small zucchini at the market (no large ones were available) hoping for two larger pizzas. This was not to be the case. I probably needed 7 or 8 more of the zucchini. After squeezing the water out, we had 4 packed cups of shredded zucchini. This was enough to make a crust mixture for a 12 inch and a 9 inch pizza crust of good thickness. The 12 inch used about 2 ½ to 3 cups of the zucchini mixture. So … for two 12 inch round pizzas I would estimate to use 18 small zucchini or 6 large zucchini. Cooking on parchment and cast iron was a winner, but I suppose regular pizza pans would work also. I may need to buy a second Academy Griddle so next time I can do two 12 inch pizzas at same time. Leftovers of these pizzas is a good thing since they do take a while to fix due to the almost 1 hour total pre-bake time. To me, these crusts could be fixed ahead and refrigerated, then allowed to warm to room temp for use. For squeezing out the water after shredding the unpeeled zucchini (the drier the zucchini, the better the crust) I used a “nut milk bag”. Like this one: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KTIZZWQ/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 These study fine mesh bags are great for doing this and cheese and such. A lot better than cheese cloth or a dish towel. And well worth the price. Easy to clean, too. We squeezed 2 ½ cups of liquid out the zucchini. Save this juice for other purposes. Like a “healthy” beverage such as this Pisco drink we invented while waiting on the pre-bake. Heh! Heh! Made with the juice, some sweetener, lime juice and Pisco white spirits. Stir with crushed ice. It was pretty good for a health drink! You don't have to give up everything on lo carb do you? The Zucchini Crust Mix To make the crust mix, for 4 packed cups of the squeezed shredded zucchini, we added: · 4 large eggs · ½ cup all-purpose flour (could use a gluten free flour mix) · 1 cup finely grated parmesan cheese · 1 cup finely grated mozzarella cheese · 2-3 teaspoons Italian Seasoning mix · 2 teaspoons Garlic Powder · 2 Tablespoons Olive oil Notes: Run coarse grated shredded cheese through food processor with chopping blade if required. The Italian Seasoning mix was 1 tsp each dried basil & oregano, 1/2 tsp each dried parsley & marjoram, and ¼ tsp dried thyme. The Mixture Before the Pre-Bake We preheated the oven to 400 degrees for the pre-bake on the crusts. We used cast iron and covered with parchment paper that was spray with non-stick oil spray. The cast iron was NOT preheated. The 12 inch pizza (the “large”) was cooked on my Academy Sports cast iron reversible griddle using the flat side. The 8 inch pizza (small) was done in a cast iron frying pan. The crust mixture was cooked at 400 for about 30 minutes rotating the pans between the upper and lower racks until they were taking on a nice browning and starting to stiffen up. Remove from oven and flip over using a second flat sheet pan and another piece of sprayed parchment as an aid to avoid breaking the crust. Cook for an additional 15 minutes until the remaining crust side has a nice brown. Use your judgement. At this point remove from the oven and let cool slightly. The crusts are now ready for the toppings. They will be firm but not super stiff. At this point, given the good cooking smells one must resist eating the crust! Well, maybe just take a small sample off an edge. After the Pre-Bake Here we are ready to build pizzas. After construction, cook them at 400 for 15 (maybe 20) minutes until it looks right. Rotate oven racks as needed. If desired, you can do a finish for appearance with a quick (and watchfully careful) touch of the broiler. The Pizza Toppings They looked like this – topped and ready for final baking For both pizzas, since I was out of the Centos crushed tomato we normally used to make a seasoned homemade sauce, I grabbed an orphaned bottle of Bertolli marinara pasta sauce out the cabinet. Here is the detail of the Large Pizza: The large pizza was sauced and topped with onion, green bell pepper, sliced mushrooms (sautéed lightly ahead of time) and my homemade Cajun Smokehowze Hot-N-Spicy bulk pork sausage. In Prep: After Cooking: Here is the detail of the Small Pizza: The small pizza was sauced and topped with onion, green bell pepper, sliced roma tomatoes and my homemade Cajun Smokehowze pork loin Canadian Bacon. In Prep: After Cooking Success! A Tasty, Filling, and Low Carb Zucchini Pizza Crust Result These pizzas are quite filling. For three of us, the 12 and 8 inch pizzas had some leftovers. Which is good. This crust is flavorful and rich, has a good texture and holds up as a slice of pizza that you can hold in your hand without it wilting and folding up. Next time, these get cooked on Big(Red) Joe to add some wood fired flavor. Yes – there will definitely be a next time. These crusts are that good. We did them in the oven for the first time out to better track the process and result. I recommend you try this, even just as a change of pace from a bread crust based pizza. Enjoy!
  14. Portobello Mushroom “Pizza” Caps This is a non-traditional approach to "pizza" I ran across on the web. Basically this recipe idea: http://kristinerudolph.com/portobello-pizzas/. It’s really not pizza per se, but it made a very tasty meal nonetheless. A large Portobello mushroom cap is de-stemmed and scraped clean of the gills using a spoon. A layer of bulk sausage is pressed into the cap. I used my homemade kick-butt Hot-N-Spicy bulk pork sausage for some zing. The cap and sausage is baked at 350 on a rack until the sausage reaches 145 degrees. Like for 20-30 minutes. This now forms the “pizza” base. When the sausage was at 145-150 we removed from the oven and added a light layer of homemade pizza sauce atop the sausage, some mozzarella and cheddar cheese, and onion and bell pepper toppings. We had sauteed the stems and gills and added that as a final “sprinkle” topping. The full “pizza” is then baked until the cheese is melted and browned and the whole is well heated throughout and the sausage finishes it cooking. For maybe 15 minutes. Is the result like a real pizza? No. Is the result very good and tasty? Yes. Is it worth cooking? Definitely. Would we do it again? You bet! BTW.. just one of the caps (at least the way we fixed them) is pretty filling if you have any sides. One and a half and you will be well satiated. Next time this will be cooked on one of the Joe's to add that wood fired element. This is Gonna Be Good Stuffed and After the Second Baking Let’s Eat (Note: The sides shown in the photo below were a cauliflower "tater tot'' attempt. While the mushroom "pizza" was great, the non-potato tater tots were not. Sometimes substitute approaches just don't make it out the starting gate. LoL)
  15. After the meatball experience the other day....my family ate them up quicklike.....in subs & on Angel hair pasta. My wife had suggested I use them on pizza.....then said that's what she wanted yesterday. So I had fun making up another batch and followed John's video recipe. Seems they laugh at my signing along.....grossly out of tune....when I get certain music krunk up in the kitchen.....so I appeased them on this cook. Straight up blues jams without a whole lot of vocals. Couldn't help myself after a couple of brews, though....had to break out some classic stuff and let it ride. Grilling & cooking tunes sure do really make it even more relaxing. Had to taste test one...Lawd have mercy ! Rinsed off my trusty pizza stone and let it dry. This thing has been killer. Soapstone performance has been flawless. I really should spend a few minutes and scrub it off and leave it sitting out. They look great when cleaned up.....I just need to spend a few minutes and do it. Later on I it set the kamado up for pizza and let it come up to temp and heat soak the stones. Son's pie for when he got home from his girlfriend's house. Wife & I had this 'un I didn't do so well on pics of finished eats.....things were moving pretty fast on back-to-back pies. Awesome weather again today. Gonna find something to grill later on. We are so fortunate this February compared to last February when the ice storms left everyone powerless and stranded. It was crazy how the same weather that many of you live through every year can shut this area down. We just aren't set up for it, nor do we know how to drive in it. I gotta admit it was fun putting my truck in 4WD and driving around in all the snow & ice while our cellphones recharged and we hunted for hot coffee.
  16. Part One: The Heart My Valentine wanted Pizza to celebrate the day. I realized it needed to be stepped up a notch. For the dough Caputo Altima 00 flour was used, with a good Italian Olive oil. The Dough was made from scratch this morning, and allowed to rest all day. The dough proved to stretch easily and easy to shape. A heart shaped pie was formed, cheese was layered at the edge, then covered with dough. The pie was sauced, and topped with diced portabella mushrooms and covered with heart-shaped pepperoni. It was cooked on the Kamado Joe Big Joe.
  17. So I have questions on pizza from CGA what's the set up you experienced cookers use? I have the smoke stone and the stock rack. My temp control is pretty good right now. Do I use stone, grate, what temps, any advice or info greatly appreciated??
  18. Hey guys, Just a heads up that some Lowe's are clearing out the BS ovens. I went to a Lowes that's on the way home from work and saw this. Thought I'd pass it along. That's a steal of a price. YMMV
  19. Mini Deep dish pizza and fruit pies on the Big Joe, with the Joe Junior doing some support work (the sauce simmering) . This is a painless low-prep gameday appetizer, with enough heft to keep the tummy grumbles away until the game ends. No preparation of the dough is required in advance, if you purchase filo dough from the grocery store (usually found in the frozen section). This dough has a paper-thin flaky texture which is nice. Deep dish pizza using a mini muffin pan as a form will produce 12 at once. Also Cherry, Apple and Blueberry (red, white and blue) pies fixed in a similar fashion. Mini muffin pans are coated with butter, and pre-made filo dough is pressed into the pan. A simple pizza sauce was prepared using: 1 eight ounce can of tomato sauce 1 six ounce can of tomato paste 2 tsp of pizza seasonings 1/2 tsp cayenne powder 1 tsp kosher salt 1/2 tsp ground black pepper 1/2 cup mushrooms, cut into quarter inch cubes. 1/4 cup brown sugar. (use truvia for baking, or truvia brown sugar substituted for a lower carb alternative). Mix the ingredients in a cast iron pot, place it in your Kamado (Junior in my case) running at 275. The advantage to the cast iron and low temperature is the ability to simmer without stirring, or burning. To save time, you can rapidly get it up to a simmer on the stove, then move it to the Kamado to simmer for 30-40 minutes. Once the sauce is ready, spoon in the sauce about 3/8 inch deep into the cup you have formed with the filo dough in the muffin pan. Cut pepperoni into little quarter inch pieces, and sprinkle liberally over the surface of the sauce in the cups. Sprinkle cheese over the top, and apply a black olive slice. Bake at 350 over indirect heat, with an additional ceramic plate under the muffin pan, until the dough and the toppings turn golden. The fruit pies use the same preparation of the filo dough, then pie filling is spooned in to the shell. You can get fruit in heavy syrup (like the cherries I got), and add truvia for baking in order to sweeten and thicken. This makes them more carb friendly. Bake at 350 until the dough turns golden brown. The butter in the tin helps brown and crisp the filo dough, and makes the pan easily release the mini-deep dish and the fruit pies. This dish presents really well as a finger food for gatherings, and doesn't result in dead pizza bones left all over the place. All of the pies are single serving size, and gives you the opportunity to have a good variety of flavors available for your guests. And of course, you can make a variety of pizzas, not just mushroom pepperoni and olive.
  20. Hi all, first cook today. Went with Pizza after buying a Master Forge Pizza stone kit from Lowes. Used the following dough recipe from Fire Tender in another thread: 3 cups flour, ( either all purpose or bread ) 1 & 1/3 cup warm water 1 pack yeast (Instant Rise from Walmart) 2 pinch salt 1 spoon sugar 1 flugelhorn olive oil Mix with dough hook & Adjust with added flour till makes dough ball & mix on low speed for 10 min. Divide , cover with damp cloth & let rise for 1 hour. And then I used this recipe for sauce from Food Network: Ingredients 1 can (28-ounces) whole peeled tomatoes, in juice (I used crushed) 1 small white or sweet onion, finely diced and minced 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced 3 to 4 fresh basil leaves (I used dry) 1 teaspoon dried oregano Pinch salt Pinch fresh ground black pepper Pinch sugar, optional 2 tablespoons olive oil, to saute Sauted onions, then garlic, then added crushed tomatoes, salt, pepper, oregano, and basil for 10 minutes in a saucepan. Even on low on my gas range it started to splatter though. Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/basic-pizza-sauce-recipe.html?oc=linkback I then heated the grill to 500 per my new Maverick 732, that thing is awesome. Put it on the stone, and then waited for it to get darkened on top. The result was a crispy crust, but not burnt on the bottom. It was pretty good. One side was grape tomatoes and mozzerrella, and the other was leftover taco chicken, onions, and cheddar cheese. All in all it worked out, but some of my problems that I would like help with are: 1) How do you roll out the dough without holes getting in the middle? 2) How do you get it on the Peel and off of the peel easily? It took me a few tries and a knife to loosen the dough. 3) Any other tricks or tips? This was on an Akorn with a Walmart pizza pan diffuser, a pizza stone on the main grate, and then another pizza pan we had lying around on top of the warming rack to help cook the toppings (from reading on here). Thanks for reading and for any advice! I love this thing and have a pork tenderloin brining for tomorrow, and a pork butt in the freezer for when I am courageous enough to try. Time for some beers!
  21. I can't compete with Bosco's -18 cook, but it was snowing here today. I decided to try the following KAF recipe. http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2015/01/05/best-pizza-youll-ever-make/ Most of my pizza cooks in the last year have been lean dryer dough cooked >750 F. This dough was has 74% hydration, so it has to be launched on parchment. There is also a hint of sugar, I suspect this helps with browning rather than taste. These pies were baked at 550-600 F ready for the pictures, they will be uploaded from another device. thanks for watching... the dough rose 2-3X overnight Shaped dough proofing. The variation in size of the dough balls is intentional. Lets add a little color to the pies! Tomato, basil, fresh mozzs... Pepperoni The Joe is ready to cook! Pepperoni loaded and cooking Pepperoni done! how is that for the "windowpan test" ? Veggie pizza YUMM!!! Crust, perfection! the classic top down shot
  22. Three Pizza’s and Beer Had not cooked pizza in a while and there was a collective family request that could not be turned down. Even though it was a nasty rainy night in Georgia, i coped by rolling Joe under the edge of the covered porch and we pushed on. This cook was a family project in preparation, making the pies, cooking, and of course devouring them. Daughter did prep work, son built the pies, son and I cooked them and my wife was all smiles as we cooked and she enjoyed a glass of wine and the after work socialization and relaxation. Another great time of family gathered in the kitchen. Some Pies Ready to Cycle Through Big(Red)Joe Some Slices of Pizza Goodness And a Few Beers, Too The Cooks Joe was at roughly 600-625 degrees and the pies were cooked from 4 to 7 minutes started on parchment paper which was pulled from 2 to 4 minutes depending in the pizza. For the white pizza I dropped the temps down to about 550 and did it as the last pizza. I added small oak chunks just protruding into the ash area through the lower vent for the wood fired smoked element. They were cooked in the order listed below. I think I finally have my Big Joe figured out for how I want it setup for pizza. These were some of the best pies we have fixed, and the crust and topping cooking was pretty well balanced. We used Publix ready made pizza dough picked up on the way home. The red sauce was Centos crushed tomatoes with dried herbs (uncooked) left to marry the flavors for most of the day. This recipe: http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/14646-a-no-cook-pizza-sauce/ The white sauce was ricotta and Greek yogurt with herbs and minced fresh garlic. It was developed by my daughter. #1 Veggie Pie (onion, bell peppers, roma tomatoes, & Kalamata olives) over 6 cheese Italian blend & Mozzarella Ready to Cook: All Done: (edited to fix link to show the cooked pizza) #2 Double Pepperoni over 6 Cheese Italian Blend plus a bit of Garlic and extra Mozzarella Ready to Cook: All Done: #3 White Pizza - Spinach, Tomato, and Ricotta Cheese Chunks over White Sauce Base Ready to Cook: All Done: The Cooking Set-Up Here is my setup on Big Joe using the Divide & Conquer system and expansion grate. It provided very stable temperatures on the cooking stone on the top of the expansion rack from one cook to the next and very nicely matched dome temps for the topping cook. With the extra “defector” in the middle of the stack, the heating up and temperature soaking did take a bit longer.
  23. Every pizza I make is the best yet. They just get better and better. Tonight I made my own dough using the "Artisan bread in five method". Toppings were fresh mozzarella, Italian sausage, green peppers, portobello mushrooms and red onions. Cooked at 500 for about 20 minutes. The dough made all the difference it was slightly crispy on the bottom but chewy at the same time.
  24. Hi Gurus! Last Friday evening I did PaPa Murphy's in the belly of TheBeast! Quick and simply and delicious. Here's the set-up ... baking stone (YEAH! That thing is HEAVY!) on the extended cooking grate over the main grate. No diffuser. Dome temp at 425F per PaPa Murphy's direction. I normally do pizza at higher temps, but PaPa Murphy's dough is literally engineered for 425F since most home overs don't get above 500F. Here are a couple of pics of the unbaked pies with a few extras from the refrigerator here at ChezChef: The first pie is thin crust the second is regular crust. Both pies were augmented with jalapeño andouille and spicy litallian sausage cooked on TheBeast and some more low moisture cheese. Here are pics of the two pies after their being cooked: The frist pie got too close to the edge of the KK baking stone and I was a minute or so late in pulling it, hence the burned edge. I wasn't about to let that happen on the second pie! Both crusts were crispy and the pies were delicious. For store-bought pizza, this was the best I've had in some time. Quick and easy peasy! The beverage of the evening was a relatively new ale from Shiner ... The Wild Hare. Very good tasting and I heartily recommend it!
  25. So we all work very hard at holding temperatures down for slow cooking. Why do I have difficulty getting hot enough (500+ degrees) quickly to bake pizza? I swear if I was slow cooking and didn't pay attention to the grill, it would be 450 degrees in minutes. Does anyone have a good method for quickly building heat in a kamado?
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