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Found 2 results

  1. Had an old sheep that I killed and butchered. Cooked some of the tenderloin and discovered that on an old sheep (mutton) even the tenderloin can be a bit odd tasting, even for a guy like me who will eat virtually anything that once walked, swam, or flew. So I took a whole shoulder and treated it the way I do when making pastrami. Made a pastrami pickle following the recipe on Amazing Ribs web site and soaked the shoulder, in the refrigerator of course, in the brine for a week. Took it out, rinsed it in clear water, placed it on a wire rack for a couple of hours to dry, and then coated it really well with John Henry's "Texas Chicken Tickler". John Henry's is a great place to get spice blends out of Houston, Texas. I love their rubs. Cooked the shoulder on my Akorn Kamado cooker at 220-235 degrees for 4 hours. Used some almond chunks for smoke. When the meat temp reached 168 F I took it off and let it rest for about 5 minutes (just couldn't wait!). It was awesome! As good as any pastrami I have ever made or eaten. No mutton taste at all. And it was tender and very moist. After trimming all the meat I could off the bones I stood in the kitchen gnawing on them till they were as clean as if you had put them over an ant bed for a week! The sodium nitrite gave the meat that beautiful pink color (and I am not worried about the miniscule amount of sodium nitrite I consumed. I will just eat one less McMeal and call it even). So if you have any old critters that need to be consumed, give the pastrami recipe a try. Might even make armadillo taste OK?
  2. Here in New Mexico, the indigenous and Mexican traditions call for searing thinly sliced red meat over a wood fire and eating this with bread, chiles and fried potatoes. You can find thinly sliced filets of red meats at most all Mexican grocers, and thin cut rib eyes of bison, buffalo, filets of mutton and venison at local whole foods style grocers all over the country. What you do is set your coals and wood up for medium-high to ultra-high heat searing and cook to desired doneness, preferably medium-rare with charred bits and no grill marks. Frequent turning creates a great crust on the outside of the meat. You then tear apart chunks or thinly slice the meat, place it in a flat piece of fried but flexible bread dough, add a piece of roasted chile, preferably Hatch green, and then top with some fried potatoes and salt. Navajos make frybread in cast iron skillets with lard after frying potatoes and a little onion. Mexicans make sopapillas. You can by mixes for these and they taste similar. You can even fry thin round flats of pizza dough till lightly browned. Fold this up and enjoy! Seared Coffee and cocoa rubbed bison rib eye filet sandwich: I just rubbed some bison rib eye filets with coffee, cocoa, spices and hot chile oil and seared them over pecan wood. Roasted green chiles, fried potatoes and onions went in a homemade frybread with the meat. The gamey flavor is important to the dish as this is true frontier food! I would love to know if anyone else cooks like this on their kamado!?
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