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Found 18 results

  1. So with visitors coming for dinner (the inlaws) this is the first real test – cooking for others, aiming for a set time for dinner… The pressure is on. My plan was for a really flavoursome lamb roast. Sent my wife off to my current favourite butcher – the Low and Slow Meat Co – at Tingalpa.. Can’t fault the product that we have bought from them. I will remember this one for a long time – Tomahawk Steak. Was looking for a boneless something and ended up with this magnificent Sovereign Lamb Shoulder 2.4kg of awesomeness… Cause the meat looked absolutely magnificent , I really wanted to just try and enhance but not overpower the natural sweetness that is slow cooked lamb. Picked up an awesome Garlic rub made by Lanes BBQ , and the traditional flavours of fresh garlic and fresh rosemary , salt and pepper. So my prep for this cook was pretty basic – up early and apply the rub,salt and pepper and let it sit in the fridge for a couple of hours while I got the Kamado Joe Classic sorted for the 8+hr cook for the day. Unwrapped the lamb , covered with a splash of olive oil , inserted some fresh garlic in a few locations just deep enough to be under the surface, added sprigs of rosemary to the same cut. Generous sprinkle of the Garlic rub , fresh ground salt and pepper plus added a small touch of the Stubbs Bar-B-Q rub just for that hint of something unique. Now the Kamado set up I tried something a little extra with the deflectors and some added pizza stones. The deflectors were in the low low position , I then added a pizza stone on top of this one. Put the Xrak in place and added another pizza stone. My thinking here was to include some additional “protection” to the veggies that I would be putting in there later in the afternoon. For the heat it was 80% fresh lump , a couple of small handfuls of hickory chips and I split some ironbark chunks that I had from our camping wood stockpile. After about 40mins of getting warmed up , it was time to add the meat. For the initial period I just had a tray sitting under the roast , took the opportunity to add some more aromatics to this tray and catch some of the juices /rendered fat from the lamb. Went pretty well and held temp like a champion. That is definitely one thing about the Kamado style cookers they are awesome once dialed in. On with the veggies at the 4 hour mark.The prep for the veggies was nothing special. Pumpkin,potatoes,carrots and a couple of onions. Drizzled with olive oil , sprinkled with the Lanes BBQ Garlic rub , added a good sprinkling of salt and pepper and that’s it. Added a tray (spuds) under the roast , and a second tray (pumpkin) on the top rack. Started to base the top of the roast with an olive oil garlic and rosemary mix – looking to keep it moist. At around the 6 hour mark I decided to wrap the shoulder , looking for 2 things keeping the shoulder moist and limiting the smoke content. At around the same time , I think one of the chunks of ironbark lit up and provided a tone of smoke – good for the veggies , but may have been too much on the lamb. Timing was aresy , but it worked well. For the wrap I decided to make up a liquid to add some additional flavour complexity. For the liquid I made up some beef stock , pepper , garlic , rosemary gave it a good mix up and basically poured it into the bottom of the foil wrap. Once the veggies probed tender , I pulled them off and put into a pre-warmed oven. At around the same time , the roast hit temp and decided to pull it off and rest. Once the roast was off , re-configured for a quick corn cook – chared corn on the cob… After about 30 minutes rest it was time to see what the result was… Wasn’t disappointed. Super juicy , well rendered fat , and a nice subtle flavour provided by the rub.. Awesome. To finish off the night , a little store bought apple pie !! Never had smoked apple pie before… Mmmmmmmm… Wont be the last either.. Total cook duration : 8Hrs 25Mins Kamado dome Temp ~120C (250f) wasn’t too picky with the temps as I knew it was going to be a pretty long cook. Here’s a quick video of the cook Lamb Shoulder Thanks for stopping by… Joe on !!!! Full pictures on my blog page. https://kamadoblog.wordpress.com/2018/01/30/lamb-shoulder-australia-day/
  2. well, visually at least- precursor to preivously posted Barbecue- The Movie interesting book on churrasco style bbq still determined to take a class on this
  3. An Aldi opened up a couple months ago near my house. I’ve always wanted to try their spare ribs, finally picked up a rack and gave it a try. I didn’t trim anything, just pulled the membrane off. I even kept the little meat flap on. Seasoned it with some rub I found behind the cabinet, which was not a typical rub I would use, but glad I did. Topped it off with some Killer Hogs for a little color, then let it marinate for 30min to an hour. I used a mixture of mesquite and pecan chunks. Through-out the cook, I spritzed it with diluted apples cider vinegar. My wife made a BBQ sauce that she used on bacon chicken wraps. Man was it good. I think it consisted of banana ketchup, sweet baby rays, sriracha (very little) and brown sugar. Was surprised how fresh the ribs were compared to the Kroger brand I normally get. Definitely getting those ribs again.
  4. I shared brisket with several neighbors after my last cook. They were all pretty excited afterwards. Running into one of them a couple of weeks later, he bragged about a butcher from out of state he was ordering sides of beef from and joked about a brisket in his freezer he wanted to have me smoke for him. Mostly as a reward for helping me lift and mount my Big Joe, I told him to bring it over anytime. Well, this is what he brought, about a two or three pound portion of a flat. This is high on my bucket list of things I never want to cook. (No offense but, it's right up there with pulled pork). I'm mighty tempted to grind this darn thing into hamburger or sausage and just slice him a portion of the next packer I cook.
  5. I recently got a Big Joe and due to April showers I haven't been about to use it much. I got married Saturday, and Sunday morning woke up a lot earlier than I should have and went to the grocery store right as they opened. Since I was still on the wedding high, I figured I'd do my first low and slow on the Big Joe. I got even more bold when I saw the butcher that I really trust and decided to do my first brisket. He chose the one he thought was best, about 10 pounds, and I saw $6.99/lb and asked if that was the going rate. He said "Yeah, but I'll give it to you for $3.99/lb." Thank you sir! That's what they sell ground round for! I rubbed it down with Strawberry's and Real Salt and got the grill to 225 and let it sit for a bit before putting it on (the only pic I have), fat side up (good or bad?). I decided I needed to go back to bed. Woke up 2-3 hours later and was pleasantly surprised at the staying power this thing had right out of the gate, still at 225. It went on around 8:00am, got wrapped in foil around 12-1, and I took it off when it hit 195 around 4:00. I let it rest for about 45 minutes before slicing. One pull of the knife towards me was all it took for each slice. It was better than any home prepared brisket I've had around here, you could easily cut it with a fork. Even though we were all very pleased, I couldn't help but think about when we went to Lockhart's in Dallas back around Christmas and that stuff was insaaaanely tender and juicy. How do they do it? I didn't put a drip/water pan under it, I don't know if that's necessary. I enjoyed it, and I already trust the Big Joe home alone more than I do the Akorn (still, much love to it). Two side notes here: 1. The Akorn never dripped out of the top. This thing was leaking juices the whole time. I assume this is normal because of the vents being vertical rather than horizontal? 2. The hottest I've been able to get this thing wide open is 550 with the stones in it. Am I not putting enough lump in there to get it hotter? If I take the top vent off it immediately starts soaring, but that seems hard to control. I'm enjoying the Joe and I'll try to remember to take more pictures along the way in the future!
  6. Starting the Resurrection Sunday Brisket- a 17lber from Costco. This one sort of made up for the lack of fat on my first Costco brisket. Threw a lot more of this one away. Still though, I think a have a good pre-cook 15lbs or so... Saw these at Costco- couldn't resist... gotta try 'em. And... my old standby, go to sausage... lol what a bad pic- it's Michael Kiolbasa from San Antone' Where I come from, these qualify as sides... lol
  7. Found a nice 21lb brisket @ Restaurant Depot on Saturday- my biggest to date. As I mentioned earlier, I place a high premium on even thickness at the end of the flat and this one meets my requirements nicely. It also didn't require much trimming. I'm thinking that I have at least 19.5 pounds to cook. My last brisket cook, I sold shares of the brisket to my family- cooking two briskets- selling five shares, reserving one for myself- leaving me with a $15 cost for the two briskets, 1/6th the cost. This time I am just selling by the pound- $6 per- which still is a great deal for them and having sold 13lbs- I have paid for the brisket, lump, pecan wood and gas... Anyway, it's sitting in the fridge, dry brining until early tomorrow morning after a nice bath in heavy black pepper, sea salt and a dusting or chipotle chili
  8. My mom asked for a brisket for Christmas but the demands of the weekend were just too much. So, even though I bought this 14 pounder on Friday, I didn't trim it until yesterday and threw it on this morning. Have a little trick of throwing the brisket in the freezer just long enough for the fat cap to harden a bit and make trimming easier. Also, finally bought a decent sized cutting board since I'm going to be doing briskets fairly often. Didn't have as much fat to trim on this on but, a quite a bit more silverskin to remove... Rubbed and ready to go... Coarse Black pepper, coarse sea salt, a dusting of cayenne and chili peppers... The 3am alarm challenged my commitment to this cook. Discovered @John Setzler's trick of using firestarters in the ash tray under the Big Ash Basket doesn't work as well with a single alcohol soaked cotton ball. At least it didn't after two attempts so, I just placed a KJ firestarters in the front and of the basket and about thirty-five minutes later started put the brisket on ~ 4:20am.
  9. So, restaurant depot has brisket at $2.44 a pound. Anyone want to bet on my copping a couple three this month? I have to solve this grease fire issue I've been having one cooking two briskets. I think that I (in the Texas tradition), am leaving more of a fat cap than other briskets I see on the forum. But, the fat is where it's at.
  10. I had to give this another go. My first two brisket cook was quite disasterous. So, this time I had added a DIY extension rack. There's got to be better things to do @ 1:30 am other than trimming briskets. Good, that's done. Now to catch an hour or two nap before the cook. up at 4:15 to start the fire First brisket on
  11. Hey guys, I need some advice. I've done a number of low and slow cooks on my Akorn now (mostly ribs). I've gotten pretty much everything down but one thing: consistent and good smoke. Here is my setup for ribs: I use 100% lump piled up below the tabs. I leave a hole in the middle for lighting and mix hickory and apple chunks in with the lump around the hole. I'll also add a couple on top of the fire before I put on the smoking stone and grate. I start the fire and after the flames die down and a few coals are lit, I'll close the lid and let the TTT start regulating airflow. I usually shoot for 250 for ribs. Once the grill temp gets to about 150 or so, I'll close the bottom vent to about an index finger width. The smoke will be pretty solid as the grill heats up, but dies off and eventually goes away when the grill gets up to temp. At this point, the TTT vent is just barely open. After the cook, it looks like the wood chunks have been basically turned into charcoal. I feel like there isn't enough airflow to allow for good smoke. The only two things I can think to try are either nearly shutting the bottom vent so that the TTT is open more, or trying to wrap some wood chips in aluminum foil so that they don't burn as easily. Thoughts?
  12. So I have a question for anyone willing to answer. I have seen posts on here stating that they had a butt on for 16 hours before taking it off. My question is, what temp are you taking the butt to in a 16 hour period? I reach 195 in about 7-8 hours so are you allowing the butt to continue to cook past that point, or are you trying to reduce the temp of the pit to maintain it? I am a fan of bark, and would love to be able to go that long for the extra bark it would produce, but didn't know if I was just doing something wrong?
  13. Update 04/15/2014 Since this thread was added to the recipes forum, I figured I'd give it a quick review to see if anything needs to be changed. I listed my changes below: 1. I talk about cooking at 225 degrees in my recipe write-up but I have found, as many of you already know, that butts are very forgiving when it comes to grill temperature. I have had great results cooking at 225, 250, and even 300. Your cook time is shorter with the higher temps of course. I just wanted to add this so our newer readers don't focus too much on 225. It can be a challenge to maintain 225 for 14 hours and it's not necessary. 2. Brining is easy and inexpensive and I love it as part of my butt BBQ ritual. That being said, I don't think it actually makes a huge difference in the final result. I don't find my brined butts any more flavorful or juicier. I have entered two office BBQ contests, I brined one and just rushed through the other one. I won both contests; with and without brine. I still do it because I enjoy the whole process and it makes for fun conversation when your guests are in awe of how great your BBQ is! 3. I believe the Chris Lilly injection is key! I love how simple it is to make and how the results turn out. Lilly's recipe listed below is for TWO BUTTS. Either cut the ingredients in half of save the other half of the injection. Don't try to pump the whole thing into one butt. More is not better. I tried that one time and it was entirely too salty. Original Recipe Write-Up This is the kind of cook that I would only attempt when time and patience are not a factor. I went all out on this Boston Butt for the fun of it. I know there’s a lot of debate as to whether brining, injecting, rubbing with good mustard and cooking at 225* is even worth the trouble, but for me, I just enjoy every step of the ritual and the results are outstanding. The 8 pounder took over 14 hours to reach 203* internal temperature cooking at 225* and a couple of days worth of brining. I trimmed most of the fat cap off my 8 pound butt but tried to leave about 1/8 of an inch like AmazingRibs recommended. I let it sit in a simple beer brine for a couple nights just because I had the time. I didn’t want too many flavors in the brine since I was injecting and rubbing later. Simple Beer Brine Recipe (I got this from an old BBQ cookbook that I have, can’t remember name) 12 oz beer 12 oz water Crushed bay leaves ½ cup salt ½ cup sugar A little pepper Next, I rubbed the butt heavily with Meathead’s Memphis Dust which is great on its own but I add 2 tablespoons of cumin to mine. Meathead’s Memphis Dust Ingredients 3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 3/4 cup white sugar 1/2 cup paprika 1/4 cup Morton's kosher salt 1/4 cup garlic powder 2 tablespoons ground black pepper 2 tablespoons ground ginger powder 2 tablespoons onion powder 2 teaspoons rosemary powder +2 tablespoons cumin (not in original recipe but I like the taste of cumin in BBQ) Then I injected the butt with an apple juice based injection. The butt came out super juicy but I’m thinking that was probably more due to the cut and the slow cooking. The injection is easy and cheap to make and as long as my BBQ doesn’t turn out tasting like an apple pie, I like it. The injection recipe is below (Chris Lilly’s). I only used half of this: Chris Lilly's Six-Time World Championship Pork Shoulder Injection 3/4 cup apple juice 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup white sugar 1/4 cup table salt 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce Combine all ingredients and stir until sugar and salt are dissolved. I set up my Akron with a full firebox of Kebroak lump charcoal in a well configuration and about 10 hickory chunks. I lit a starter cube, threw it down the well and closed the lid in about 5 minutes once the coals starting lighting. I set the bottom vent at 1 and the top vent at barely open. It took the grill about an hour to reach 225* but I was in no hurry since I was leaving it overnight and didn’t want to overshoot my target. I know 225* is probably overkill, I was more curious to see if I can get my Akorn to maintain that temp overnight. My Akorn is completely unmodified by the way. I kept myself busy while I was waiting for the grill to come up to temp. That was a phenomenal stout on a cool afternoon. Once temp was stable at around 225*, I put the butt on. It was 8:30 PM. I never opened the lid again until 10:30 AM the next morning. What was very scary about that is 4 hours into the cook, and a few beers later, I couldn’t remember if I had my diffuser in there or not. Luckily it was there otherwise we would’ve had some crispy pork. I left my Akorn bottom vent at a little less than 0.5 (edge of slider tangent to screw) and my top vent was only open enough to let air through the half moon part which kept temp pretty stable at about 225*-230*. I set my Maverick alarms at the following settings and went to sleep. BBQ High: 250* BBQ Low: 200* Food High: 195* Eight hours into the cook, around 5 AM, the temperature started creeping close to 250*. I went outside and closed the top vent a hair more. It really wasn’t hard to maintain close to 225* for the majority of the cook on my Akorn. Was it worth it? Not sure. I guess there’s no harm in it as long as I have all night to cook. I slept through the first stall which probably happened around 150-160 degrees but there was definitely a second stall later on. I think 170 to 180 took over 2 hours for me. My cooking helper and I enjoyed a cup of coffee as the butt got through the second stall. I snuck him a few bites later on, he seemed to really like it but he also eats dirt so that kinda discredits him as a gourmet. The butt looked great at 199 but when I checked on the bone I thought I could get it a little looser so I left in there until internal temperature reached 203 degrees. It was about 10:30 AM. I took it off, wrapped in foil and a couple of beach towels and let it rest in a cooler until company got there. We weren’t eating the butt until the Alabama/Texas A&M game so it probably stayed in the cooler for a couple hours. Alabama won that day so I am dubbing this cook my lucky butt. I’ll fix another one when we play LSU. The results were very well received by friends and family. It was very juicy with a great flavorful bark and a nice smoke ring.
  14. Hi all, I decided, today, of doing a Low and Slow Roast, more precisely a leg of lamb, boneless It's not very big, around the 2lbs marks. I started it early as I was expecting it to take a good 4h to reach 140F IT, but it is now 3pm over here and it's already at 138F IT I had my KJ at around 225-230F (Grill temp) most of the time I decided on snuffing it out a bit now to have it cook even slower, and grill temp is now at 205F Assuming I don't want to eat for another good 2h (ideally 3h), what would you recommend me of doing? Removing it now and reheat later, or leave it in there and let the KJ temp at this setting and let it drop a bit more? I realize it's a bit of messup, but... oh well Thanks for your help!
  15. I have a simple question that I am sure will have many correct answers. What temp and time frame is the best to smoke St. Louis ribs on the big joe. My current plan is to dry rub,, smoke with Apple at 225-250, and coat with sauce. The main question I have is about how long should this take? Also when should apply the sauce? I just need an approximate time frame. While I am at it where should the heat deflector be? IS it necessary to have a drip pan with liquid? I would like to stay away from the 3-2-1 method, I used to this with a Bradley I would borrow. I know a lot of questions again.
  16. Just did my first true low-n-slow. Did a duck earlier but it was more a medium than a low and slow. This was an 11 pound pork shoulder. Used John Henry's "Bubba's Rub" and Chris Lilly's pork injection recipe to season the shoulder. John Henry's is my favorite brand of rubs and marinades. Operates out of Houston, Texas. Look him up on the web. Great stuff. All in all I was pleased with the results. Used the SS colander to hold the charcoal, but used the advice I got from Toe and used a cardboard tp holder to keep the center of the charcoal open for the lighter cube. However I just left the tube there and lit it all! Worked great. Up and cooking in about 20 min. Held the grate temp between 230 and 260 for 5 hours. When the meat temp reached about 160 I pulled the shoulder, placed it in a disposable pan, sealed it well with heavy duty aluminum foil, replaced the temp probe, and put it back on. Here is where the problem began. Used two digital thermometers, one for the grate temp and one for the meat temp. Meat went to 185 and "stalled". I had read about the stall before but either never hit it or didn't notice with my other cookers (I own more than I should with out a catering business!). This being my first Kamado style I thought it might be different. After an a couple of hours I bumped the grate temp up to 340. Another hour and a half and meat was still at 185? I pulled the probe from the digital thermometer it had been in and put it in two others (all use the same probe) and all read within a couple of degrees of 185? Something had to be wrong. So I pulled the meat off and tested it with my instant read thermometer. 207! I usually stop my pork at 195 (that is where I set the alarm on the meat thermometer) and it comes off great. 207 should be dry and miserable, but it wasn't. I got lucky, I had wrapped the shoulder very well and added about a cup of apple juice to the pan and that kept it from getting bone dry. Though it was still a little dry it was not bad at all. Very tasty, Bone came out easy and clean. Pulled apart and shredded well. Had a thicker bark than I am accustomed to on pork but I treated it like "burnt ends" on a brisket, just chopped it up and mixed it well with the juices in the bottom of the pan and it turned out marvelous. We got some nice q out of the deal, but the problem with the temperature probe bothers me. It was a polder replacement and I had tested it (using ice water and boiling water) when I opened it. I will test it again tomorrow and try to see what is going on. It had to be the probe because all three digital thermometers read essentially the same temp with that probe. I know probes can fail, but I thought they would just stop reading, or read something totally weird and obviously wrong. From now on I will test my probes before each cook, just to be sure. And I am going to email Polder abut this also since this was just the second time I had used that probe and neither one was in a high temp environment. Now for another smoked pork sandwich!
  17. Just did my first true low-n-slow. Did a duck earlier but it was more a medium than a low and slow. This was an 11 pound pork shoulder. Used John Henry's "Bubba's Rub" and Chris Lilly's pork injection recipe to season the shoulder. John Henry's is my favorite brand of rubs and marinades. Operates out of Houston, Texas. Look him up on the web. Great stuff. All in all I was pleased with the results. Used the SS colander to hold the charcoal, but used the advice I got from Toe and used a cardboard tp holder to keep the center of the charcoal open for the lighter cube. However I just left the tube there and lit it all! Worked great. Up and cooking in about 20 min. Held the grate temp between 230 and 260 for 5 hours. When the meat temp reached about 160 I pulled the shoulder, placed it in a disposable pan, sealed it well with heavy duty aluminum foil, replaced the temp probe, and put it back on. Here is where the problem began. Used two digital thermometers, one for the grate temp and one for the meat temp. Meat went to 185 and "stalled". I had read about the stall before but either never hit it or didn't notice with my other cookers (I own more than I should with out a catering business!). This being my first Kamado style I thought it might be different. After an a couple of hours I bumped the grate temp up to 340. Another hour and a half and meat was still at 185? I pulled the probe from the digital thermometer it had been in and put it in two others (all use the same probe) and all read within a couple of degrees of 185? Something had to be wrong. So I pulled the meat off and tested it with my instant read thermometer. 207! I usually stop my pork at 195 (that is where I set the alarm on the meat thermometer) and it comes off great. 207 should be dry and miserable, but it wasn't. I got lucky, I had wrapped the shoulder very well and added about a cup of apple juice to the pan and that kept it from getting bone dry. Though it was still a little dry it was not bad at all. Very tasty, Bone came out easy and clean. Pulled apart and shredded well. Had a thicker bark than I am accustomed to on pork but I treated it like "burnt ends" on a brisket, just chopped it up and mixed it well with the juices in the bottom of the pan and it turned out marvelous. We got some nice q out of the deal, but the problem with the temperature probe bothers me. It was a polder replacement and I had tested it (using ice water and boiling water) when I opened it. I will test it again tomorrow and try to see what is going on. It had to be the probe because all three digital thermometers read essentially the same temp with that probe. I know probes can fail, but I thought they would just stop reading, or read something totally weird and obviously wrong. From now on I will test my probes before each cook, just to be sure. And I am going to email Polder abut this also since this was just the second time I had used that probe and neither one was in a high temp environment. Now for another smoked pork sandwich!
  18. I thought it was a good idea to touch base on a basic topic that sometimes gets buried in post about a specific cook. It's the concept of BBQ and the old saying, "It's done when it's done". After seeing a recent post about two 8 lb butts taking 17 hours to finish I thought it would be good to talk about the basic principles of the cook itself rather than the rubs or injection you use. You can never time a cook and if you think you can, you will get burned and find yourself in panic mood running around cranking up the heat trying to get your cook to finish so your hungry guest can eat. Everyone has that moment after a couple of great cooks, they figure they know how and when to cook that pork butt or brisket so everyone eats at 4:00 only to find it's 3:00 and they still have not gotten past the stall on the internal temp. Yes, your meat has been sitting at 145-150 for 2 hours and everyone is showing up We have all been there, so lets talk about how to plan ahead and how to be that guy who always looks in control and everything is just running like clockwork at the BBQ. You know that guy and hate him so much and wonder how he does it? Food is done on time, cooked just right and everything flows like butter. First, lets understand what BBQ is: It started as the poor mans way to take a very tough piece of meat and make it edible. The tough meats were passed down to people who could not afford the better cuts and nothing in the animal went to waist so cooking those tough pieces of meat were never a challenge to people with lesser means in life. Now BBQ has become a delicacy of sorts and not everyone is up to the challenge of making it and doing it right. Today the average backyard Joe who flips some burgers and dogs on sunday and dreams of being "That guy" who can churn out some great Q and be the envy of everyone finds its not so easy. Cooking BBQ is the easy part, low and slow but planning the BBQ is the tough part and having it all come together and tasting like the food you get at the Rib Cookoffs is an art form. I could say to cook your BBQ at 225 at 1 1/2 hours per pound and end this whole discussion and shut down the forum because we all now have the secret to cooking great BBQ and whats left to talk about! BUT, it's not so cut and dry. Your brisket and pork butt come from and area of the animal that has a lot of connective tissue in the meat and BBQ is about breaking down that tissue so the meat is not like shoe leather to eat. You can certainly eat a brisket cooked at 145-150 internal temp but geez oh man it's going to be the toughest chew you ever had. The low temp of the cook gives the tissue a chance to melt or breakdown and also a chance for the smokey flavor to slowly soak into the meat giving these cuts a better flavor. The problem is knowing how long it will take for the tissue to break down in the meat and the simple answer is, you never will know. A 5lb pork butt can take longer than a 7lb butt and I know people think well I did a 7lb butt 2 weeks ago and it took 9hrs so a 5lb will only take 7hrs. Not so and this is where the panic comes in and the guest are standing around looking at you. This breakdown of tissue will be different from one cut of meat to another and if you bought 2-7lb buts you could have one finish 2hrs before the other. Think it through and know if you add an extra butt on the cooker it will add more cook time because you added more mass to the grill. So understanding this and planning for this is your best bet. You can store your cooked meat wrapped up in a cooler for 5-6 hrs and it will be just as good and hot if you just pulled it off the grill, so give yourself a big window when timing your cook. If I am serving at 3:00pm on sunday, I am putting my meat on at 12:00 midnight the night before and yes I sleep good because this has to do with me knowing my cooker and lots of practice cooks. Each cooker is different and getting to know yours is the key to success and being "That Guy"! Having the meat done early gives you an advantage in being able to focus on side dishes, drinking a few cold ones with your guest and making sure everyone is having a good time and helping the wife do her thing.... So plan your cook and know your cooker and understand that every piece of meat you plan on cooking could yield a different time will only make you "That Guy" that everyone would love to hate Plan ahead!!!!
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