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Found 257 results

  1. New toy for Akorn pitmasters! I made a pellet grill conversion on my Akorn in June and now it's going into production. Basically I ripped out a pellet feeder from a small pellet grill and made an adapter at the bottom of the Akorn grill. I just got the patent pending status so I can post it now. Here is a write up on the project. I'll update when we got the production prototype made...probably within a month. https://bbqube.us/Turn-Your-Akorn-Kamado-into-a-Pellet-Grill-with-BBQube-Pellet-Conversion-Kit_b_15.html?draft=1
  2. 1 hour in to my first turkey on the Akorn. I let it smoke @ 250 then upped the temperature to 325 to cook and crisp. More updates to come.
  3. Prepped this little half butt for a work Halloween potluck last night, cooking it tonight. Just a little teaser before I tucked in and put it to bed.
  4. As the title suggests, I am looking for help getting my Akorn to act the way I want it to for smoking purposes. I have the smoking stone, use a water pan, and lower my dampers until it basically snuffs out my fire, but I cannot seem to keep my Akorn at 225. Now, I will admit that I am new to smoking and that there is a lot to be learned, but I have read tons of guides and watched videos and replicated them to my best ability, but still cannot get it to work for me. Currently, my process is this: Open dampers all the way Fill bottom of grill full of hardwood lump Light with cotton balls soaked in alcohol Toss in a couple chunks of hickory Place my smoking stone Place my water pan Close lid and let set until 150 Close dampers halfway until 180 Close dampers again halfway until 210 Close dampers halfway one last time to about .5 on top and bottom. 1 of 2 things happens here. Either the temp keeps building to nearly 300 or the fire dies. I play with the dampers making very small .5 adjustments to try and finagle it, but I cannot seem to get it right. When I do seem to get the temps in a semi stable range around 230-260 (after LOTS of adjustments), after about an hour I go to spritz my meat with some apple juice and the temps take off again (Obviously because I just fed it a lot of oxygen) and never seem to come back down. I have read about this "volcano" method of lighting the coals, but I literally have not found any videos or pictures on how to set that up. Basically, I have no idea what I am doing wrong and I could use someone being critical of my process to give me some advice and direction. Thanks for any feedback!
  5. Here's my entry for October's PP challenge. This is actually a double leftover. I made sloppy joes using leftover pork smoked in my Akorn. Since that's basically a pp sandwich that will not be my submission. I decided a pp omelette was the ticket with a Carolina twist BBQ sauce and coleslaw. It was scrumptious. Chopped Onions, red peppers, green peppers, yellow peppers and a 3 cheese blend rounded out the rest of the ingredients.
  6. My sister gifted our mom and me a steak dinner for our birthdays this month. Meaning she bought the steaks and I cooked them. I used a mix of seasoning salts, Lawry's, garlic salt, and something else my dad had in the cabinet to season them. I wish I could have really let the seasoning salts do their job for awhile, but basically just let them come up to room temperature since they were purchased today and we were eating them tonight. I low and slowed them on my Akorn for about an hour @250ish using my BBQube and Bluetooth temp monitor to get them to about 115-120 internal. I then transferred them to some cast iron skillets with melted butter in them I had heated to 450-500 on my dad's gas burner and seared them for 1 minute per side. Overall fantastic results. I wanted a good medium/medium-rare for mine and I think I got it dead on. Money shots provided.
  7. Hi all, I was in love with my Akorn rotisserie setup but bored with birds, I decided to put some SLC ribs on a rotisserie setup. Ribs came from Costco pre-dry rub. Had three chunks of Kiawe wood on top of a snake of charcoals. No drip pan but the fire is on the side. Grill was around 350-400 degrees most of time and only took two hours for the ribs to be done. The rotisserie eliminated the under/over cooked spots and from now on I'll always do ribs on a rotisserie! Check out the video I made and enjoy the weekend
  8. I just completed my weekly maintenance of my Akorn, and my thermometer (on the pit) was off by some 215 degrees... sheesh.. Can these be calibrated? Now that I think of it.. I think it's been off big time since I had it.... Any ideas?
  9. My old Char Broil propane burner was finished after 4 years of noble if uninspired service, good for steaks, chops, and chicken. I decided to try the Kamado life based on recommendations. The ceramics are a dream and maybe one day I'll cave and eat my shirt for an Egg or a Joe, but to get started I needed to jump in cheap. I was looking at getting an Akorn, I have a buddy who has one and it does a good job for roughly 1/3rd to 1/4th the cost. I went even cheaper to CraigsList. $130 later I had a used, but in decent shape CharGriller KingGriller Akorn. Originally he wanted $150 for it, but the back leg came off rolling it to the truck. I figured it was fixable and was still going to buy it when he kicked me back a $20 for my troubles. He also threw in some gallon ziplocs with briquettes and lump and pretty much full bag of Kamado Joe BB XL. He was getting rid of it since he bought a Traeger. 2 of the 3 rivnuts ripped out, I was able to hammer one back in and it tightened up, but the bottom one wasn't having it. I probably should have gone and bought some rivnuts and a gun and fixed it that way, but my dad figured a good stainless bolt through the lower body would do. I figured it wouldn't hurt too much as long as we didn't over tighten the bolt and pinch the body, threw on a couple of washers on for good measure. I bought some red RTV with plans to pop the bolt back off and seal it up a little, but it hasn't seemed necessary since I haven't had control issues. I did add some gasket to the ash pan and body to help with some smoke leaks, but I doubt that was really necessary since it never got out of control and I could still kill the fire. I have been doing tons of research and watching youtube videos since buying the Akorn. I do recommend those fan temperature control adapters and bluetooth thermometers. Again I'm cheap and wasn't about to spend more than I paid for the grill for one, so I got lucky and found a gently used BBQube on eBay for $50. I had previously purchased a bluetooth thermometer on Amazon as well. The BBQube is supposed to be a jack of all trades temp control/bluetooth thermometer device, but the bluetooth on mine at least isn't ideal(they have a firmware update I want to try). The range isn't as good as my thermometer and it disconnected more than I would care for otherwise a worthwhile purchase and I recommend it or something like it (might have been caused by weather it got a little stormy both grill and controller were under a patio though and didn't get a drop of water on them). When no one messed with my grill over an 18 hour cook it never went more than 25 degrees in either direction of my set temp 225. Usually it would warm to 230s/240s then slowly go back down I don't think it ever dropped below 220 as long as the grill stayed closed. Links to both devices below they also have apps for whatever platform phone you have. We threw some hot dogs on for dinner since I had already fired it up instead of using the gas grill this caused my temp to drop to 180 and spike to 260 since the controller didn't know I was opening it and started blowing at 100% speed. Found out later you can pause it when you open the grill and resume once you've closed it back and let the temp come back up. I've found it isn't hard to maintain temps on the Akorn, you just have to occasionally go fiddle with the vents. A smidge open , a smidge closed every so often just to keep it in that Goldilocks zone isn't terrible. With a controller I went to sleep with the alarms set on my temp probe apps and they never once went off and woke me up all night. Got up the next morning with a pork butt at 200 degrees tender and juicy. Other notable purchases: High heat grill/welding gloves (burned off too many arm hairs flipping steaks) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077M3Z8BM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 BBQube Temp Controller (I didn't pay that much, but I can see why you would, there are a few slightly cheaper options out there, but your trade off is features) https://www.amazon.com/BBQube-BBQ-QUBE-WEBKT-TempMaster-Temperature-Controller/dp/B07CZ3LHQR/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=bbqube&qid=1569437795&s=gateway&sr=8-1 Bluetooth Thermometer (2 probes and really good range can't complain for the price) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PYVLBSM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Rib Rack https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01AEGOQ9A/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Gasket Material https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015DAI8K0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Grate Lifter(Don't know what happened to the one that came with the grill didn't think to ask when I bought it) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RL5HD6K/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 All in I think I'm still under the cost of a brand new Akorn much less an Egg or a Joe.
  10. Finally I got around to finish this idea I had for a long time, ever since I made the pizza ring. I picked up a set of Weber Rotisserie and lathed part of the shaft round to fit the Akorn. I cut two little "V" on the pizza ring and the drive motor sits perfectly on top fo the side table - lucked out on that one! The chickens were marinaded with Hawaiian Huli Huli Sauce for two days, with some Hawaiian Salt Seasoning, freshly ground pepper and they turned out amazing. I gotta thank my neighbor who worked at a construction site and got me a tuck load of dried out Kiawe wood. It burns really hot and long lasting. I'm starting to put a kit together and will report back on the progress.
  11. This post will contain links to commonly used modifications and fixes for the Char-Griller Akorn Kamado Kooker Grill & Smoker. If you think a thread should be included on this list, please let me know... Charcoal Grate, Split Diffuser, & Searing Basket High Heat Searing Basket Video Rain Hat for the Akorn Sealing Air Leaks w/BGE Gasket Material Needed: Additional pictorial demonstration of sealing the air vent / ash pan
  12. I dug up my old files today and found this hitch rack I designed and built back in 2015. I couldn't find the installed pic but I was hauling my akorn around with it. Never made it to production but if there is enough interests here I may make a few sets. I'll tell you there will be a lot of compliments at traffic stops haha. The floor jack will be replaced with a standalone hand truck that can be used as a floor stand when the grill is off the truck.
  13. My wifed signed me up for BBQ Ribs at my son's baseball endgame party. After working on my own controller like nuts for 3 years she now signs me up for every potluck party we go. So I was on a quest to find out how to use minimum effort to make pro-like ribs. I figured I'll make a video for it since I haven't smoked much of ribs for a while. Here is a process I tested today and the ribs turned out to be just as savory and tasty as, well, finely prepped ribs. It'd add a few points with some freshly cut herbs and garlic but these ribs turned out to be just amazing. Here is the process, no overnight seasoning, no wrapping and no mopping. The grill was not touched til the end. 1. I went straight to Costco and picked up some pre-dry-rubbed St. Louis Cut Ribs. I've used them before and they are great. For only $3.49 /lb and seasoned, this is the best bang for the buck. This way I don't have to buy them ahead of time. The ribs are good to go. The rub was called "Souvloki" rub and it got a little heat in it. 2. I curled up the ribs into a standing tube with two skews. This way the ribs are cooked 1~2 hours faster and even on both sides. It took three hours to cook the ribs to 210 internally. 3. Lit the starter cube, put in the heat deflector, insert the meat probes and grill probe. Put the meat in and close the lid for the first and last time. 4. Set the temperature controller to 270. I was just experimenting with it, It worked really well. A nice bark was formed yet the inside is savory. It pulls off the bone easily. 5. That was it. No wrapping no mopping no nothing. Just cruise around for 3 hours and take it straight out of the grill and eat. So next time if you are in a hurry or just being lazy...you know what to do.
  14. This will be my first chuck roast cook on the Akorn. I’ve only cooked steaks and wings on the grill so far, so this will be a learning experience for sure. Any advice or tips are welcome.
  15. Hi all, we made a little video about cooking frozen pizza from stores. It was a fun lunch at work. When I first made the pizza ring 2 years ago there weren't many frozen pizzas in the stores, most are thick crust. but now...wow, they got their own aisle. So we dust off the pizza ring and made pizza lunch at work. We tested more than 8 different brands of pizzas, and Newman's thin crust cooked best in the Akorn Kamado, California kitchen's Sicily pizza had a perfect dough/topping ratio, and even the cauliflower dough tasted good from the stone. The stone was kept around 450 - 500, anything higher may burn the dough without full cook the toppings. So on thicker dough keep the stone under 400 will be a good idea. Talking bout the stone, we used Rockheat we bought from Amazon, I'd recommend it. simple but smart handle design. We're working on a pizza stone with a digital thermometer built in, then you won't need the Infrared gun to read the stone temperature. I can probably program our controller to keep the stone temperature consistent. https://bbqube.us/Turn-Your-Akorn-Kamado-into-an-Italian-Pizza-Oven-with-Kamado-Pizza-Ring_b_2.html
  16. First cook with the Tip Top Temp on my Akorn Kamado. Smoked a pork loin to perfection this morning. Have a pork butt on now (less the apple wood chunks) In prior cooks on both a vertical smoker and on the kamado, temp would sour when the wood chunks for smoking would catch. Now with the Tip Top Temp, it closes the damper until the temporary spike subsides, then opens back up to maintain constant temp. Before the Tip Top Temp those adjustments were manual and much more tedious!
  17. Grill = Akorn. Temp control by TipTopTemp. No leaks. Probes = Thermoworks Smoke and Thermopen MK4. I've confirmed that the probes are accurate, and there was no obstructions on the pit probe. Put on a 16lb Packer (probably a few pounds less after trimming) at midnight. According to the Smoke's graphs, the pit temp held between 215-235 all night. The brisket hit the stall after only 3 hours of cooking, so IT of 160 by 3AM. When I woke up to make some pit adjustments (it jumped to around 250 at 6AM, probably when the sun came up and the TTT compensated for change in ambient temp) the meat was already at around 180, so I'm wrapping in butcher paper, however it's going to be finished - including resting - in under 12 hours, which just doesn't seem right. Had I wrapped when the stall hit, that would have been at 3AM, and maybe it would have been done around 8. How is that even possible for a 16lb packer? Everything was timed so that it would be done (including rest) in around 16 hours, though obviously every piece of meat is different. I would not have expected a piece to be THIS different though.
  18. Assembly of the akorn jr was easy. Especially with help from my 9 month old son lol First cook on the acorn jr. Two cornish hens. I rubbed them with olive oil and cowboy rub. When they were almost finished I put a little homemade bbq sauce a friend gave me on them. They were very good. Fell off the bone. I let the grill get too hot at first, but I brought it back down to between 300-325 and watched it until it got to 165 on the probes. I do not trust the akorn jr temp gage at all. My probes were saying it was 75-100 degrees hotter than the gauge on the dome. I used the bbqube for indirect cooking. I think it was a great investment. I plan on using a pie pan or something to put liquid under my meat sometimes.
  19. So my daughter is getting married tomorrow. A smaller wedding (98 guests) taking place at his family farm. The groom and his brother own a distillery business on the farm and the wedding will be held outside between the home and the business. The meal will be catered and the boys wil have the wood fired oven going for late night pizzas. Think they can do four or five at a shot. At the last minute she has asked me to provide a 60-70ish pulled pork sliders. So I snuck out of work early today, managed to find five nice pork shoulder “partial bone-in roasts” totalling about 10kg (22 lbs), raced home, rubbed them up, injected with apple juice and loaded up the Akorn. Going to finish them tonight, pulled and pack the meat and get into bed. Tomorrow I need to pick up the slider buns that I ordered, slice the tomatoes and onions, prepare some sauce and away we go! Meat will be rehated in the pizza oven prior to serving. i had done three 8 pound butts before and they were actually a better fit than these five smaller roasts. More photos to follow. Wish me luck!
  20. I recently added a BBQ Guru PartyQ fan to my Akorn to get my temperature issues under control. I've made bone-in, skin-on Chicken Thighs twice now but they taste way too smoky and bitter. I'm using lump charcoal, put a weber fire starter near the top of the heap and let it flame for a bit, then shut the lid, crack the top vent and set the PartyQ for 350. Once at temp, the thighs go on for about an hour. Am I lighting it correctly, should I use a different temp?. I'm all for a bit of smoke taste but these have way too much
  21. Before I bought my Akorn I read as much as I could about this grill. I found quite a bit of information here on this forum, and it convinced me to buy the Akorn (and a spare!), and start experimenting away. Here is my take on the Akorn after owning it for a year as of this weekend. I'll stick to three basic areas: efficiency, versatility, and durability. First some details. I picked up this Akorn for $250 at Walmart last Spring. (It still had a clearance price tag on it from the previous fall/winter.) In the last year I have lit the grill 120 times and burned through about six bags of 18lb (17.63lb actually) Royal Oak lump charcoal. I haven't done any low and slow yet, but I have tried lots of different cooks at varying temps. If I had to describe an average cook, it would be at about 400F for around 1 hour. I live in Massachusetts and keep my Akorn stored on a covered porch. I don't have a cover for the Akorn, but it rarely gets wet where it is located. I store it with all vents closed and keep whatever charcoal is left form the last burn sitting in the fire bowl. The ash bin only gets emptied out after each complete bag of lump is burned. (More on that below.) Efficiency: One of the great aspects of this grill is its efficiency! I am averaging about 20-22 cooks per bag of charcoal. The grill comes to 400F in about 15 minutes, and the fire is out almost immediately after shutting down the vents. Even after it has been in operation for an hour, you can still touch the outside of the dome without melting the flesh off your hand! There are two warnings to consider, both based on this high efficiency. First, it is difficult to lower temps if you overshoot your target. Second, it takes about 15 minutes with vents wide open to reach 400. If you leave them open for another 5-10, you will have pinned your dome thermometer at beyond 700F! Id doesn't take long for this thing to go "nuclear"! Versatility: I have been amazed at the variety of foods I am able to cook on this thing! Here's a few pics to illustrate: Of course you have to try pizza when you have a kamado! I tried scorching hot in the beginning, but found that around 550 gives a nice balance of crispy crust and cooked toppings. Paella is one of my favorite things to cook when I have friends over. This 15" pan fits in the Akorn and allows the lid to be lowered while cooking. This cast iron wok sits on the lower grate, and hits temps of 650-700F quite easily. At those temps, veggies sear rather than steam and you get that smoky taste on food similar to what you'll get in a Chinese restaurant. For lower temp cooks like fried rice, I place the wok on the top grate. Cast iron pans offer a lot of options when grilling. I love apple pie or blueberry cobbler on the Akorn, and people are always shocked to see me pull one off the grill! I picked up a Kettle-Q to do some outdoor griddle cooking with. So far I've just been experimenting, but I can say I love the fact that the house doesn't smell all breakfasty for a week! And then there is just some great comfort food! Throw some chili in a cast iron skillet, toast up some buns and cook some hot dogs, assemble and cook up on the upper rack, and enjoy some awesome chili dogs! Durability: It seems like every review of the Akorn questions its durability. Here are some pics showing what mine looks like after the year and 6 bags of charcoal: As mentioned above, I leave the entire bag's worth of ash in the ash bin. As shown in this pic, even that amount of ash does not interfere with the air flow from the bottom vent. After emptying the ash in the picture above, I gave the bin a decent cleaning, and found that after a year it is still shining! It's pretty amazing that the original enamel is all still intact, and there are no areas showing a break in the finish. For the record, I removed 2 quarts of ashes from the bin. Here's the fire bowl removed for inspection. The exterior still retains its original finish. Fire bowl installed in Akorn. There is discoloration where the fire burns hottest, but no evidence of rust. The charcoal grate has deformed approximately 3/4" in the center from the heat. I hand't even noticed until I took the grill apart to clean it. Akorn interior with fire bowl removed. There is a shallow lip on the flat surface that the ash bin sits against. (This is not visible with the fire bowl installed.) If water gets into an Akorn I can imagine it could sit on this rim, causing some of the rust issues others have encountered. I love the cast iron grate! With minimal care it has served me well. Just watch out for high temp cooks such as pizza, because they can cook away the seasoning on the grate. The only obvious area of finish wear appears on the lower shelf. There are several dime-sized areas of corrosion on one side. In terms of durability, this Akorn is going strong! If I decide to eventually replace the charcoal grate and lower shelf, the parts only cost $10 and $25 respectively through Char Griller. For $250 I am very happy with the purchase. I was even happier to find a spare for $125 during last fall's clearance sale!
  22. Hi all, I just wanted to show off the pizza ring I made for my Akorn kamado. I was posting it in the grill board but I saw this board I figured you guys gonna dig it. I may do more w/ other grills if demand is high. I had my in-house engineer digitized the whole grill so we can laser cut the sheet metal with high precision and will fit tight. I've made dozens of tortilla pizza in it, I've had it heated up to over 800 degrees. Works like a champ.
  23. I've had my Akorn for almost three years now, and thought I'd give quick review as to how it's holding up. First some details. I picked up this Akorn for $250 at Walmart in March of '15. (It still had a clearance price tag on it from the previous fall/winter.) In the last three years I have lit the grill 227 times. If I had to describe an average cook, it would be at about 400F for around 1 hour. During the first year I kept close track of charcoal consumption, and I was averaging 20-23 burns per bag of Royal Oak lump. That is efficient! I live in Massachusetts and keep my Akorn stored on a covered porch. I don't have a cover for the Akorn, but it rarely gets wet where it is located. I store it with all vents closed and keep whatever charcoal is left from the last burn sitting in the fire bowl. The ash bin only gets emptied out after each complete bag of lump is burned. Durability: It seems like every review of the Akorn questions its durability. Here are some pics showing what mine looks like after two years and almost 230 burns: The only damage I've had to worry about was caused by me. Lesson learned: never tilt the Akorn to remove winter slush from the bottom tray because it just might get away from you and slam into the deck! The result was two riv-nuts for the hinge pulled out from the body. Luckily it was an easy fix with a cheap tool from Harbor Freight. (I posted a step by step a while back for others who may need to replace the riv-nuts.) The enamel in the ash pan is still shining after holding the remnants of 10-12 bags of lump! There is just a hint of surface rust showing where the inner and outer shells are riveted together. The fire bowl has most of its original enamel intact. There is a little rippling toward the bottom where the fire burns hottest, and light rust is visible where the standoffs are welded to the bowl. This is the interior of the Akorn with the fire bowl removed and ash pan installed. That lighter colored ring is where Akorns tend to rust out. So far no rust to be concerned about. The fire grate has been warped sine I gave the Akorn its first really thorough cleaning two years ago. It hasn't changed much since then, so I don't plan to replace it. Water really is the enemy of this grill! Mine is holding up great with no rusted parts or areas of concern. I have two friends, however, who both have Akorns purchased about the same time as mine who are not so lucky. In both cases, the grills spend much of their time exposed to the weather. Even though covers are used, both are showing rust at the connection between ash pan and body of the Akorn.
  24. I've had my Akorn for almost two years now, and thought I'd give quick review as to how it's holding up. First some details. I picked up this Akorn for $250 at Walmart in Spring of '15. (It still had a clearance price tag on it from the previous fall/winter.) In the last two years I have lit the grill 186 times. haven't done any low and slow yet, but I have tried lots of different cooks at varying temps. If I had to describe an average cook, it would be at about 400F for around 1 hour. When I keeping close track of charcoal consumption I was averaging 20-23 burns per bag of Royal Oak lump. That is efficient! I live in Massachusetts and keep my Akorn stored on a covered porch. I don't have a cover for the Akorn, but it rarely gets wet where it is located. I store it with all vents closed and keep whatever charcoal is left from the last burn sitting in the fire bowl. The ash bin only gets emptied out after each complete bag of lump is burned. Worthwhile Additions: Here are four accessories that extend what I am able to cook on the Akorn. Paella Pan - This 15" paella pan fits inside the Akorn and allows the lid to close completely. Making paella from scratch is about a 90 minute project, but it's a lot of fun to hang out with friends while cooking it! Cast Iron Pans - I have various sizes that get used regularly. Pies, pot pies, and cobblers all come out great in the pan shown above, while I use slightly smaller ones to grill up peppers and onions while chicken or steak is cooking. Cast Iron Griddle - This Lodge is reversible and can easily accommodate four smash burgers at a time. The accessory rack can also be installed while the griddle is in place so buns can be toasted. Cast Iron Wok - This Mr. BBQ Cast Iron Wok is great for putting a serious sear on vegies! On the bottom rack it's easy to hit temps of 650-700F, which causes vegetables to sear rather than steaming. The result is food that tastes like it comes from a Chinese restaurant. Durability: It seems like every review of the Akorn questions its durability. Here are some pics showing what mine looks like after two years and almost 200 burns: Yup, that's an ash pan with shining enamel after two years of solid use! The original finish is completely intact. The fire bowl has most of its original enamel intact. There is a little rippling toward the bottom where the fire burns hottest, and light rust is visible where the standoffs are welded to the bowl. This is the interior of the Akorn with the fire bowl removed and ash pan installed. That lighter colored ring is where Akorns tend to rust out. If water gets in that small lip will keep it sitting there. The only actual signs of corrosion are found on the bottom tray. (Rain and snow sometimes does accumulate there.) In terms of durability, this Akorn is going strong! The only part that I may replace in the next year is the charcoal grate which has warped due to heat. (It hasn't changed much since I noticed the warping last year.) Other than that, the Akorn is holding up great!
  25. Anyone have a problem after lightning for the first time where the seal is leaking on the lid? Smoke coming out the side.
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