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Found 22 results

  1. Hey family, I plan to smoke 7 pork butts on my Big Joe using my extender rack. All the butts weigh between 7-8 pounds. Should I maintain the general rule of approx 1.5 -2 hours cook time at 225? With that, is it fair to say this cool will be approx 16 hours for all 7 butts? I just want to make sure the extra capacity doesn’t affect my cook time. I’d appreciate advice based on prior experience from you folks. Thanks!
  2. I am firing up my Kamado Joe Classic to cook a 10 pound pork shoulder roast overnight... I am going to use the Flame Boss 200 Wifi controller to run the pit overnight... it's windy and rainy here tonight... Here is a link to the live cook on the Flame Boss: https://myflameboss.com/cooks/61380 I will post some photos of the meat prep shortly....
  3. I bought a two pack of boston butts at Sam's Club the other day and assumed I would have two 8 pounders since the package weighed about 16 pounds... Well one of them was 10 and the other was about 6.. I cooked the big one today (or am cooking it). It's been on about 10 hours at 250-ish and the internal temp is up to about 187. This one looks great so far! Its gonna be on a good bit longer to finish and then I'll rest it for a while before pulling and packaging...
  4. I first want to thank the Kamado Guru community for all the information that has been posted - I have learned so much and expect to learn so much more! I attempted my first smoked pork shoulder and beef brisket today. Rubbed both the brisket and shoulder last night with some salt, pepper, and garlic powder and left them in the fridge overnight. Early this morning, fired up the Akorn and got it coasting around 225 and threw both on. It stayed around 225 for the first several hours, then started climbing up to 250, then 275, then came back down to 250s. All in all, the 4-5 lb pork shoulder took about 7 hours to get to internal temp of 200, and the 5-6 lb brisket (packer) took about 9 hours to get to the "magical" internal temp of 203. Hopefully this is the first of many more to come.
  5. How many pork butts have you folks cooked at once in a KJC? I'm trying to load the freezer up in preparation for the arrival of a new kiddo and am wondering how many you can fit/have fit in the past. I'll be using the costco butts which tend to be 8-10lbs. I think two is a pretty tight squeeze on the main grill and am wondering if I can do a third on the extender but am not sure how that works. Has anyone tried ti lay them on their sides? Would that get you one more on the main grill? Also, what is the timing you've experienced with two butts (approximate)? If you've done two on the main grate with a third on the extender I'd be interested in the cook time (approximate, I know, I know...its done when its done). I'll probably be running at 275-300 on the maverick. Thanks for the input Gurus!
  6. I bought a two pack of boneless pork butts from Costco since they didn't have bone-in when I was stocking up and when I opened the package the removal of the bone left a huge flap of meat. Instead of carving the bone out it seems the cut was made all the way through the shoulder. So the shoulder is almost sliced into two pieces but is still connected. Not sure if it was a bad butcher job but I've never experienced this on the 10 or so boneless butts I've done in the past. Thoughts on how to smoke it? Fat cap down/up (based on preference) or should I open up the shoulder flat on the grill? One concern is that if I don't lay flat on the grill the inside of the pocket will have pockets of rub. Maybe after 10 hours it wont matter. The other thing I'm worried about is it drying out since its not at thick as the end piece where the two pieces are still connected. Let me know what you guys think. Thanks in advance!
  7. Wanted to get some thoughts on bone in vs. boneless for a pork butt. In NC I picked up my meat from Costco and the butts were all boneless which was fine, I didn't think anything of it. I went to a local meat market and found a great deal on a pork shoulder and then when it was time to rub realized it was bone- in which threw me off. Fast forward: I'm now in Texas and there are some price differences (large ones) with great selection for bone in vs. boneless. Wanted to get some thoughts on bang for buck and a qualitative difference between the two. Obviously, you're paying for the bone and that's dead weight but the price per pound is cheaper. I didn't notice a big difference on finished product taste between the two but wanted some input from you guys and gals. Thanks!
  8. Next time I make promises of pulled pork I will be checking the weather forecast. Flashback to last Tuesday... Wife: "Can we have pulled pork sandwiches this weekend" BigSmoke: "Does a one legged duck swim in circles?" It was a long miserable rainy night. Thankfully I had a pop up tent to keep my setup relatively dry, however, it was the wind that really made it tough to moderate temperatures. I picked up a 10.4 lb butt on Friday and had it trimmed, injected, rubbed with Dizzy Dust (Mustard to help bind), cling wrapped and in the fridge to marinate over night. Saturday evening I fired up the KJ at 8pm, after reaching a stable 250 degree dome temp I loaded the butt (10pm). The plan was to have it resting by 1pm for kick off and ready to eat by halftime but I hit a stall that lasted over 3 hrs (Would not budge from 151 degrees), I'm guessing the wind and swings in temp had a part to play. I ended up having to raise the temp to 350 degrees for the final hour and I pulled the butt just after 2pm. The IT was reading 198 degrees and it was probing tender. I let it rest for 20 mins before FTC for about 1.5 hrs. The cooler was pre-heated with hot water. Despite the hiccups I am quite proud of the final product. It was a huge hit and by far the best pulled pork sandwich I've ever made! I served it with homemade coleslaw, bbq sauce and sweet potatoes. The grilled sweet potatoes were coated with an orange marmalade butter. Recipe courtesy of Bobby Flay. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/grilled-sweet-potato-wedges-with-orange-molasses-butter.html
  9. It’s been a while since I made some of this awesome pork dish and decided to remedy that. Here are most of the ingredients for the marinade and the pickled red onion. I had also dung out a 8.85 lb. pork shoulder from the freezer that I had purchased on sale for $0.99 a lb. I cut most of the fat cap off I placed it in an aluminum chaffing pan and then scored the meat in alternating directions for better marinate penetration. I poured half of the marinade over this side and then turned it over and poured on the over half. I covered this and let it rest in the fridge overnight. Now I sliced up 2 large red onions with a mandolin. Notice how it’s close the edge of the counter? Well it got to the edge and started to fall off. Hint: JUST LIKE A KNIFE, DO NOT TRY TO CATCH A FALLING MANDOLIN! These things are razor sharp and there was lots of blood. O.K. back from the first aid station and here are all the slices. I had started a pan of water to boil and put the onions in for approximately 5 minutes and then drained them in a colander and poured cold water over them. Now I put them in a quart canning jar and squeezed in 3 Valencia oranges, 2 limes and 2 tablespoons of white wine vinegar. Along with on Habanero pepper to add just a little heat. Today I spread out some aluminum foil in alternating directions. I then spread out some parchment paper in alternating directions along with some butchers twine. And finally the banana leaves in alternating directions along with some butchers twine. I place the pork shoulder on the banana leaves and wrapped this up with my wife trying the twine for me. (This part goes so must faster with some help) Then wrapped that in the parchment paper. And finally the aluminum foil. I lite up the kamado and set it up for indirect cooking. Once it got up to 325 I put on the package. (It got up to 350) We went for a little drive now and I purchased some fresh made (still warm) corn tortillas. 4 hours later the IT was 211 degrees and ready to take off. I set it on the side of the kamado to cool a little. As it was cooling I reheated the tortillas and put them in my tortilla warmer. Now I started to unwrap the package. Oh it looks good and the smell was incredible! I fished out the banana leaves and the bone. Husker agrees that the smell was incredible! Now I pulled the meat. (It pulls so easy) Here it is plated with rice, beans and a Dos Equis Chelada. And the money shot. Muy Delicioso!
  10. Ok so I've searched this forum and found a couple of different ideas on which way I should put the skin when I smoke this roast. Please let me know what you think. Because I'm using indirect heat I'm thinking skin up this way all the fat cooks down over the meat to keep it moist. The plan is a slow and low cook in my Akorn with the smoker plate. It's a 11.5 pound roast. I'm thinking this will be close to a 6 hour cook at 250* with some applewood smoke.
  11. Used my IQ110 temp controller for an 8.5 lb pork shoulder this past weekend. I had to fab the hose vent from the controller to make it fit with the lower Brinkman Kamado vent, not too cosmic, but it's really a "one size fits most" piece and may be tailored to another product. I'll get a better pic of this and attach. The controller worked great in concert with my dual probe mustang thermometer and held the temp within a few degrees of 225 for the entire cook. I will say that more coal seemed to have been used up than if I would have shut everything down and fiddled with the vents thruoughout the cook, but this controller really did make it easier.
  12. A Smokin’ Duo - Chopped Wild Pig Shoulder and Pulled Beef Chuck Roast My brother is an avid hunter and on my last trip to visit him in Louisiana he gave me some wild pig he had in the freezer. In the batch were some bone-in shoulders. Each was about 5 ½ pounds. Since I had not done a major pork cook in a while and freezer space was running low it was time head to the Kamado with some wild pork. It was a first time for me cooking wild pig. Two shoulders were prepped along with a chuck roast because I was also craving some pulled beef. An interesting note - I was going for pulled pork. But when it was time to pull the pork which was cooked to about 205 internal and had a good level of probe tenderness, it was not amenable to being pulled, so we did a coarse cube chop. An interesting take away from this (in the assessment of my son and I and confirmed by my brother) was that this wild pork harvested in the Pearl River/Honey Island Swamp was much much leaner than domestic pork and hence did not have the same level of fat and collagen to promote pulling. I was considering removing it at a lower temperature but it was probing tough. The aroma and the flavor of the pork was excellent – much more of a pronounced level of real “porkiness”. The texture was also firmer – again due to the lack of internal fat. The 4 ½ lb beef chuck was simply coated with Montreal steak and cooked until roughly 208 internal and butter tender. It was foil wrapped at about 140 degrees internal. It pulled beautifully. The cucumber side was sauced with oil and balsamic vinegar. Made for a nice complement to the meats. A Double Portion of Smoked Meats --- Let’s Eat The Coarse Cubed Chopped Pork Shoulder The Pulled Beef Chuck A Nice New Orleans Sazerac to Complement the Good Food The Wild Pig Shoulders The shoulders were injected with my modified version of Chris Lilly’s injection (less salt and the addition of sriracha). The rub is my modified version of the Mike Mills Magic Dust recipe. Injected and Rub Applied The Beef with the Montreal Steak Seasoning These meats were cooked at ~275 degrees indirect in Big(Red )Joe with a good hickory smoke. The chuck took about 5 hrs and the pork about 6.5 hours. The potatoes for just a couple of hours. A Happy Big Joe The dinosaur turds (white baking potatoes) were merely rubbed with oil (sometimes I also coat with the meat rub but chose not to this time) and then removed when they got soft after a couple of hours. The skin gets a bit crunchy and the smoke gives them a rich dark color and rich flavor. Dinosaur Turds - aka Smoked Baked Potatoes Beef Finished and Removed– Pork Almost Done One of the Pig Shoulders The Chopped Wild Pig Shoulder The Pulled Beef The next time I do wild pig (I have more in the freezer) I think I might wrap the meat in foil midway through the stall and see if the steaming effect might promote pulling. On the other hand, the coarse cube chop on the meat was a nice change and did not detract from the meal and the result. Let’s see… I think I have some “hams” he gave me from the same pig - onward to the next adventure.
  13. I decided to go ahead and get a post started, since Day 28 might wind up bleeding over into Day 29. I got a very late start this morning and didn't get my roast on the grill until nearly noon. I'll come back and update with the final product at whatever time it winds up being done tonight. About 4.7 lbs of boneless shoulder roast, tied up, and having sat in a rub of chili powder, garlic, salt, and a little brown sugar for a day or so. On the grill ... cast iron diffuser and aluminum drip pan at the ready: 6 hours later, holding a stall at about 167°. I bumped the temp up to 300° and we'll see if we can get this baby off the grill before midnight.
  14. Tonight I will chase the holy grail of BBQ, the overnight slow cook with charcoal. The related forums have been a great source of information, and I thank everyone that takes the time to share their knowledge and experience. It has helped me to create a plan. I have a 13 pound boneless pork shoulder, and Secret Weapon rub from Oakridge BBQ. The shoulder separated into two, roughly equal pieces when I applied the rub. I plan to cook one above the other. I plan to start my fire after dinner tonight, and have the pork in the cooker by 10:00pm. I am using an AKORN kamado, and have successfully smoked ribs, grilled steaks and baked pizza so far. Photos of the progress to follow.....
  15. Tonight I will chase the holy grail of BBQ, the overnight slow cook with charcoal. The related forums have been a great source of information, and I thank everyone that takes the time to share their knowledge and experience. It has helped me to create a plan. I have a 13 pound boneless pork shoulder, and Secret Weapon rub from Oakridge BBQ. The shoulder separated into two, roughly equal pieces when I aplied the rub. Any thoughts on whether I should I try to reassemble them, or cook as two roasts over/under? I plan to start my fire after dinner tonight, and have the pork in the cooker by 8:00pm. I am using an AKORN kamado, and have successfully smoked ribs, grilled steaks and baked pizza so far. Any last minute thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
  16. Just did my first true low-n-slow. Did a duck earlier but it was more a medium than a low and slow. This was an 11 pound pork shoulder. Used John Henry's "Bubba's Rub" and Chris Lilly's pork injection recipe to season the shoulder. John Henry's is my favorite brand of rubs and marinades. Operates out of Houston, Texas. Look him up on the web. Great stuff. All in all I was pleased with the results. Used the SS colander to hold the charcoal, but used the advice I got from Toe and used a cardboard tp holder to keep the center of the charcoal open for the lighter cube. However I just left the tube there and lit it all! Worked great. Up and cooking in about 20 min. Held the grate temp between 230 and 260 for 5 hours. When the meat temp reached about 160 I pulled the shoulder, placed it in a disposable pan, sealed it well with heavy duty aluminum foil, replaced the temp probe, and put it back on. Here is where the problem began. Used two digital thermometers, one for the grate temp and one for the meat temp. Meat went to 185 and "stalled". I had read about the stall before but either never hit it or didn't notice with my other cookers (I own more than I should with out a catering business!). This being my first Kamado style I thought it might be different. After an a couple of hours I bumped the grate temp up to 340. Another hour and a half and meat was still at 185? I pulled the probe from the digital thermometer it had been in and put it in two others (all use the same probe) and all read within a couple of degrees of 185? Something had to be wrong. So I pulled the meat off and tested it with my instant read thermometer. 207! I usually stop my pork at 195 (that is where I set the alarm on the meat thermometer) and it comes off great. 207 should be dry and miserable, but it wasn't. I got lucky, I had wrapped the shoulder very well and added about a cup of apple juice to the pan and that kept it from getting bone dry. Though it was still a little dry it was not bad at all. Very tasty, Bone came out easy and clean. Pulled apart and shredded well. Had a thicker bark than I am accustomed to on pork but I treated it like "burnt ends" on a brisket, just chopped it up and mixed it well with the juices in the bottom of the pan and it turned out marvelous. We got some nice q out of the deal, but the problem with the temperature probe bothers me. It was a polder replacement and I had tested it (using ice water and boiling water) when I opened it. I will test it again tomorrow and try to see what is going on. It had to be the probe because all three digital thermometers read essentially the same temp with that probe. I know probes can fail, but I thought they would just stop reading, or read something totally weird and obviously wrong. From now on I will test my probes before each cook, just to be sure. And I am going to email Polder abut this also since this was just the second time I had used that probe and neither one was in a high temp environment. Now for another smoked pork sandwich!
  17. Just did my first true low-n-slow. Did a duck earlier but it was more a medium than a low and slow. This was an 11 pound pork shoulder. Used John Henry's "Bubba's Rub" and Chris Lilly's pork injection recipe to season the shoulder. John Henry's is my favorite brand of rubs and marinades. Operates out of Houston, Texas. Look him up on the web. Great stuff. All in all I was pleased with the results. Used the SS colander to hold the charcoal, but used the advice I got from Toe and used a cardboard tp holder to keep the center of the charcoal open for the lighter cube. However I just left the tube there and lit it all! Worked great. Up and cooking in about 20 min. Held the grate temp between 230 and 260 for 5 hours. When the meat temp reached about 160 I pulled the shoulder, placed it in a disposable pan, sealed it well with heavy duty aluminum foil, replaced the temp probe, and put it back on. Here is where the problem began. Used two digital thermometers, one for the grate temp and one for the meat temp. Meat went to 185 and "stalled". I had read about the stall before but either never hit it or didn't notice with my other cookers (I own more than I should with out a catering business!). This being my first Kamado style I thought it might be different. After an a couple of hours I bumped the grate temp up to 340. Another hour and a half and meat was still at 185? I pulled the probe from the digital thermometer it had been in and put it in two others (all use the same probe) and all read within a couple of degrees of 185? Something had to be wrong. So I pulled the meat off and tested it with my instant read thermometer. 207! I usually stop my pork at 195 (that is where I set the alarm on the meat thermometer) and it comes off great. 207 should be dry and miserable, but it wasn't. I got lucky, I had wrapped the shoulder very well and added about a cup of apple juice to the pan and that kept it from getting bone dry. Though it was still a little dry it was not bad at all. Very tasty, Bone came out easy and clean. Pulled apart and shredded well. Had a thicker bark than I am accustomed to on pork but I treated it like "burnt ends" on a brisket, just chopped it up and mixed it well with the juices in the bottom of the pan and it turned out marvelous. We got some nice q out of the deal, but the problem with the temperature probe bothers me. It was a polder replacement and I had tested it (using ice water and boiling water) when I opened it. I will test it again tomorrow and try to see what is going on. It had to be the probe because all three digital thermometers read essentially the same temp with that probe. I know probes can fail, but I thought they would just stop reading, or read something totally weird and obviously wrong. From now on I will test my probes before each cook, just to be sure. And I am going to email Polder abut this also since this was just the second time I had used that probe and neither one was in a high temp environment. Now for another smoked pork sandwich!
  18. After seeing that glorious post by Big Cat 305, I had to replicate one of those fantastic Cuban pork roasts. For this cook I am using Goya Mojo Criollo and will follow Big Cat's rub recipe although I will probably make more than he did. I am also using a 9 pound pork shoulder with the skin on instead of a Boston Butt, I was mistaken in saying it was 10 pounds in another post. I don't expect there to be any difference in flavor as these two cuts are from the same region but I am hoping to have some flavorful extras with the skin. So, here is the beginning of the cook: Here is what we got to work with: I decided to score the skin. Now lets inject this guy! A little more mojo on top and it's ready to be covered and set in the fridge for about 12 hours. Once the marinade has had time to work it's magic I will rub the meat down with the rub and get it on the Akorn.
  19. Thanks for saving me $1000 bucks guys! I really appreciate all of the great insight and videos that helped make this purchasing decision. I'm a proud owner of a new Akorn. I ordered from Amazon. Received dent free. Mine is the "KingGriller" branded unit. It's black and has the cast iron top vent, wood shelves, grate with no logo. Looks like the red one on Amazon is perhaps the newer version, or at least the one with CharGriller name. Some mods/ideas from this great community. - Purchased a $13 pizza stone and foiled it up for indirect heat. - Weber grate for drip pan/indirect/or elevated heat - Weber grill baskets for higher direct heat - Using Weber starters and the method of sitting them on top of the fuel to try to get a low and slow going. Need to get a proper thermometer next. I'm using an All-Clad branded oven probe as of now. Shows the built-in thermo is about 50 degrees high...if that is precise. First - had a 3lb pork shoulder picnic in the freezer that made a perfect test subject. Bone in. I brined for 2 days, dried it out, then did an overnight rub (paprika, sugar, pepper, chili powder). Things were going pretty well until I sent inside for 10 minutes with the vents open, came back out and the temp shot up to 400 degrees. I was able to bring it back down to around 275-300. Cooking time was about 6 hours to get to temperature. Used Trader Joe hardwood briquettes and a few hunks of apple wood. Bark didn't full form. Partly I think the short cook. Partly, the pork was juicing out the brine and kept the exterior moist. The meat wasn't completely fall apart, but had a great smoke flavor. Family raved about it, including my assistant, also pictured. Second cook - 2 spatchcocked chickens. Each close to 4 lbs. With poultry I follow the Thansgiving rule - 2 small ones are easier to get right than one big one - which is easy to overcook in parts. Once again, left the scene for a few minutes with vents open and the temp went nuts...to about 600 degrees. I was able to bring it back down within 10 minutes. Eyeballed the chickens and cook time was about 45 minutes. Not overcooked at all. Spatchcocking is a great method. Beercan would be nice in the future as a space saver, if cooking 2 birds. One bird had an olive oil/herb rub. The other a paprika-sugar-chili spice rub. Skin fat was completely melted away. Black char skin hid super juicy, flavorful meat. Didn't notice a ton of difference in the two seasonings. I think they weren't sitting long enough in advance. But the rub bird was a little sweeter and more flavorful. We lived on the chicken all week - on its own and accents in salads. Was great in a curry chicken salad. HIUGE hit. Everyone's happy so far. Lessons - Get that new thermometer. Might not be able to wait for that new E733 at the end of the month. Need to cook up for a halloween party. Don't leave the scene with vents open. No shortcuts to getting to temperature. Brine on a pork shoulder might not be worth it "Mistakes" never tasted so good Pictures - first pork shoulder, and my BBQ assistant. Check out that smoke.
  20. This is my first cook on the Akorn and with charcoal grilling. Picked one up at Kroger a couple days ago. Did a practice run the other night and the akorn held steady at 215 for an hour, then I moved it up to 350 to season the cast iron with some crisco. Both temperatures held incredibly steady. First cook started this morning with a 5lb Boston Butt. I accidentally snuffed out the fire a couple times but eventually got the hang of it. Temperature settled at 230, but after 30 min my brand new Maverick ET 732 food probe went dead, and then an hour later the grill probe went dead. When I pulled the probes out of the transmitters, both connections tips appear broken (these things were cheaply made.) Customer service from Maverick is sending me some new ones. Right now the butt is cooking blind. Im just using the dome thermometer which has been holding steady right at 200 for 4 hours, I think its about 30 degrees off. I opened the grill for the first time and the meat read 160 with an analog probe. Any suggestions on how often I should open the dome and check the meat temp? 6 hours in. Still at 160 (2 hour stall). BTW that's rosemary (not larvae), didn't have the powder stuff. Dome temp holding steady at 200.
  21. I'd like to get some guidance about how to achieve the best bark consistency when smoking a pork shoulder butt roast. I find that on the last few cooks I've done on my Akorn (even at low & slow temps between 218-235 for approximately 14-17 hours for a 8-9 lb butt), the bark is fairly tough and when I pull/shred the pork, I end up having to remove the harder/tougher pieces of the bark from the final product. I have found that when I foil the pork butt sooner, I don't get as much smoke flavor but I get a softer bark. I love a strong smoke flavor and so I would like to find the optimal time to leave the butt on as long as possible before foiling. Additional information: I inject the pork butt with apple juice, and most of the time I put some apple juice in (1/4 cup) when I foil. I put about 1-2" of water in my 9x13 drip pan which sits on top of my heat diffuser below the pork shoulder. There is a fair amount of steam and condensation, evidenced by dark drops of "smoke water" leaking from vents and cracks during the cook. This has caused me some concern especially regarding the potential for rust on the Akorn near the ash pan and the edges of the lid. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  22. Picked up a 13.5 lbs boneless pork shoulder from Costco for Mother's Day dinner. This was my 1st ever butt roast so I cut it in half so if I crashed and burned I'd still have another try at it. I did make a couple of rookie mistakes but all in all it came out great. So last night I slathered it up with mustard and then John's recipe pork rub. (Thanks John) Wrapped it up and into the frig. Up at 6:00 AM to light the kamado (1st mistake, it should have been 4:00 AM) and butt goes on at 6:50. Next mistake (If I can say this) is hugging and talking to my wife when she gets up. (Left the kamado to long and it got up to 250 when I was hoping for 225) Turn down the vents to try and get it to come down but it never does. I'm thinking approx. 8 hours ought to be enough so I'm shooting for an approx. dinner time of 4:00. (Wrong again) And yet another mistake is putting a room temp floor tile in as a heat deflector. You guessed it, "TINK". Everything is going along nicely until it hits 158 degrees. It didn't budge off of 158 for 90 minutes. (There goes my 8 hours!) Around 3:30 I'm realizing that I’m going to have to pull it out before 190 degrees. Pulled at 3:50 (182 degrees) and into the foil. Care to guess where the butts is? An hour later I pull it out. I proceed to pull it apart. (If I could’ve gone to 190 I’m sure this would’ve been easier) Here are the money shots. Not the best I’ve ever had but not too far away from it. :D
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