Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'beef'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Introductions
    • Introductions
  • Kamado Cooking Challenges
    • Kamado Challenges
    • Member Kamado Challenges
  • Announcements and Information
    • Announcements / Site Suggestion
  • General Discussion
    • Kamado Cooking and Discussion
    • Accessories & Product Reviews
    • The Cooler
    • Sales, Bargains, and Giveaways
    • Guru Classifieds
    • Charcuterie
    • Dry Aging
    • Kamado Pizza and Baking
    • Sous Vide Cooking
    • Indoor and Non-Grill Cooking
    • Do-It-Yourself
    • Healthy Lifestyles
  • Talk About Your Cooker
    • Char-Griller AKORN Kamado / King Griller
    • Vision Kamado
    • Kamado Joe
    • Big Green Egg
    • Primo Grills
    • Komodo Kamado
    • Grill Dome
    • Blaze Kamado
    • Pit Boss Kamados
    • Gourmet Guru Grill
    • Big Steel Keg / Bubba Keg
    • Saffire Grills
    • Bayou Classic Cypress Grill
    • Other Kamados
    • Non Kamado Cookers
  • Recipes
    • Beef Recipes
    • Pork Recipes
    • Charcuterie Recipes
    • Poultry Recipes
    • Pizza and Pasta
    • Chili / Soups / Stews
    • Other Meat Recipes
    • Seafood Recipes
    • Rubs / Marinades / Brines / Mops / Sauces
    • Side Dishes / Veggies
    • Snacks / Hors d'oeuvres
    • Desserts
    • Artisan Breads
    • Other Recipes
  • Pellet Grill Enthusiasts's Topics

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location:


Interests

Found 94 results

  1. elbatiger

    Help

    Ok folks I'm up against the wall. Tomorrow is our family reunion I had planned to cook - smoke two tri-tips, my butcher let me down... so I guess it will be pork again this year and be up half the night. Anyone have suggestions for beef that is comparable to tri-tip in tast, tenderness and time? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Ronny
  2. Spent some time yesterday with just the wife and I making some beef ribs on out stickburner, first time in forever that we have not had to cook for an event, so it was nice to just be able to have some hot dogs for appetizer while waiting on these beef ribs. Hope everyone’s Sunday is enjoyable and relaxing enjoy 572E25BB-1878-40D9-8700-82BD2C854DE1.MOV
  3. So, what is it about men that makes them reluctant to RSVP? Cooking for my brothers and nephews this Saturday to make up for all the birthdays I missed, so I picked supplies today. 10 pounds of beef plate ribs and 10 pounds of Spares that I am cutting into St. Louis'.
  4. Here's a recipe for some big bold beef chuck rubs with a big bold homemade rub to bring it to life! 2 to 4 Beef Chuck Short ribs, separated or on a full rack Rub: 3 tablespoons sea salt or kosher salt 3 tablespoons fresh ground black pepper 1 tablespoon onion powder 1 tablespoon fresh ground coffee 1 teaspoon granulated garlic or garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper Worcestershire sauce to coat ribs Preheat your Kamado Joe to 250°F and setup for indirect cooking. Add a couple smoke wood chunks of your choice and cook these until they are probe tender (approximately 200°F internal meat temperature.)
  5. Hopefully life will start settling back down soon so I can get back on here and start cooking more often! I decided I needed to at least get back into the swing of the monthly competitions just to get the muscles flexed again. As this month's challenge is Salad for Dinner, so I had to give it a crack. With me working in Atlanta, I've fallen in love with Korean and Asian food in general. One of my favorite new flavors is Bulgogi! If you've never had anything marinated or glazed with a Bulgogi marinade or sauce, you don't know what you are missing. For those that don't know, Bulgogi is a sweet and tangy sauce mainly flavored with pear juice. It works with any meat, but I favor it with any cut of beef you can find. I'm believe it would even make shoe leather quite palatable! Sadly, in my rush to get this done by tonight's deadline, I didn't take many photos of the process, not that there are a lot of steps to this one. First, I marinated the steak overnight with a bottled bulgogi marinade, and threw in a little fresh garlic and ginger to punch up the flavor a bit more. All I had in the fridge was a london broil, so that got the overnight bulgogi bath. Next it went on to a ripping hot grill to get some of that great grill flavor. After a few minutes on each side, she was ready to take off the grill. While that was grilling, we cut up the lettuce, cucumbers, bell peppers and made up some homemade Asian ginger dressing. During that time, I also reduced the bulgogi marinade into a nice thick glaze by adding a bit of honey and cooking it down. Doesn't it look amazing?!? In the rush to get this into my pie hole, I forgot to get pics of the sliced meat, oh well. Anyways, here is the final product! Again, I highly suggest if you've not yet tried bulgogi, give it a shot. It's great as a dip with asian foods as well.
  6. bbqboss84601

    Sous Vide Prime Rib

    This was 12 hour prime rib Sous Vide seasoned with prime rib rub from traeger with added garlic and added rosemary. Seared on the KJ Junior at nuclear, these are the results. Thanks
  7. Most of you who’ve been around a few years know this is the time of year that I go Full Griswald so I haven’t got a lot of cooking in recently. Well I was finally able to get in a cook this weekend. Every year I host our family Christmas get together. My 2 brothers that live out here in California, come down from the L.A. area with my niece and nephew. We like to vary the meal menu each year. One year we will cook Tamales, (A So. Cal. Christmas staple) the next we’ll do Turkey, then a nice Honey Baked Ham. Well last year we decided to try a Ribeye Roast and it was a big hit so we did it again this year. My preparations started the night before when I made up some Horseradish Sauce. (This pic is from last year but it’s the same as what I did this year) Horseradish Sauce Recipe: (Tweaked from Chef John on Food Wishes) 1/2 cup sour cream or crème fraiche 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice pinch of cayenne 2 teaspoon thinly sliced chives. (I like to use Dill) 2 tablespoons extra hot (Atomic) pure horseradish (not horseradish sauce) I had this nice boneless Ribeye Roast in my freezer that I started thawing last Tuesday. Early Sunday I made up a Rosemary and Garlic rub / paste to use on it. Rub Recipe: (From Larry of BEER-N-BBQ by Larry) 1/2 cup chopped fresh rosemary 3+ Tbsp crushed garlic 2 Tbsp salt 1 Tbsp black pepper OO I unwrapped the roast and trimmed off most of the hard fat. I applied the rub (paste) and then covered it with plastic wrap and let it sit on the counter for the next 4 hours to come up to room temperature. Around noon I set up my kamado for direct / indirect cooking. I let it come up to 250 degrees before I put on the roast. While it was cooking we set the table from our guests. After it reached an internal temperature of 124 degrees I pulled it off and covered it while the kamado got up to searing temps. (Note: many of my guests wanted it well done so the best I could talk them into was cooking to medium) Once the CI grate was nice and hot I put on the roast for 1 minute per side. Here are some pics of me slicing it. On the table on the Christmas platter. And here it is plated with a Stone Brewing “Pataskala Red X IPA” on the side. Both are waiting to be devoured. Even though this was cooked to mostly medium it was still delicious. The rub / paste developed into a nice crust that was absolutely delicious. Thanks for looking.
  8. I went to the store hoping to do a Tritip there were none to be had. Found this ribeye I think It will do the job. Reverse seared at 250* until internal reached 118* then took it off to season while the Primo climbed too 500* for the sear.
  9. We went to some friend’s house for Thanksgiving dinner so I didn’t cook anything until Saturday when I broke out this Tri-Tip from the freezer. I trimmed it up a little and rubbed it down with fresh ground pink salt, fresh ground black pepper, some steak seasoning and fresh minced Rosemary. I wrapped it up and let it rest for 6 hours while I continued to put up my Christmas lights. Once I was done I set up my kamado for indirect and direct cooking. I placed the TT on the indirect side. Once the IT got to 113 degrees I removed it and covered with foil. I opened up the vent and let the kamado up to searing temps. I put the TT on and let it sear for 3 minutes per side. Here’s the first side with the flash. And with-out the flash And now turned. After that I brought it inside and let it rest for 10 minutes. After it had rested I sliced it in half where the grain changes. Close-up. Started slicing it and here’s the money shot! We served it with a baked potato and green beans. Delicious!
  10. CentralTexBBQ

    Feeding My Addiction

    well, visually at least- precursor to preivously posted Barbecue- The Movie interesting book on churrasco style bbq still determined to take a class on this
  11. Ingredients: Meat: 3 to 4 lbs. of good quality Chuck Roast Hot sauce (I used Tapatio) Steak Seasoning (I used Kirkland) Ground coriander Ground chipotle pepper Veggies & Broth: Two green bell peppers (Chopped) One red bell peppers (Chopped) One yellow bell peppers (Chopped) 1 large red onion (Chopped) 1 large brown or yellow onion (Chopped) 1 large jalapeño (Diced) 1/4 cup of Worcestershire sauce 12 oz. of Guinness Extra Stout (or any good dark beer) Directions: Take meat and Sprinkle with hot sauce and rubbed down for even coverage. Now rub with steak seasoning, ground coriander and chipotle pepper for even coverage and to taste. Wrap up in plastic wrap and let rest in the fridge a minimum of 4 hours. (8 is better) Once rested, set up your kamado for indirect cooking and preheat to 250. Add a chunk of your favorite smoke wood and place meat on grill. Let it cook until the I.T. is 165 degrees. While the meat is cooking, cut up your veggies and place them in an aluminum chafing pan. Pour the Worcestershire sauce and the beer over the veggies. (You can add more chipotle powder to the veggies if you like) Once the meat I.T. has reached 165, remove it from the grill and place it in the pan on top of the veggies and tightly cover with aluminum foil. Return the chafing pan to your kamado and bump up the temperature to 325 to 350. Cook this until the meat I.T. has reached 210 degrees. Now remove the chafing pan from the kamado and remove the foil. Do a loose pull of the meat being very careful not to splash the hot liquid on yourself. Once you’re done pulling return the chafing pan to the kamado to reduce the liquid to your desired level. (I like mine fairly thick) Once the liquid reaches your desired level remove it from the kamado. Pull any larger pieces of meat to your desired size and it’s ready to use. (Step by step pictures of this process are below) I originally posted this cook as Chucky’s Nightmare. I have decided to post it as a recipe as well. I got the inspiration for this from “The Wolfe Pit” but since I wanted mine for Tacos I switched up a few ingredients. Start with a good Chuck Roast. Here are the rub ingredients. (Note: I would’ve used Cummin but I was out so I used Coriander instead. It turned out so good I’m not sure if I’ll change it.) My Chuck Roast was huge (6.3 lbs.) so I cut it in half. Rubbed it down with some hot sauce. Now with the steak seasoning, ground coriander and ground chipotle chili pepper. (I just eyeballed it) Wrap this up and rest a minimum of 4 hours. (Overnight would be better) Light up the kamado. Throw on the chuck once it reaches temperature (250) with some wood chunks. (I used Mesquite) Here are veggies to I used. Once I had chopped up the veggies I sprinkled on 1 tsp. of ground chipotle chili pepper. Then I poured in 1/4 cup of Worcestershire Sauce and 1 Stockyard Oatmeal Stout. (Guinness is used a lot but any dark beer will do) After the chuck roast had reached and internal temperature of 165 I placed it on the bed of veggies. I then covered the pan with foil and placed it back on the kamado along with some appetizers. I cranked up the temp to 325 and let it cook for another 2 hours. After 2 hours the IT was 209 so I removed the foil. And pulled it apart and let it cook for another hour to reduce the liquids. Here it is ready to eat. I warmed up some tortillas and proceeded to make tacos. And enjoyed them with a Stockyard Oatmeal Stout. Due to the Tapatio and chipotle powder the meat had a bit of a kick. As we ate our tacos my wife gave it a "this is awesome" comment. Now to understand exactly what that means you have to remember that she doesn't like red meat. (Or so she thinks) Every time I buy beef she asks me why. So if she said it was "awesome" you have to believe it.
  12. I have yet to perfect any kind of rub or injection of my own. This is due to the fact I am still practicing and learning how get a perfect cook. While I do burgers and steaks on my Akorn, I usually smoke either pork butts, or pork spare ribs (brisket once a year when I purchase a quarter side of beef). Since I am still trying to perfect the smoking process, I leave it up to those who have already perfected their rub processes. I've tried some store bought rubs in the past, and McCormick makes a mean Pulled BBQ dry rub. But this week I decided to try something new. I found a company out of Waxahachie, Texas named Meat Church. They are a competition BBQ team that have marketed their rubs through social media, and after reading reviews on their spices, I decided to take the plunge. Best part is, you get either 10 or 12 oz bottles of each, where the rubs I find in the store are usually 6oz, and they were almost the same price of some of the things I found in the store. They have 7 different rubs, and 3 different injections. I went with what they call the Fab 5. It comes with: Honey Hog BBQ, Honey Hog Hot BBQ, Holy Cow, Season-All and Deez Nuts. They also have a fajita seasoning and a Bacon BBQ rub. I like my pulled pork on the sweet side with a bit of heat. And I like my beef with a nice amount of salt, garlic and black pepper. With Honey Hog Hot and the Holy Cow, I get just that. Interesting thing about the Honey Hog Hot bbq, there is some sugar in it, but they actually use honey power for most of the sweetness. And instead of cayenne for the heat, they use jalapeno power for the heat. Gives it such an interesting flavor. I haven't added it to any cooks yet, just tasted a little taste of each to see the flavor profile. I look forward to showing off a few smokes with these soon. I think tomorrow I am going to use a bit of the season all and the honey hog hot bbq tomorrow on a pork tenderloin and grill that bad boy up. Their site is just http://www.meatchurch.com/
  13. davidcfmt

    Home made lunch meat

    Hello everyone Just wanted to share a recipe for homemade rotisserie lunch meat. Comes out really good and is far cheaper than deli lunch meat This makes enough for about 1 2-3 lbs roast but you can scale it quite easily. All measurement a approximates. 2-3 lbs Top loin sirloin roast or other roast that is more less a constant thickness Marinade 4 tbls worshessiersauce 1-2 tbls soy sauce 2 TBLS pepper 2 TBLS kosher salt or ground sea salt 1 tsp cayenne pepper 1 tsp paprika 1 tbls ground rosemary 2 tsp sage 1 tsp mustard powder 1 bottle of beer Water to cover completely Rub Mayonnaise base thin coat 2 tbls pepper ground 2 tbls kosher salt 2 tbls ground rosemary mortar and pestle to grind really fine Instructions Mix marinade in gallon bag add ½ cub water and mix Add roast Cover roast in water marinade at 12-36 hours Warm roast to room temp Coat with mayonnaise Rub in rub On Kamodo JoeTisserie cook at 350 until 145 deg Light Smoke recommended hickory or mesquite preferred Let rest wrap in foil for 1-3 hours Cool in fridge or freeze to slice
  14. Doing my first 14lb brisket on Friday. Want to have it ready around 6. I feel like I have two options but I I'm not sure which way to go 1. Throw it on around midnight Thursday night and pull it when it's done, wrap then throw in a cooler or 170 degree oven till dinner time. 2. Get up and get the brisket on around 6 a.m. Friday and take my chances with it getting done when I need it. I would appreciate any opinions.
  15. DerHusker

    Tri-Tip - My Way

    I’ve cooked a Tri-Tip many times but never posted the recipe. This is the way I do them and they turn out great every time. Here are the ingredients: I smear on some Worcestershire sauce, then some fresh ground salt, fresh ground black pepper, some steak seasoning and finally some fresh minced rosemary from my garden. Wrap it up for an 8 hour rest in the fridge. Shortly before the 8 hours are up I prep my kamado for 2 zone cooking and lite it up. After taking the Tri-Tip out of the fridge, I put a couple of Pecan chunks on the charcoal and placed the Tri-Tip on the indirect side. Here it is after the Maverick says the I.T. is 112 to 113. (No more than 115) I take it off and loosely tent it with foil and open up the vents for searing. Once the thermometer reads at least 500 degrees (more like 650 on the grate) I place it on for 3 a sear minute sear. Here’s a pic without the flash. After 3 minutes I flip it and took this pic with the flash. Bring it inside and let it rest for 10 minutes. I then cut it in half along the seam so I could cut it against the grain. (See the way the grain is running?) Sliced And that’s Money! Thanks for looking.
  16. Hi all you Smokers out there ...... This is an awesome cook if you want to give it a try. I thought this casserole would be good smoked so I thought I'd give it a try and it blew me away when I ate it. It really took on that smokey flavor and was outstanding. It is a Beef & Potato casserole with sliced onion, diced red peppers, cream of mushroom soup, and graded cheddar cheese. It really turned out good so go fire up those smokers and give it a try .... you'll be glad you did.
  17. Billy Grills

    Beef ribs rule!!!

    There are no words to describe the taste of this....unless you have cooked/smoked and tasted it! Without bragging, I think this feed is the best Iv'e ever cooked and thought that I would share Kamado=goodness... Thanks to forums like this! Cheers and beers, Billy.
  18. Please help my brisket flat dried out. still was tender and tasted well. people enjoyed it but know there is room for improvement.https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=2rl1HIbGNKM
  19. Smoked Beef Hot Links - Trying to Replicate a Memory Got a hankering for some smoked hot links. I really was trying to recreate the hot sausage I used to get on po-boys in New Orleans for lunch back in the late 60's at a restaurant called Mumfrey's. The original Mumfrey's on Baronne St that closed up many many years ago. It was a really really peppery hot and fully flavored sausage. Delicious. My brother and I think they were a smoked beef sausage. And that they were deep fried for the po-boys, then split and put on the bread. It was the kind of hot sausage that just exuded a delicious hot peppery sausage odor through the paper wrapping on the po-boy. That you could smell from 10 feet away and identofty it immediately. The kind that takes two 12 oz original New Orleans Barq's root beers to eat. Yumm... Here is what son and I made last week in my replication project from a recipe I created after much thought and a lot of research into various styles of a hot link. The hot paprika used was imported Spanish Chiquilin I originally bought for a Spanish chorizo. It is a really good paprika. Figured imported paprika not what was used in the Mumfrey's version but it was what I had on hand. Why not? The recipe: BEEF CHUCK ROAST 5.00 pounds 2267.5 grams Volume Weight (grams) % Kosher Salt (Diamond Brand) 7.02 tsp 21.8 grams 0.96% Ground Black Pepper 4.54 tsp 10.2 grams 0.45% Ground White Pepper 1.28 tsp 3.4 grams 0.15% Crushed Red Pepper Flakes 2.70 tsp 5.7 grams 0.25% Ground Cayenne Pepper 5.03 tsp 11.6 grams 0.51% Hot Paprika (Spanish Chiquilin) 8.38 tsp 19.3 grams 0.85% Granulated Garlic 3.61 tsp 13.2 grams 0.58% Granulated White Sugar 1.63 tsp 7.9 grams 0.35% Cure #1 (Pink Salt) 1.00 tsp 5.2 grams 0.229% Water 1.0 to 1.50 cup Links were aged for a day in the fridge. Then smoked (pecan wood) to 140 degrees internal over 5 hrs (using smoker temps from 140 to 165 degrees) and finished in a 170 degree poaching bath to 155 internal. This is a fully cooked ready to eat product. Links ready for overnight aging in the fridge Out of fridge and into my converted kitchen oven smoker. Notice the color change from the fridge aging. Some nice pecan wood smoke Tasting Notes: They do have a nice hot link kick just as they are. Good flavor. Good gently warmed, pan fried or grilled. They are going fast. Son likes them a lot. Me too. Will be lucky to have a few pounds left for the freezer. Might also consider the addition of some onion powder (probably about 0.3% by weight) in a batch. Pretty Sausage - Let's have a midnight snack Into the pan. Wonderful aroma. No french bread on hand (hey its a midnight sudden snack attack!) So we will make do with some Martin's potato bread and Hellmann's mayo of course. The Verdict They are not yet Mumfrey's hot. The overall flavor is close. My next batch will probably see the onion powder added and more of the black pepper, cayenne, and hot paprika to kick it up into the 'fire link" zone - maybe 20 to 30% more of each than what I used. Gotta think hard if they might have has some mustard powder in the original. Wonder if they had some pork in the mix?? Humm..... Anyway, I just gotta push the envelop on my taste buds almost into overload but not lose the flavor for the heat element or hide the sausage in pepper. A journey in progress. And internet searches are no help. Barely even a mention of the restaurant and nothing on their menu items for any guidance. I am close in the replication, but not there yet. A good result for a first try. And some good eating as it is in the current recipe I put together. Well, anyway it will be a fun trip and more good eating for sure along the way. And the memories will still be alive. Even after almost 50 years. Enjoy!
  20. I’ve made this dish 4 times before and it is my go to dish using a pot as it is my wife’s favorite thing I make. We first tasted Boeuf Bourguignon (or Beef Burgundy) while staying at a B & B in Carmel. They had a local restaurant bring in samples of their signature dishes. We enjoyed it very much so I tried to recreate it at home although my version is more of a stew compared to the original. I apologize in advance for the amount of pictures. (I you want the recipe you can find it in the link below: https://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/9105-chucky-2-the-sequel/#comment-93791) Here are most of the ingredients. Chuck roast trimmed and cut into approximate 1” cubes. Into a bowl with fresh ground salt and black pepper. And now the bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon for a 2 hour bath. While they were getting to know each other I prepped the veggies. First I peeled the pearl onions by blanching them first for 30 seconds. Then I cut the root end off of each one and pinched the top to get the body to pop out. Here’s most everything diced up for the pot. I also cooked up 5 pieces of bacon and reserved the bacon (that I crumbled) and the grease for use later. After that I took out the meat and placed it on a bed of paper towels to dry a little. I added some bacon grease to the pot and seared them in two batches to get a good sear on each piece. After this I put in the diced onion until they started to sweat. Then a tbsp. of butter and 3 tbsp. of flour and stirred. I then poured in the wine marinate to deglaze the pot. I let that simmer of 10 minutes and it thickened up nicely. Now I added the Bacon crumbles, garlic, carrots, celery and the beef. Now 1 32 oz. carton of beef broth, a couple shakes of dried thyme, a couple shakes of ground all spice, 1 tsp. of Kitchen Bouquet and 10 springs of fresh thyme. I placed this on the kamado and brought it to a boil. Now I covered and moved over to the indirect side to simmer for 2 hours at 325 degrees. After 90 minutes I add the potatoes. After 2 hours I brown the shallots. And add them and the pearl onions, stir and simmer for another 15 minutes. I then add the parsley, stir and simmer for another 15 minutes. I moved it over to my gasser so I could bake my biscuits. Here are the biscuits in the kamado. After 5 minutes I removed the lid. The Boeuf Bourguignon is done and so are the biscuits. Plated shots with a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon and some flowers as well as Flower from Bambi. (My wife’s idea). Superbe, Magnifque!
  21. Greetings Gurus! I know some of you have seen the existing thread on The SteakAger but I wanted to start a different thread and give you a more complete look at this product and some more information about it... What is it? The SteakAger The SteakAger is a home dry aging chamber that lives inside your existing refrigerator to produce high quality dry aged meats. Here are some photos of the unit: Front on view... Angle Side View... Another angle side view... The SteakAger has a small LCD display on top that shows the temperature inside the chamber in F and C as well as the humidity and the amount of time the chamber has been running. There is a bluetooth app being released in the future that will give some control of this LCD. There is a small UV lamp inside for the purpose of helping keep a bacteria free environment inside the chamber... Interior width... Interior height... Interior depth... I am really excited about the possibilities with this product. I love dry aged beef and I think this device will be an improvement over the dry age bags I have used in the past for dry aging beef at home. This unit is the first of three models that will be produced. This unit is also the smallest of the three. My Man Cave refrigerator is a hand-me-down side by side refrigerator freezer so the fridge side is not very wide. THIS unit will sit facing foward in my side-by-side. Anything larger would NOT fit facing foward. It may fit a larger one facing to the side though but a normal non side-by-side fridge would be the best solution for the larger models coming out later in the year. This unit is capable of holding some larger sized roasts up to about 13 pounds depending on the shape of the roast. I picked up a NY Strip roast last night to dry age in this SteakAger. It weighs about 12.5 pounds and I am going to need to trim a couple inches from one end to make it fit here. Not a big deal.. I will have one or two non-dry-aged steaks off this roast I will be starting that roast in the SteakAger in the next day or so and I will highlight that entire dry-aging process in this thread, so stay tuned!
  22. After seeing a few Pulled Beef and Pepper Stout Beef posts, I wanted some but my freezer was devoid of any leftovers from previous cooks. This situation could not stand so I cooked up a new batch. Lucky for me Chuck was on sale. Ingredients: Rubbed. Wrapped. Smoking. Veggies. Chopped. Chuck is ready. On the veggies. Covered and back on the grill. Pulled. Yum! I portioned this up and will use some for burritos soon. The rest made their way into the freezer. Link to recipe if anyone wants it:
  23. Fordmustangfan67

    Joetisserie beef tenderloin questions

    Hey guys I've got a decent sized piece of beef tenderloin (about 2.5lbs I think) that I'd like to cook today. I was thinking about using the joetisserie on my classic. Is this a good idea? Or should I try and do more of a reverse sear on it? Either way can you guys give me a quick guide maybe like temps to cook at an how to arrange the lump? Thanks for any advise and thoughts!
  24. We made a massive sale run two weekends ago and I picked up 3 flat iron steaks, had one for dinner this Sunday. It was a simple and direct affair, salt and pepper on the steak and a hot Primo - 400f . Here's where we started: I used a multi-flip method, here it is at about 110f internal temp. Here we are ready to pull it, I think I read low 130's f here: And all slice up. I think you can even tell from the pic how tinder it was. Good stuff! For the 'fixin's' I used a wok with a little oil in it and tossed in a mess of French green beans, a bunch of cherubs I cut in half along with some rosemary, garlic powder, salt and pepper. I just cooked it until the beans were soft but still a little firm and the juice from the cherubs thickened to slightly coat the green beans: Man this was good for us! This seems like a perfect combination of foods it was truly delish.
×