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Found 22 results

  1. Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, And Curing http://amzn.to/1Pjxj7A by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn The recipe for the curing brine is as follows: 4 liters of water 350 grams of kosher salt 225 grams sugar 42 grams pink curing salt (Instacure #1 or Prage Powder #1) 1 large bunch fresh sage 1 bunch fresh thyme 2 garlic cloves, peeled and lightly smashed 1 3-4 pound pork loin Directions: Place half of the water in a large stock pot. Add the rest of the ingredients. Dissolve the salt and sugar over medium heat and bring the brine to a slow simmer. Let simmer for about 10 minutes with the lid on. (It's a good idea to either chill the remaining 2 liters of water in advance or have 2 kilograms of ice prepared for the cooling.) Remove the brine from the heat and let cool. Add the chilled water OR the ice to completely chill the brine. Put the brine in the fridge until its below 40 degrees. Add the pork loin to the brine and keep in the cold brine for 48 hours. After 48 hours, remove the pork from the brine and set on a rack in the refrigerator for another 12 to 24 hours. Prepare your smoker for indirect smoking at around 200 degrees. Place the pork loin on the smoker and let it stay there until you reach an internal temperature of 150 degrees in the pork. Remove from the smoker and let cool on the counter tented loosely with foil for 60-90 minutes. Place in a ziploc bag and refrigerate until completely chilled. Slice and enjoy!
  2. We all know the impact brine can have on poultry. There’s a lot more foods that can benefit from great brine. The idea to brine salmon came to me while watching an episode of America’s Test Kitchen. The ladies were pan searing salmon but I felt the brine would also have a huge impact on helping the fats to render quicker creating a moister and more tender salmon. I also took some additional advice and pulled the farmed salmon at 125 F. The result was salmon perfection. A moist flaky and buttery salmon without using any butter. The rendered salmon fat did all the hard work Brining creates one of the best salmon’s I’ve made in a while. Brine in a large container: - 3 1/2 cups of water - 1/4 cup of Dark brown sugar or Maple Syrup - 1/2 of full of lemon juice - 1/4 of Kosher Salt Let it sit in the fridge for for 4 hours, then cook at 300 F with Beech smoking wood until you reach an internal temp of 125 F for farmed salmon or 120 F for wild salmon You can see the results in the image below with with the sweet salmon fat bubbling up to the surface. The result of brining.
  3. got 5 lbs of spareribs for grilling tomorrow. Meathead's Memphis dust. the new thing that I am trying is salting the ribs overnight with a little kosher salt. i have no idea what it is supposed to do, but I think I read it from something meathead mentioned. I'll try and get pictures and give some feedback here later, but I was wondering if anybody else has tried to apply a bit of salt to the ribs like this for a few hours or overnight, and how did you like it, or not.
  4. Ok have a packer brisket trimmed and in a brine for last few days, with the plan of brining for 7 days and then smoke, but have read a lot of different reports that it's better to leave in brine for over 14 days? any one done of any advice
  5. A while back I was researching whether brining is advantageous for fish. The "Test Kitchen" ran several tests and determined that yes, fish is well suited to brining. They recommended 45-60 minutes max at I forget what percentage mixture. I recently purchased Oakridge Rubs "Game Changer Brine Mix". I used their mixture recommendations (which mirrored the the same time limit as the test Kitchen). So, I brined for 50 minutes, dried off the fish, seasoned simply with butter, lemon, and dill. Cooked on Joe Jr, indirect, at about 500 (wanted 400 but it got away from me) for 16-17 minutes. The cooked texture was very good...almost silky. I did not sense a flavor profile from the brining, and it did not seem the least bit salty. The cooked fish was slightly more pale in color than those I did not brine. Note -- it was farm rasied salmon so they are not the most colorful to begin with The flavor and texture was very satisfying to me. I think I will do it this way all the time going forward. The side dish was Trader Joe's Root Veggies (sweet potato, parsnip, beets, and carrots) roasted per their instructions. Really easy, really tasty...
  6. I will be trying the wet brine method for pastrami. Since brisket is not so easy to get here I will be trying it with round roast from Costco. Today I ordered 1kg dextrose and 500 g size package of coriander seeds whole. I already have the Insta cure 1 but don't currently have dextrose. I will use my own mill to make coarse grind of coriander and black pepper which I will use to coat the meat after the smoking process. Plan is to inject 15% of the meat weight with brine solution and brine it for 5 days in my 18 quart briner. It will post pictures some of the prep and then pictures of final product, I am hoping to start by Friday or Saturday next week. The recipe I will be following is from Great Sausage Recipes and meat curing by Rytek Kutas.
  7. Got a buddy coming in for a visit in a few weeks and we'll be having a smokefest for a few days and smoked tuna is one of the items on the list. I'm trying to figure out a brine/process/recipe and am wondering if anyone has any recommendations. I'm temped to go with John's smoked salmon recipe because it was amazing on the salmon I smoked, just use tuna instead but don't know if tuna brines/cooks/smokes differently than salmon. Any thoughts or recommendations are much appreciated! Thanks Gurus!
  8. Today's turkey cook went exceptionally well in spite of the weather today (24°F with light snow falling here in Norther Colorado). I had put the bird in brine yesterday mid-morning. This morning, after parking the Akorn on the driveway and lighting up the lump (Rockwood) I prepped the bird for the cook. After taking it out of the brine I patted it dry, tucked the wings back, and slipped fresh herbs (sage, rosemary, thyme) between the breast meat and skin. Then I rubbed it all over with soft butter and olive oil, sprinkled with sea-salt and dried herb blend and tied the leg ends. I got it on the grill by 8:45 AM. My dual-probe temp monitor (Maverick ET-733) showed that even during cold weather my kamado maintained decent temperature (320-335 °F) during the two and a half hour cook. I gave myself more time than I needed as this is my first time doing a cold-weather cook. Smoke wood used was peach and pecan. By 11:15 the deep breast temp was 165°F. I brought it in and covered it with foil and a towel so the temps could even and and it would cool a bit so I wouldn't scald my fingers while carving (I gotta get some grilling gloves). The overall quality of the turkey meat was superb. Not too much smoke flavor, very moist and tender. The dark patches on the breast skin are where I had the fresh herbs tucked under. I had always wanted to smoke the turkey for Thanksgiving. Until I got a kamado it was not possible in cold weather. After today's success in less than ideal weather conditions, I think I'll be smoking the Thanksgiving turkey from here on out.
  9. Hey everyone. Been reading here lots but this is my first post about a recent cook. Around Father's Day this year I got a new Akorn Kamado and have really liked it after many cooks on it. For years I've always wanted to smoke the turkey for Thanksgiving. Now that I have the Akorn this becomes attainable (Northern Colorado can get cool in November). Over the weekend I wanted to test out the process I'll use to cook the turkey. I brined two chickens for around 14 hours (brine: salt, brown sugar, sage, rosemary, thyme, bay) then added fresh herbs to the cavities of each (sage, rosemary, thyme) and cooked them on my Akorn for about 4.5 hours at around 230°F using three small chunks each of peach and pecan. Internal temp was 165°F when I brought them in for a 20 minute rest before carving. We served the chicken with mashed potatoes with parsnips and broccoli and cauliflower casserole. These chickens were the most moist and tender birds I've ever prepared. The flavor was very nice as well. The herbs came through enough and the smoke was a good accent flavor. This cook was also my first opportunity to use my new Maverick ET733 (dual-probe temp. monitor). That sure helps to keep an eye on temperatures without having to open the top. I also bought a bag of Rockwood premium lump to use for these cooks. Normally I use whatever I can get for around $0.50 / lb. at Costco or Lowes. The Rockwood is more expensive but I do like it. This cook helped me to make sure that I'm ready for the Thanksgiving bird. Depending how big of a turkey we get I suspect I'll need to get up pretty early to get it started. Cheers!
  10. With Thanksgiving coming up I thought I’d post how I did our last Thanksgiving Turkey. I started dinner prepping on Wednesday morning by making up the brine. Here it is cooking. Basically this is Alton Brown’s Brine with a few tweaks. Ingredients: 1 gal. Vegetable stock. 1 cup salt ½ cup brown sugar 1 tbsp. Peppercorns 1 ½ tsp. allspice 1 ½ tsp. ginger 8 cloves 2 Bay leaves Combine and then bring to a boil stirring occasionally. Then remove and cool to room temp and then chill in fridge. After it chilled I poured into a food safe 4 gal bucket. I then placed it into an ice chest surrounded by ice. I placed my cleaned turkey (without innards) into the brine solution. I then took 1 gal. of heavily iced water and pour on top. And place the lid on it and let it rest overnight. Now I load the kamado with charcoal & some Pecan chunks and setup it up indirect cooking. Thursday Morning starts out with making up some seasoned butter rub. Ingredients: 1 ¼ sticks of butter 2 tbsp. Montreal Chicken seasoning ½ tsp. Sage powder ½ tsp. Rosemary flakes And some aromatic items to place inside the bird. Ingredients: 1 Apple sliced into 1/8th’s ½ sliced onion 1 Cinnamon stick 1 tsp. Sage powder 4 sprigs of fresh Rosemary Take the turkey out of the brine and place it on a prep tray. Create some pockets under the skin for the seasoned butter. Slide the seasoned butter in under the skin. Now in go the aromatics. Slather what’s left of the seasoned butter rub all over the bird. And finally inject some butter into the breasts. (1 stick) Light up the kamado and let it heat up to 250 and then put the turkey on. (This lets the bird absorb some smoke) Now ramp up the temp to 500 for 30 minutes. (To crisp up the skin) And this is what she looks like. Now ramp down the temp to 325 to 350 to finish off the cook. (Mine took an additional 2 hours for the breast temp to reach 160) Here’s my “Money Shot” Aside from looking great this bird was the best tasting turkey we’ve ever had. Everything was so moist with a nice smoke flavor to go along with the Sage / Rosemary / Montreal Seasoned butter. Everyone at the table said they were sorry they were too full to eat more. I will defiantly be doing more turkeys this way.
  11. I followed recipe 20 from book BBQ 25. I substituted calamansi honey and used half the lemon juice in the baste. The chicken where brined overnight. First image of chickens was at 45 min mark just before basting with herb brush,. I basted a total of three time over 45 minutes, 15 minutes between each baste. I use 3 chunks of apple wood just before putting the spatchcock chicken on skin side up. Cooking method indirect at 300 F. Taste is very nice, smoke just right not too strong or over powering,
  12. Couple items that I've recently stumbled onto: The flavor found in each of these cans is outstanding. Starting to see them in different local grocery stores now. Good stuff !! The next pair is a couple of excellent products from Mad Hunky. http://madhunkymeats.com Jrow recommended the wing rub to me a while back and I ordered a pound of it to try. He knew that I enjoyed grilled hot wings when he made the recommendation and the rub is very much to my liking. The heat is not what this rub is all about, however, it's the other great flavor that goes along with it. The heat isn't all that much and they offer a second version that is much hotter. I'm not that crazy about stuff that's insanely hot. This standard version is right on time for me. I've used this rub on almost every wing cook I've done since getting it. Sometimes I'll use it in combination with another rub. I've found some great combinations, too. Well.....I killed that first pound of rub surprisingly fast and reordered another pound. This has become a staple. While on their webpage, I poked around and saw their poultry brine. I figured what the heck, I'll go ahead and get some, too. Never know until you try it, right ? I went ahead and ordered two packs and I regret not ordering more than that. 5 tbsp of the brine powder mixed with two cups of tap water........stirs in and blends very easily. My wife has been broiling chicken breasts in the oven a lot over the past few weeks. We've been brining them for anywhere from 4 hours to overnight. The results are nothing short of excellent. Moist, flavorful and not overly spiced in any direction. Even the overnight soak was just right. Impossible to overdo it with this stuff in terms of time. I'm looking forward to doing some wings and whole birds in the future. I have no reason to think that it'll not work well on turkey, too. We've got some boneless chops in the brine now. Gonna see how they do. Anyway, folks.....just wanted to pass along a couple of things I have really found to be rock solid products that I'll keep in the cabinets all the time from now on. When I thanked Jrow.....he also put me on another all-purpose rub. I've ordered a couple bottles and will be using it as soon as I can. I'll update this thread with the results. Please, please, please feel free to post up similar findings that you've recently stumbled across if you'd think others would like them.
  13. This will be the second time I've tackled this Chuck Hughes recipe, the first time was in 2011 in an electric oven if I recall correctly. IMO, it's an awesome recipe and the stuffing and meatballs are out of this world. I'm skipping those accouterments this year, as integral and delicious as they are, as my mom will be bringing some of her own; but I can wholeheartedly recommend the entire recipe from top to bottom should anyone else be curious. Roasted Turkey with Turkey Meatballs: Chuck Hughes So first things first, is the brine (and injection)… I added some orange slices and substituted three-color peppercorns for black as it's what I had available. Ingredients below are particulars for my current brine 2 cups hot water 1 3/4 cups molasses 2 cups sea salt 2 cups brown sugar Small Handful of (red, green, black) peppercorns 2 lemons, sliced 2 oranges sliced 2 medium onions, quartered 3 (smaller) heads of garlic, smashed 1 large bunch fresh rosemary 32 cups/8 l cold water 22.7lb turkey Right now I'm tossing around how I'm going to implement the "drip" pan. I have two main options. 1. do it like the recipe calls for: Turkey in the pan sitting on top of some leeks (chicken broth in the pan) 2. pan floating on X-rack, turkey on main grill above it - possibly sitting on top of some leeks while others sit inside the pan (chicken broth in the pan) I'll be watering down the broth as I recall in 2011 the resulting sauce/drippings were a salt-lick and the leeks while amazing, were obviously too salty to eat much of. I ended up cutting the results with some other stuff to make a gravy/sauce. This year I thought I'd also throw some carrots and potatoes into the broth sometime before the cook is complete - but not at the start as this is going to take at least 3 hours. Christmas Day The charcoal is lit and Big Joe is coming up to temperature - deflectors in their lower/standard position. The grill will warm up for about an hour before I put the bird on, that should give me enough time to do some cleanup around here. And the bird's on. Between the ceramic deflectors and grill sits the X-rack holding a broiler pan with 1L of chicken stock, leeks cut in half lengthwise and some bits of the turkey that I found in the cavity (the neck and some other unidentified part). Two small pieces of apple wood added for smoke - smells great. Just waiting for the temps to climb back up. I had it sitting around 380 before putting the wood, pan and turkey on, now it's still only at 280 after having closed the lid about 15 minutes ago. Slowly getting to my target of 325. And a few hours later... About an hour before the bird was done, I dropped a bunch of halved carrots into the broth pan below it to accompany the leeks. Everything turned out great. Potatoes and other veg were prepared and cooked in the house, sorry no photos. Thankfully my wife snapped the above or I would have missed taking one of the bird too. Oops.
  14. For those following my Wet Curing of a Fresh Leg of Pork, it's come to the time we've been waiting for! My leg of pork has wet cured for 10 days and is now (or at least I'm hoping) a properly cured ham. All that is left is to smoke cook it and that is currently underway. There is definitely a different look to the meat, it looks like the cure has properly done its job. I let it ride in the curing brine for ten days and resisted all urges to mess with it save for a few quick peeks to make sure the whole thing was submerged. Now the moment of truth is not too far off and I hope to hit pay dirt. As mentioned in the other thread, if this is successful then I will be undertaking more advanced curing and smoking projects as that is where my true interest lies. Right now the ham is cruising along at 225 F with some local lump I got from my buddy and a few nice chunks of Hickory. It sure smells nice out of the top vent! I hope it tastes nice too. The plan is to slow smoke this tonight and then re smoke it in the morning with some kind of glaze in the final hour. I'm still undecided as to what the glaze will be, I can go in so many directions but I think I will make my final decision once the ham goes through its first smoke and I can get a flavor profile off of it. I'm not sure how sweet the ham will be since I used a good portion of dark brown sugar, real maple syrup, and honey in the curing brine. Time will tell. Until then, here's a shot of it about one hour in on the Akorn. Nothin too exciting yet and it's a crumby ipad pic but it will have to do for now.
  15. But first I need some advice. Today I scored a fresh, vacuum sealed whole ham for 27 bucks and change! It's uncured, unsmoked, all that. I plan to sugar cure/brine it and hot smoke it in the Akorn with hickory. Who has a good brine recipe/method and what should I expect when smoking this near 19 pound beast on the Akorn? This is going to be for Christmas so I've got a few weeks; I have a food grade 5 gal bucket and lid plus space in the fridge for said bucket can be made. I'm interested in a proper cure and if it takes several days or more I'm cool with that. What have ya got?
  16. Oh Give Thanks - a Turkey Meal Lord, we give thanks for the bountiful harvest and the presence of family to celebrate what you have provided for us…. Thanksgiving Turkey Meal The Cook An 18 lb Costco Butterball fresh turkey "water only injected" (this is not a salted/flavored brine injection processed turkey). Brined (salt, sugar, apple juice, garlic and onion powder, poultry seasoning , and sriracha) for 24 hours and no injection. Rinsed, dried and olive oil rubbed. Seasoned outside and under the skin. This seasoning: http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/8287-turkey-and-chicken-seasoningrub/?p=82423 Indirect cook at 350 degrees with pecan and peach wood. The skin got dark because of the higher temps, the rub, and the fruit wood smoke but it was not burned. The wings did get a bit too toasty since I got busy and did not get to foil them. This bird was done in 2.5 hours I cooked the bird over a large drip pan and in the pan added low sodium chicken broth, water (to generously cover the pan bottom) quartered whole onion, stalk of celery, some red bell pepper and parsley. Into the drip pan goes the other miscellaneous turkey parts and the neck. Add water during the cook if needed to keep from drying the pan and burning. After removing the finished bird, I strained out the veggies, cooled the liquid and de-fatted the pan drippings,reducing over heat as needed and thickened with flour/corn starch slurry. Add the chopped giblets and the stripped meat off the neck -- a wonderful gravy. No need for any additional seasonings. Any dish requiring an oven was cooked on Big(Red)Joe. The inside oven was never turned on. The sequence was: turkey & roasted garlic (350 degrees), then the stuffing (350), and finally the rolls (375). Seasoned After Brining Peach and Pecan Wood in Ash Area Inside Lower Vent for Flavor – add as needed through lower vent (vent fully open for photo) Turkey Done Carved Breast Dark Meat Carved off Bone Kamado Roasted Garlic My Daughter’s Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes - how can you pass up potatoes with roasted garlic, butter, more butter and half-and half? My Wife’s Corn Bread Dressing Recipe (fixed by daughter) on Joe (homemade corn bread, toasted white bread, butter, onion, celery, garlic, parsley, chicken broth, some turkey pan drippings, sage, poultry seasoning, salt, cayenne pepper, Cajun seasoning) Crescent Rolls Giblet Gravy from the Drip Pan Goodness My Son’s Wok Cook Schezwan Green Beans Add Some Seasonal Decorations Pour the Wine Fill a Plate, Say the Grace, and Let’s Eat
  17. With turkey day drawing near and threads popping up about our feathered friend.. Given the option of using only 1 method on a all natural bird, brine bath or an injection of your choice, what are you choosing to ensure a A+ product .
  18. I started dinner prepping on Wednesday morning by making up the brine. Here it is cooking. Basically this is Alton Brown’s Brine with a few tweaks. Ingredients: 1 gal. Vegetable stock. 1 cup salt ½ cup brown sugar 1 tbsp. Peppercorns 1 ½ tsp. allspice 1 ½ tsp. ginger 8 cloves 2 Bay leaves Peel from 1 orange Combine and then bring to a boil stirring occasionally. Then remove and cool to room temp and then chill in fridge. After it chilled I poured into a food safe 4 gal bucket. I then placed it into an ice chest surrounded by ice. I placed my cleaned turkey (without innards) into the brine solution. And place the lid on it and let it rest overnight. Now I load the kamado with charcoal & some Peach chunks and setup it up indirect cooking. Thursday Morning starts out with making up some seasoned butter rub. Ingredients: 1 ¼ sticks of butter 2 tbsp. Montreal Chicken seasoning ½ tsp. Sage powder ½ tsp. Rosemary flakes (Here’s a pic from last year) Also some aromatic items to place inside the bird. (Tweaked from last year) Ingredients: 1 Apple sliced into 1/8th’s ½ sliced onion 1 Cinnamon stick 4 sprigs of fresh Rosemary (from my garden) 6 sprigs of fresh Thyme (from my garden) 3 sprigs of fresh Sage (from my garden) 2 sprigs of fresh Oregano (from my garden) (Here’s a pic from last year) And finally make up some Cranberry, Apple & Walnut Dressing. Ingredients: 2 6 oz. Packages of Mrs. Cubbinson’s Seasoned Dressing mix 2 sticks of butter 1 cup of dried Cranberries 1 cup of finely chopped Walnuts 1 cup of minced Onion 1 cup of diced Celery 2 cups of diced Apple 1 ½ cups of Chicken stock ½ cup of Apple Cider Combine the Dressing, Cranberries, Apple & Walnuts in a large bowl. Melt the Butter in a large skillet and then add the Celery & Onion. Once this has wilted add the Chicken stock & Apple Cider and then turn the heat to low and let simmer of 10 minutes. Now add this wet mixture to the bowl and stir. Scoop this out into a dish and cover with aluminum foil. Bake for 45 minutes @ 350 degrees removing foil for the last 25 minutes. Now take the turkey out of the brine and place it on a prep tray. Create some pockets under the skin for the seasoned butter. (Here’s a pic from last year) Slide the seasoned butter in under the skin. (Here’s a pic from last year) Now in go the aromatics. (Here’s a pic from last year) Slather what’s left of the seasoned butter rub all over the bird. Light up the kamado and let it heat up to 250 and then put the turkey on. (This lets the bird absorb some smoke) Now ramp up the temp to 500 for 30 minutes. (To crisp up the skin) Then ramp down the temp to 325 to 350 to finish off the cook. (Mine took an additional 2 hours for the breast temp to reach 164) And this is what she looks like. My wife made up the table. Here are my plated shots. (My MIL - not wife) Here’s my “Money Shot” Below Aside from looking great this bird tasted ever better than last years which everyone thought couldn’t happen.. Everything was so moist with a nice smoky flavor to go along with the Sage / Rosemary / Montreal Seasoned butter. Everyone at the table said they wish they had a second stomach so they could eat more. I love smoked turkey.
  19. Tried something completely different. Love homemade pastrami. Had a sheep shoulder (this was no lamb!) and was a bit uneasy about just cooking it low and slow. Mutton can have a very off putting flavor, even for people like me who will eat almost anything that used to walk, swim, or fly. So I brined (or technically pickled) the shoulder for a week before smoking it. Used a pickling recipe from Amazing Ribs web site (for their pastrami recipe). Long story short it was awesome! Removed the shoulder from the pickle, rinsed it off, put it on a wire rack over a sheet tray to dry for about an hour. Then I coated it all over with John Henry's (a great source for spice mixes in Houston, Texas) "Texas Chicken Tickler". Put it on and cooked it for about 4 hours between 220 and 235 on my maverick. Cooked it to an internal temp of 170 (well done!). Took it out and made some fantastic sandwiches from it. It was so good that after I sliced the meat off the bone I stood in the kitchen gnawing the bones until they were as clean as if you had left them in an ant bed. The little bit of sodium nitrite gave the meat that lovely pink color (sorry I forgot to take photos, but trust me it looked as good as any deli pastrami ever). And not I am not going to get into a battle about the miniscule amount of sodium nitrite that I consumed in the meat. It looked great and tasted better. I' just give up one fast food McMeal and call it even. So if you have an old critter you need to consume consider making some kind of pastrami out of it. Sure worked for this old sheep.
  20. I’ve posted the recipe and cooking method already so most everyone knows the drill by now. Brine, Cook & Enjoy. Brine. Cook. Enjoy! Money Shot.
  21. I had a small 10-12# turkey in the freezer. Thawed it,basted in butter,sprinkled with the usual spices I use for turkey ( salt ,black pepper,garlic, sage,a little red pepper,essentially the same as poultry seasoning) plus fresh rosemary and fresh oregano, put a rosemary sprig inside cavity and baked on grill for app. 3 1/2 hrs at ~325. Placed a pan of water under bird before pacing on grill, helped stabilize temps a bit. Chased the temps a bit and over cooked a bit. Took it off heat and covered while finishing the rest of the meal. The turkey was an excellent brown, no burn, and despite overcook was very moist.I did not tie or tuck anything.Removed the paper package of gibblets of course. I did foil the wing tips and ends of legs. Very simple test, turned out well. The idea was to keep it as simple as I could. This was my first turkey and it was that easy.
  22. When I do chicken I usually do it beer can style but I thought I’d try a spatchcock style tonight. I brined it 4 hours using a modified version of jpryor’s turkey brine in the recipe section. 1 Gal Water 1/2 Cup Kosher Salt 1 ½ Tbsp Minced Garlic 1 Tsp Thyme 1 Tsp Crushed Basil 1 Tsp Crushed Rosemary 1 Tsp Ground Black Pepper 1/8 Cup Worcestershire Sauce 1/6 Cup Brown Sugar Ready for prep. Cut out the back bone. Flattened with seasoning Skin side up with a little olive oil and seasoning. On the grill. (400 degree temp) Waiting. Done. (After 70 minutes breast & thigh IT was 180. I may been able to pull it a little earlier) Money Shot Turned out great. Everyone loved it.
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