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  1. Howdy Gurus! It's finally time to say goodbye to the holidays. The 12 Days of Christmas are about gone and the Holiday Season is over. I figured it was time to move on and I pulled a turkey roast that I cooked for Thanksgiving out of the freezer. Some of you may remember this cook .... here is a picture of a turkey and the turkey roast from that cook. The roast is on the far right of the picture. So I asked SWMBO, my brother the BBQ Mooch, and my neighbors if they would like some smoked turkey enchiladas. The resounding answer: YES! So I'm presenting a dish of the smoked turkey enchies I made this past weekend. Here is a look at the turkey roast in a solo shot. The paring knife is for a size reference. These roasts have elastic netting to keep the preformed turkey roast in its formed shape. Here is a shot of that netting cut off the turkey roast. Here is a shot of the turkey roast right after shredding it. It's really a lot of turkey! For an idea of how much turkey this is, here is a shot with a blue latex glove for a size comparison. The pile of turkey is about 1.5" high. Now we got to the enchie assembly. First a layer of spinach and a finely diced sweet onion ... Next we add a goodly portion of the shredded smoked turkey roast ... And now we're going to used some smoked cheddar cheese I smoked back in early December along with some of the enchie sauce ... Repeat 4 more times for this particular dish and pour the remainder of the enchie sauce on top of the enchies in the dish ... Now top with cheese and a couple of different types of peppers, diced Hatch papers and roasted poblanos, and it's ready to go to the belly of TheBeast ... Here are the enchies right after getting on the grate ... Here is the dish of enchies after 75 minutes at 325F ... And finally, for your viewing pleasure, here is the money shot with Pete The Salt Pig and his new Pig Minions supervising ... So, stick a fork in the Holidays, they are done for the next 11 months or so! I hope your Holiday Season was as good as mine and that you enjoyed the show here. Now it's onward and upward for 2015!
  2. 25th Akorn turkey, 10 lb. WW product fridge thawed, brined, rubbed and butter flavored cooking oil sprayed. 2 hours 45 minutes at 325°F used lump charcoal started and seeded with a few brickets.Skin was crispy and meat moist. Rested openly for about an hour.
  3. For right now, this is a Stub article. I am in the middle of cooking and do not have time to post yet. On the cook, Two Chateaubriands with Wine and Brown sauce reduction sauce. One of the filets is being prepared sous vide prior to the final sear. Done on the Big Joe. (post script update) The challenge on the Chateaubriand was SWMBO wanted the meat well done. This is not the way the meat is typically prepared. To achieve well-done, but retain the juiciness of the meat, it was cooked Sous Vide (vacuum sealed in a bag with seasoning, in a temperature controlled water bath until well done). The water bath was set to 160 degrees, and cooked for 1 hour per inch of thickness). The package was left sealed while the meat rested, and later, the small amount of juices from the bag was added to the reduction sauce, which was simmering on the stove top. The second Chateaubriand was thrown on the Big Joe, which was configured for indirect heat and 200 degrees. It was cooked until the internal temperature hit 135. The last 45 minutes of the cook, the second cut was foiled to help maintain moisture. A reverse sear is not traditional for this cut of meat, but, considering one of the cuts was going to be cooked sous vide, it made no sense to do the sear first (it would soften the flavorful crust on the outside of the meat). The Big Joe was re-configured for direct, and with the cast iron griddle and grate. Once the griddle surface was up to temperature, both pieces of meat were seared on their two flat faces. The meat was moved over to the grate, and turned on their edges to crisp the bacon. The meat was rested, Sliced, and served with the reduction sauce which had been simmering all day (yum). Roasted injected, rubbed 15.25 pound Turkey with classic bread stuffing Done on the Primo Oval Jr. (post script update) Classical stuffing was prepared, and seasoned with classical Italian seasonings. The turkey was basted in butter, then injected with a mixture of butter, chicken stock and brown sugar. Stubbs poultry rub was liberally applied to the outside of the bird. The Primo Oval Junior was configured for indirect and 350 degrees. A drip pan was rested upon the ceramic diffusers to discourage flare-ups. The Junior was allowed to sit at temperature for an hour before the cook started, SWMBO didn't want smoke flavor to permeate the meat. The extra warm-up time allowed for any of the smoky character to burn off the charcoal. Mid-way through the cook the temperature was reduced to 275; the bird was cooking too fast. The goal had been for it to complete in 3 hours, which would have timed it for the meal. There was no problem with the reduction; the skin had already done the majority of it's crisping. The turkey was pulled at 171 (did I mention my wife is pink-meat phobic?). Scratch Sourdough pull apart rolls Done on the K7 (post script update) The rolls were made from scratch, but slightly modified to have a softer texture on the outside. I wanted to avoid the normal "crustiness" associated with sourdough. The tin was coated in melted butter. Three balls of dough were inserted into the baking tin, then sprinkled with salt. They were baked in the Kamado K7 at 350 degrees until the tops started to turn golden. The simmering butter in the bottom of the tin did a great job of browning the rolls in a controlled fashion. It also helped keep the three balls of dough from fusing completely during the cooking process. This made the three lobes easy to pull apart when they were ate. As this was the first time to try this dough as a roll, two additional sizes were tried, one which I felt would be too small, and one which seemed like too much dough. The test rolls, allowed me to check doneness for the rest of the rolls, and give me a direction to go for future cooks, should the size turn out wrong on the rest of the rolls. As it turned out, luck was with me, and the best-guess size ended up being perfect. Glazed carrots done on Stovetop. (post script update) This is a simple dish, the carrots were simmered for 30 minutes with the lid closed in butter and water. After the carrots started to get tender, brown sugar and ginger was added to the small amount of water, and the cook was finished with the lid off to thicken the sauce. The carrots finished tender and sweet. Mashed potatoes done on Stovetop. (post script update) This was to the same recipe posted before. Southern style cream gravy done on Stovetop. (post script update) This was to the same recipe posted before, but without the Cornish game hen chunks.
  4. Brine Ingredients: -Water 1 Gallon -Salt 2 cups -Sugar 1 cup - Parsley -2 garlic cloves Directions: simmer al the ingredients, when the brine is cold add another gallon of water and leave the turkey with the brine 24-48 hrs. in the fridge. Butter mix Ingredients: -Butter 4-5 bars aprox, -Cranberries -Parsley -Rosemary Directions: Chop and mix the ingredients and put the mix between the skin and the meat. Grilling Directions: Grill temp. 350F / 180C Cook 25 minutes per Kilo plus 20 minutes at the end. Buen Provecho!!! :-)
  5. I have a 16 lbs turkey that I'm planning on cooking on my Akorn. Based on how I have cooked chicken I looked into doing vertical cooking (ie beer can style) but it appears the turkey is too tall. It appears the Akorn has got about 11.5" clearance before your seriously blocking airflow. So I was thinking spatchcocking but I am concerned that once I cut the bird it will not fit in the 18.5" grate of the Akorn. It is sort of hard to tell if it will fit but I did do a worse case scenario of wrapping a string around the bird to see its circumference which is unfortunately like 25". Although all turkeys are different in shape I'm curious how big of a bird in pounds people have spatchcocked on the Akorn? As a side note I'm planning on dry brining + injecting.
  6. Like most, we have leftover turkey. I get tired of eating plain old turkey for days on end. I like to try to re purpose some of these leftovers. I took the holy trinity (onions, carrots & celery. Also know as a mirepoix) and sweated them in a hot pan. Once translucent, I added a qt of home made stock, brought to a boil, then simmered for 20 minutes. In a separate small skillet, I created a roux (cooking raw flour in melted butter). I added the roux to the pot pie filling to thicken it. I greased a 10" Lodge Cast Iron skillet with butter flavored crisco. I cheated and used a premade pie crust. Cooked at 450 for approx 20 minutes. You should make some type of slices in the top crust. The"BGC" was just a little fun.
  7. Oh Give Thanks - a Turkey Meal Lord, we give thanks for the bountiful harvest and the presence of family to celebrate what you have provided for us…. Thanksgiving Turkey Meal The Cook An 18 lb Costco Butterball fresh turkey "water only injected" (this is not a salted/flavored brine injection processed turkey). Brined (salt, sugar, apple juice, garlic and onion powder, poultry seasoning , and sriracha) for 24 hours and no injection. Rinsed, dried and olive oil rubbed. Seasoned outside and under the skin. This seasoning: http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/8287-turkey-and-chicken-seasoningrub/?p=82423 Indirect cook at 350 degrees with pecan and peach wood. The skin got dark because of the higher temps, the rub, and the fruit wood smoke but it was not burned. The wings did get a bit too toasty since I got busy and did not get to foil them. This bird was done in 2.5 hours I cooked the bird over a large drip pan and in the pan added low sodium chicken broth, water (to generously cover the pan bottom) quartered whole onion, stalk of celery, some red bell pepper and parsley. Into the drip pan goes the other miscellaneous turkey parts and the neck. Add water during the cook if needed to keep from drying the pan and burning. After removing the finished bird, I strained out the veggies, cooled the liquid and de-fatted the pan drippings,reducing over heat as needed and thickened with flour/corn starch slurry. Add the chopped giblets and the stripped meat off the neck -- a wonderful gravy. No need for any additional seasonings. Any dish requiring an oven was cooked on Big(Red)Joe. The inside oven was never turned on. The sequence was: turkey & roasted garlic (350 degrees), then the stuffing (350), and finally the rolls (375). Seasoned After Brining Peach and Pecan Wood in Ash Area Inside Lower Vent for Flavor – add as needed through lower vent (vent fully open for photo) Turkey Done Carved Breast Dark Meat Carved off Bone Kamado Roasted Garlic My Daughter’s Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes - how can you pass up potatoes with roasted garlic, butter, more butter and half-and half? My Wife’s Corn Bread Dressing Recipe (fixed by daughter) on Joe (homemade corn bread, toasted white bread, butter, onion, celery, garlic, parsley, chicken broth, some turkey pan drippings, sage, poultry seasoning, salt, cayenne pepper, Cajun seasoning) Crescent Rolls Giblet Gravy from the Drip Pan Goodness My Son’s Wok Cook Schezwan Green Beans Add Some Seasonal Decorations Pour the Wine Fill a Plate, Say the Grace, and Let’s Eat
  8. We went to my mom & dad's for Thanksgiving this year. I was asked to bring the turkey. At the last minute, my mom told me that she was making a "back-up" turkey. "You know, just in case the Egg'd turkey doesn't turn out..." Since there was going to be a traditional bird anyways, I decided to go non-traditional. I halved a 13# bird. One half is BBQ and the other half is buffalo. I made a compound butter for each using the rubs for each. The BBQ bird was injected with a butter mixture, discs of the compound butter under the skin and rubbed with a BBQ rub. The Buffalo bird was injected with a buffalo/butter mixture, discs of compound butter under the skin, rubbed with a spicy rub and basted with buffalo sauce towards the end of the cook. The poor back-up bird was never touched...
  9. With turkey day drawing near and threads popping up about our feathered friend.. Given the option of using only 1 method on a all natural bird, brine bath or an injection of your choice, what are you choosing to ensure a A+ product .
  10. Smoked Turkey Spring Rolls I happened across a recent episode before Thanksgiving on the Pioneer Woman show and she made spring rolls using Thanksgiving turkey leftovers, which I thought was a great idea since I do like spring rolls. Here is the result of my son and I working together. He did a majority of the prep and made the rolls, I think the boy might be relegating me to a sous chef role the more we cook together. But he ain’t out cooked ole dad yet. Close maybe. Some smoked leftover Kamado Joe Thanksgiving turkey was lightly marinated in soy, fish sauce, sesame oil, mirin, and Sriracha as a main ingredient. Also utilized cucumber, carrot, avocado, lettuce, red bell pepper, and fresh cilantro, plus rice noodles. I also made a spicy garlic peanut sauce and a dark sauce for dipping on the plate. Peanut Sauce - minced & mashed garlic/peanut butter/Hoisin sauce/lime juice/soy/sesame oil/ fish sauce/mirin/water/garlic chili paste/Sriracha – until it tasted right . Dark Sauce - soy/sesame oil/fish sauce/lime juice– until it tasted right. Here are some photos of the fixings and finished product.
  11. Hi Gurus! Yesterday was the BIG Thanksgiving Feast at my church. I volunteered to help cook some turkeys. In fact, I signed up to do 6, was told to expect to do more, but was only given 2 due to so many others wanting to cook the birds. OK, no big deal. I went out and bought a CyberQ WiFi unit to help with the cook seeing as I thought I had so many birds to cook. Well, the cook ended up being no big deal, but I think I screwed myself. More on that at the end. Early Saturday morning was cold and wet! I'm not a cold weather guy and I"m certainly never going to like being both cold and wet, so I was looking to spend as little time outside as possible. The CyberQ helped me stay dry and roast toasty. This WiFi feature is simply wonderful! Bluetooth has some inherent limitation that are easily overcome by WiFi. Here's a photo of the CyberQ all plugged in and ready to do its work in a hostile environment: Here's the PitViper fan ready to do it's thing in the rain: Neither until is waterproof so I had to figure something out. I Buddy of mine has drilled holes in Tupper Ware that he runs his cords through, but I didn't have that luxury. SOOOOO .... I made do. I had to anchor down the little storage bin covering the Cyber! unit with anything I could find ... these Oklahoma winds were nasty that day. The PitViper fan I covered with aluminum foil wrapped around the neck of the fitting that goes into The Beast. I secured it with a two twist ties tied together. Talk about Red-Neck engineering! But it worked and that's the important thing. Two 20# turkeys fit on the main grate with lots of room to spare: Now normally, I'd truss the legs and wings, but I was given strict instructions not to. The ladies who run this event told me not to put smoke on the bird, not to truss, no dressing, no oil on the skin for crispness, and cook until the pop-up thermometers popped up. I wasn't about to argue, so no smoke (except I did put on a little maple!), and I cooked the bird the bird until the pop-ups popped up. BTW - know what both pop-ups were set to? 175F! How do I know .... because the thermometers showed that temp on the CyberQ! In any event, here's a pic of the birds right after the CyberQ registered 155F, the temp I'd normally pull this cook. You can see the pop-ups on both birds in the back right hand quadrant: We did this cook at 350 and the CyberQ kept it nailed on that temp! Total time in the belly of TheBeast was 2:45: The finished birds ... notice the popped up thermometers ... 175F according to the CyberQ. I was instructed to cook until the pop-ups popped up and that's what this far rat did: Not too bad but could have been soon much better. BUT ... I'm not running that show, I just work here, drive a truck, and sweep the warehouse! Here the birds are foiled right before I took them to the church. Notice on the far right the bird tried to escape --- he didn't get far! To the church he went. The car smelled incredible for the trip! So all in all I'll give this cook a 3.5 Star Rating out of 5. Now for the I'm screwed part. I take those birds into the church kitchen and everyone starts oohing and aahing. How did you get that color on those birds. I said cooked 'em on my Komodo Kamado! The head of the Knights of Columbus perked up and came walking over to me and said, I never knew you had a kamado, like a BGE! I said, I have a kamado, but its MUCH better, IMNSHO, than the BGE. He said, so how come you're not signed up to cook for our brisket feed!? Now I've been a Knight for a LONG time and I never knew we had a brisket feed! The head Knight said, Well now you know and you just signed up! How big is your kamado? I told him it was large enough to fit 4 turkeys like the ones he was looking at. He said --- You're my new head bbq chef and walked away. We cook and sell over 75 briskets. I'm screwed! No good deed goes unpunished! I knew I should have listened to the Nuns!
  12. Fellow Akorn smokers: I am planning on smoking my first 13lb turkey this weekend. I have had many successful smokes on my Akorn (pork butt, ribs, brisket, etc.), but this is my first bird of this size. I used to partake in an annual "turkey smoke" about this time of year in the past and we went by the following. Mind you, we would also smoke about 20-25 birds at a time in a large smoke house. Birds in at 7:30 Fire starts at 8:00 175 degrees until noon. 1st baste. Increase temp to 225, baste on the hour until done, internal temp +/-160. Obviously, this is a colder smoke approach and the smoke house was set up for it. So, are the same results possible on the Akorn without a bunch of expensive attachments? Our typical smoke would be about 10-12 hours. Can the Akron maintain a 175 temp for 4 hours and then 225 for the last 6-8? Seems like that would be pushing it.
  13. I started dinner prepping on Wednesday morning by making up the brine. Here it is cooking. Basically this is Alton Brown’s Brine with a few tweaks. Ingredients: 1 gal. Vegetable stock. 1 cup salt ½ cup brown sugar 1 tbsp. Peppercorns 1 ½ tsp. allspice 1 ½ tsp. ginger 8 cloves 2 Bay leaves Peel from 1 orange Combine and then bring to a boil stirring occasionally. Then remove and cool to room temp and then chill in fridge. After it chilled I poured into a food safe 4 gal bucket. I then placed it into an ice chest surrounded by ice. I placed my cleaned turkey (without innards) into the brine solution. And place the lid on it and let it rest overnight. Now I load the kamado with charcoal & some Peach chunks and setup it up indirect cooking. Thursday Morning starts out with making up some seasoned butter rub. Ingredients: 1 ¼ sticks of butter 2 tbsp. Montreal Chicken seasoning ½ tsp. Sage powder ½ tsp. Rosemary flakes (Here’s a pic from last year) Also some aromatic items to place inside the bird. (Tweaked from last year) Ingredients: 1 Apple sliced into 1/8th’s ½ sliced onion 1 Cinnamon stick 4 sprigs of fresh Rosemary (from my garden) 6 sprigs of fresh Thyme (from my garden) 3 sprigs of fresh Sage (from my garden) 2 sprigs of fresh Oregano (from my garden) (Here’s a pic from last year) And finally make up some Cranberry, Apple & Walnut Dressing. Ingredients: 2 6 oz. Packages of Mrs. Cubbinson’s Seasoned Dressing mix 2 sticks of butter 1 cup of dried Cranberries 1 cup of finely chopped Walnuts 1 cup of minced Onion 1 cup of diced Celery 2 cups of diced Apple 1 ½ cups of Chicken stock ½ cup of Apple Cider Combine the Dressing, Cranberries, Apple & Walnuts in a large bowl. Melt the Butter in a large skillet and then add the Celery & Onion. Once this has wilted add the Chicken stock & Apple Cider and then turn the heat to low and let simmer of 10 minutes. Now add this wet mixture to the bowl and stir. Scoop this out into a dish and cover with aluminum foil. Bake for 45 minutes @ 350 degrees removing foil for the last 25 minutes. Now take the turkey out of the brine and place it on a prep tray. Create some pockets under the skin for the seasoned butter. (Here’s a pic from last year) Slide the seasoned butter in under the skin. (Here’s a pic from last year) Now in go the aromatics. (Here’s a pic from last year) Slather what’s left of the seasoned butter rub all over the bird. Light up the kamado and let it heat up to 250 and then put the turkey on. (This lets the bird absorb some smoke) Now ramp up the temp to 500 for 30 minutes. (To crisp up the skin) Then ramp down the temp to 325 to 350 to finish off the cook. (Mine took an additional 2 hours for the breast temp to reach 164) And this is what she looks like. My wife made up the table. Here are my plated shots. (My MIL - not wife) Here’s my “Money Shot” Below Aside from looking great this bird tasted ever better than last years which everyone thought couldn’t happen.. Everything was so moist with a nice smoky flavor to go along with the Sage / Rosemary / Montreal Seasoned butter. Everyone at the table said they wish they had a second stomach so they could eat more. I love smoked turkey.
  14. Cooked up our thanksgiving turkey on the Joe this weekend. Followed a combination of John Setzler's youtube turkey recipe and DerHusker's post on this site. Also borrowed the suggestion of placing an pan with chicken stock, onions, celery and carrots on the deflector to collect drippings to make gravy (with rolled tinfoil under the pan to create an air gap and prevent burning). When everything came off I strained the liquid from the pan and got a really nice gravy out of it. 15lb bird was ready in a little over 3 hours (a bit under 350 the whole time). Left the joe untouched from start to finish (no basting). I have to say it's been the best turkey I've ever cooked - I won't go back to the oven now. Everyone raved about the flavour and the meat was dripping with juice. Here's the only shot I took as I got too busy to wash up and shoot more. I used a tinfoil pan for the drippings - the roasting pan in the pic was just to catch extra drippings while I carried the bird inside. [Edit: fixed typo in John's last name]
  15. My wife made her wonderful stuffed peppers (utilizing ground turkey.) Roasted these indirect on the KJ...
  16. I purchased an extra turkey last Thanksgiving, and finally decided to get it out of the freezer. I didn't care to take too much time and effort with it, so I opted to do a sort of turbo turkey on the Akorn. It turned out really good, so I do recommend this. I asked my wife if she would make a turkey pot pie with the turkey, since chicken pot pie this is one of her "go to" dishes. I thought it would work well with this turkey, and be a good way to get rid of half of it. I forgot to see how big of a turkey this was, but it's probably about 10-12 lbs. It was pretty small. After making two pot pies, I still have a large breast left for sandwiches. I just used salt and pepper, since it was destined for pot pie. I put a pizza pan diffuser down, with foil over it. Then a drip pan in the middle. I put some foil on the grates to keep the wings and legs from burning. I saw a guy do that on Youtube. I fired up the grill and used my Maverick this time. Interestingly, I learned that the dome thermometer on the Acorn is off by approximately 130 degrees. It was reading about 320, and the Maverick said 450!!!! I got it down to about 417 - 435 for the cook. It took 2 hours almost to the minute to get the breast to 160 and the legs to about 173. I used the back bone and neck to make turkey stock for the pot pie recipe. Since it is such a good pot pie recipe, I will pin it below as well. http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chicken-Pot-Pie-IX/Detail.aspx?event8=1&prop24=SR_Title&e11=pot%20pie&e8=Quick%20Search&event10=1&e7=Recipe%20Hub&soid=sr_results_p1i1&rank=1
  17. I had a rain check for some .99 lbs. turkey breast so I bought a couple yesterday. I fired up the Akorn today and put butter all over it and covered it in Montreal Chicken. I also threw on some potatoes that would end up being mashed pototoes. Here is a plated shot of sliced turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, cornbread stuffing and escalloped corn.
  18. I've only done one other turkey breast on my Akorn, and it turned out great ( http://imgur.com/a/1FvRk ). This breast has been sitting in my freezer since so I figured let's do a little Thanksgiving... I'm collecting turkey juices for gravy in a foil pack of potatoes, carrots, onions, and garlic. I brined the bone-in breast in water, salt, poultry herbs, and adobo for about 5 hours. Then I dried it thoroughly and separated the skin from the meat. Under the skin I laid 4 strips of bacon. Sprayed with olive oil and sprinkled with more herbs, salt, pepper, then the whole shebang went on a rack over a drip tray and foil pack. Going about 350° for 2-3 hours with my Maverick in the turkey and Auber on the grill. Last time I did this the veg got pretty smoky, so I'm starting out with it completely foiled and then flipping it halfway through and slitting it to collect some juices. I'll be making a gravy from the drippings, along with stovetop stuffing, grilled asparagus (on the gasser... don't care for how they've turned out on the kamado in all honesty), and cranberry sauce. More pics to come...
  19. I searched the web for a good Turkey Noodle recipe but none were exactly what I was looking for so this is a combination of three different recipes I got off of YouTube. I start out by making some turkey stock. Here are most of the ingredients: 2 tbsp. of OO ½ large onion cut in 1/8th. 2 sprigs of Oregano (from my garden) 6 sprigs of Thyme (from my garden) 4 Bay leaves 2 carrots (chopped) 2 celery stalks (chopped) 1 tbsp. of pepper corns 2 tbsp. of salt Turkey carcass with wings, neck, heart & gizzards 8 cups of chicken stock 8 cups of cool water 2 tbsp. of catsup Put the OO in your stock pot and heat it up. Throw in all your dry ingredients and let them simmer for 5 minutes. Now put in the turkey and cover with the chicken stock & water and add the catsup. Bring to a rolling boil and then reduce the heat and let simmer for 2 ½ hours. Then turn off the heat and let cool. Now stain the liquid out and recover any usable meat to add later. Here is what it looks like after the 2 ½ hours. Now to make the soup. Here are the ingredients: 2 tbsp. of butter 1 large onion cut in ½ and each half in 1/8th. 3 cups carrots (chopped) 3 cups of celery (chopped) 1 tbsp. of ground pepper 1 tbsp. of ground sea salt 1 tsp. of dried Sage 1 tsp. of dried thyme 1 10.5 oz. can of Cream of Chicken soup 16 oz. package of noodles (I used egg noodles) 3 lbs of pulled and cut up turkey meat Melt the butter in your soup pot. Throw in all your veggies and let them simmer for 5 minutes. Now put in the turkey stock and spices and bring to a rolling boil and then reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes. Now bring the heat back up and bring to a rolling boil. Add the Cream of Chicken and stir and let cook for 3 minutes. Now add the noodles and let cook for 9 minutes. And now add the turkey meat. Stir and cook for another 5 minutes and you’re done. Money shot.
  20. I searched the web for a good Turkey Noodle recipe but none were exactly what I was looking for so this is a combination of three different recipes I got off of YouTube. I start out by making some turkey stock. Here are most of the ingredients: 2 tbsp. of OO ½ large onion cut in 1/8th. 2 sprigs of Oregano (from my garden) 6 sprigs of Thyme (from my garden) 4 Bay leaves 2 carrots (chopped) 2 celery stalks (chopped) 1 tbsp. of pepper corns 2 tbsp. of salt Turkey carcass with wings, neck, heart & gizzards 8 cups of chicken stock 8 cups of cool water 2 tbsp. of catsup Put the OO in your stock pot and heat it up. Throw in all your dry ingredients and let them simmer for 5 minutes. Now put in the turkey and cover with the chicken stock & water and add the catsup. Bring to a rolling boil and then reduce the heat and let simmer for 2 ½ hours. Then turn off the heat and let cool. Now stain the liquid out and recover any usable meat to add later. Here is what it looks like after the 2 ½ hours. Now to make the soup. Here are the ingredients: 2 tbsp. of butter 1 large onion cut in ½ and each half in 1/8th. 3 cups carrots (chopped) 3 cups of celery (chopped) 1 tbsp. of ground pepper 1 tbsp. of ground sea salt 1 tsp. of dried Sage 1 tsp. of dried thyme 1 10.5 oz. can of Cream of Chicken soup 16 oz. package of noodles (I used egg noodles) 3 lbs of pulled and cut up turkey meat Melt the butter in your soup pot. Throw in all your veggies and let them simmer for 5 minutes. Now put in the turkey stock and spices and bring to a rolling boil and then reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes. Now bring the heat back up and bring to a rolling boil. Add the Cream of Chicken and stir and let cook for 3 minutes. Now add the noodles and let cook for 9 minutes. And now add the turkey meat. Stir and cook for another 5 minutes and you’re done. Here it is in a bowl. Money shot.
  21. I’ve posted the recipe and cooking method already so most everyone knows the drill by now. Brine, Cook & Enjoy. Brine. Cook. Enjoy! Money Shot.
  22. Seasoning for Turkey or Chicken I developed this mix at Thanksgiving with the assistance of my wife and daughter in suggesting ingredients and tasting when I was playing around with different mixes. It has a very nice profile of flavors and is just a well-rounded poultry seasoning. The two brined turkeys cooked with this seasoning applied over an olive oil base were a hit with the extended family T-day crowd. 5 Tbps Badia Saison Completa (Badia Original Complete Seasoning) www.badiaspices.com or equivalent 2 Tbps Paprika 1 Tbps Chili Powder 3 tsp Garlic Powder 2 tsp Black Pepper 1 tsp Cumin 1 tsp Turmeric 1 tsp Poultry Seasoning 1 ½ tsp Sage 1 tsp Dried Thyme 1 tsp Dried Marjoram 2 tsp Dried Rosemary ½ tsp Salt (optional) This is sufficient for at least an 18 lb turkey with seasoning under skin and on outside of bird and in cavity. Enjoy….. PS - It also tastes really good as a coating on whole oil rubbed potatoes that are cooked on the smoker.
  23. I finally decided to try one of these board dressings that APL inspired. I made a turkey roast and was going to slice for sandwiches on hawaiin rolls with provalone and bacon. I made my board dressing with EVOO and oregano, rosemary , thyme and four seasons blend. The sandwiches are absolutly amazing and my wife said it was the best thing I have ever made on my Akorn. I didn't take a picture of the sandwiches but here is a picture of the sandwiches from a previous cook.
  24. ** video content removed ** This video fulfills my most requested topic in recent months... the smoked turkey! This was a very easy cook and the total cook time with the method I used was about 3 hours and 10 minutes. This might very well be the best turkey I have ever cooked. I'm a huge fan of deep fried turkeys but I'm seriously reconsidering that after this cook. Deep frying is fast but it's also expensive with the price of peanut oil.
  25. Since I purchased my Akorn,I have given my family plenty of samples of what it is capable of doing, So naturally, I have been nominated to cook the Turkey for Thanksgiving dinner. I have made plenty of whole chickens and turkey roasts but haven't attempted a full Turkey. So on Saturday I decided to do a small test cook. I got the Turkey for 89 cents a lb so I got a 15 lb turkey for right about 15 dollars with tax. This helped with the decision to test out the turkey. I thawed the turkey in the refrigerator per the instructions. On Saturday, I made a paste of butter and diced herbs (Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme) and coated the skin and under the skin with the paste. I then quartered 1 small onion, 1 apple, and 1 lemon. I put them in the bird cavity with the remainder of the herbs. I heated my grill up to 325 indirect and put the turkey on the grill. I only snapped 1 picture of it and it was right about the 3 hour mark. I took the bird off at breast temp of 168 and let rest for 20 minutes before carving. Great bird. Everyone thought it was delicious.
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